HSway

HSway

Lives in United Kingdom London, United Kingdom
Has a website at www.sunwaysite.com
Joined on Mar 21, 2010

Comments

Total: 220, showing: 41 – 60
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On article Action-packed: Sony a6500 review (1188 comments in total)

A fair review of a first high-end camera since the iconic NEX 7.

The APS-C is a second-tier system to Sony. Which is similar to other brands as no one seems to go fully into two systems of neighbouring formats. Canon perhaps has gotten furthest with this. Pentax, slightly different, but also far from ideal and so is its volume on the market.
To me the highlights of the NEX type cameras are the position of the viewfinder, simplicity, extremely capable operation and traditional, solid, brick-like shaped body. Battery power is not that big problem as these spares are tiny, or not always as a lot depends on how the camera is set and used; more lasting power is always welcome.
The second-tier systems will be getting incremental improvements but the main arena is now 135 format where Sony is continuing their ambitious plans which of course means also lenses.

Link | Posted on Dec 15, 2016 at 09:41 UTC as 91st comment
On article Gear of the Year: Richard's choice - Fujifilm X-T2 (170 comments in total)

Look of Sony native (even Sigma) APS-C lenses is a weak point of the system (not the only one). I wouldn’t mind using word ugly sometimes. Fujinon lenses are generally nice in comparison and as I say it’s not just nitpicking but quite a contrast. And of course this matters.

Link | Posted on Dec 14, 2016 at 20:18 UTC as 23rd comment
In reply to:

Howard: "Plastic is so beautiful, mermaids love it, so let's put more in the ocean!" -- is that the message?

It shows the beauty of nature and its elements, waste, human signature and fragility (vulnerability) of both.

Link | Posted on Dec 13, 2016 at 18:54 UTC

I was quite stunned when I saw the first shot in the morning. The work with the bottles makes for even stronger visual impact than the human element (and could make a separate piece without it - though I wouldn't change anything). The first and second are truly excellent.

Link | Posted on Dec 13, 2016 at 18:46 UTC as 7th comment
In reply to:

maxnimo: Hard to believe that any 20mm lens would need to be so tall (long), especially in this age of excellent pancake lenses.

@maxnimo Knowing Tokina and the trend/demands this lens will try to achieve minimum aberrations and softness across the frame and aperture range. I.e. it’s going to have relatively consistent sharpness. If we are talking about the same lens – a 20/2 FE lens of a smaller size could not be made as good and also not as inexpensive.

You can also optimise a lens for a small size and for the performance in the centre as another useful configuration. 20mm UWA is one of the less attractive candidates for this. Though being an f2 lens it's not that absurd idea (still, hardly a priority).
Then there is the flange distance factor that’s confusing. A ML body is thin making the distance shorter and lenses have to very often make up for the distance by their own size so that they can be designed properly – as needed (The ML is not only about size).

Link | Posted on Dec 13, 2016 at 18:30 UTC
In reply to:

maxnimo: Hard to believe that any 20mm lens would need to be so tall (long), especially in this age of excellent pancake lenses.

A pancake of this FOV and speed will be compromise on everything but the size. That can be a good compromise and for some use even great.
This most likely is a negative-lead type which doesn’t need a large element for its arrangement deals inherently better with the peripheral shading (though the end result depends on the exact design). It’s the positive-lead UWAs - usually with those bulbous elements - that need to be really wide diameter.

Link | Posted on Dec 13, 2016 at 06:02 UTC
On article Have your say: Best prime lens of 2016 (152 comments in total)

This has to be Nikkor 105. Tamron or Sigma Art 85? I hear both are excellent. OK, Art. The PC 19 may well be best of all but not my lens, third.
The Olympus has some great telephoto there, I saw samples..

Link | Posted on Dec 12, 2016 at 17:14 UTC as 10th comment
On article Have Your Say: Best Zoom Lens of 2016 (75 comments in total)

Nikkor 70-200/2.8 e looks very nice so far; second 12-24 Art – not far from the 11-24/4 it starts at 12mm which helps with the size. I feel the Canon 16-35 III may be a small notch over the GMs? may be not. Hey this only is fun:)

PS, I see the Sigma 50-100mm F1.8 is doing very well. Well deserved!

Link | Posted on Dec 12, 2016 at 17:04 UTC as 5th comment

Canon removes somewhat perceivable gap in the sensor quality, in what I’d regard as "the real-world one", in another category and after the 6d makes another camera that I really like. It takes first place as both d5 and d500 are a bit further for my needs. I ran out of the bars the Alpha 6500 would be next! All of them are fantastic.

Link | Posted on Dec 12, 2016 at 16:42 UTC as 11th comment
On article Sigma 12-24mm F4 DG HSM Art Lens Review (274 comments in total)
In reply to:

The Rock Nikon: I am a Nikon guy. How does it compare to the 14-24? Or 10-24mm Nikkors?

The 14-24 is excellent on Dx. The Sigma has a little weaker centre so it will shine on Fx more (also given the very good resolution in the outer regions). Both are a bit overkill lenses for Dx that shine on Fx, I’d take a look at several new Tokina UWA zooms instead – these will give you a more comparable angle of view as well.

Link | Posted on Nov 28, 2016 at 10:39 UTC
On article Sigma 12-24mm F4 DG HSM Art Lens Review (274 comments in total)

Very helpful and interesting. Dxomark results are very similar to the samples here. I am usually careful with relying on the tests with these angles. The conclusion is spot on. Sigma is a great lens and when it comes to the sharpness across the field its strong point is f8. It’s more limited at and beyond 20mm. The lack of CA and distortion control is very impressive.
The 11-24 holds its own and that's when taking its price into account, it’s the better lens for me. The mention referring to its lateral CA as rather extreme – to me it would be more that the 12-24/4 is extremely clean. From the design standpoint, I’d go for more distortion (of the Canon or of my 14-24 that have a good control) over less consistent resolution. It’s likely that Sigma gave its preference the other way, and that, in theory, it could be improved when designed for about the same distortions and less clean CA. Anyway these are difficult beasts. The more grateful many of us are for the study.

Link | Posted on Nov 28, 2016 at 10:20 UTC as 21st comment
On article DPReview Asks: What was your first camera? (765 comments in total)

Vilia in 83.

Link | Posted on Nov 4, 2016 at 18:19 UTC as 416th comment
On article Fast Five: Sony Cyber-shot RX100 V Review (434 comments in total)

Is there a real* weakness relative to the competition? The pop-up viewfinder really sets it apart from the other cameras then. That sadly includes the future DL 24-85. Even if you don’t need it much for your shooting its benefits become clear enough when shooting outdoor in the bright - brightish conditions. That is often. Of course, the new segment goes through a development as a whole. But it strikes me as ingenious and aggressive from Sony to bet on a feature that imo matters most – and being able to implement it – a good viewfinder.

Link | Posted on Nov 3, 2016 at 13:36 UTC as 93rd comment
In reply to:

HSway: That’s first time I see the purpose for V cameras explained: It’s for professionals who need to do a quick job with a telephoto without lugging a lot of gear.

Amateurs/enthusiasts sometimes don’t like the professional gear (mostly because it’s expensive or heavy) so the V could fit this category possibly for its reasons. That would then explain the limited market for the V and why Nikon may not be that concerned by this fact. OTOH, if the ambition was anything more, then the V line cameras would certainly struggle among the competition.

Fair point. Looks that I should actually have said – finally I got it. My mistake. To be honest there were more of us struggling with this.

Link | Posted on Oct 26, 2016 at 18:10 UTC

Of course, speaking of serious compact cameras, there is the simple little marvel of APS-C machine like the a6500 and the whole array of cameras from others. But it seems that implementing ML on this level would upset Nikon APS-C strategy and their all-DSLR role in it. The ML is not part of it yet (apart from the known part). Who knows what the plans for the future are. One has to respect that. The responsibility is on their shoulders. Frankly pushing into saturated market packed with excellent products is not that inviting, especially these days. They do their best to stay efficient. And there is the continuous pressure towards the 135 format even Sony can’t resist.

Link | Posted on Oct 26, 2016 at 17:59 UTC as 47th comment

The DL cameras look great I think. And it’s an excellent idea to include this concept. I am sure the mention of d800 user was just an example to highlight the appeal for Nikon users (controls etc.). I also think Mr Inoue, in his explanation, hints that J cameras are meant more for lower-end user. But there is also the possibility of using the DL platform/style for these users instead. This would seem more intuitive for this type of a buyer – compared to the interchangeable lens camera like the J. I haven’t formed a strong opinion on this and I like the J5 camera but it seems to me that the IL cameras will be all soon be expected to have some finder.

Link | Posted on Oct 26, 2016 at 16:53 UTC as 51st comment

That’s first time I see the purpose for V cameras explained: It’s for professionals who need to do a quick job with a telephoto without lugging a lot of gear.

Amateurs/enthusiasts sometimes don’t like the professional gear (mostly because it’s expensive or heavy) so the V could fit this category possibly for its reasons. That would then explain the limited market for the V and why Nikon may not be that concerned by this fact. OTOH, if the ambition was anything more, then the V line cameras would certainly struggle among the competition.

Link | Posted on Oct 26, 2016 at 16:28 UTC as 54th comment | 8 replies
In reply to:

Timur Born: Having the focus ring closer to the camera is a real benefit for video shooting (where AF is useless on Nikon cameras). This is one of the things I like about my Tamron 24-70.

The zoom ring has to offer really smooth action then, though, else you have to change your grip on the lens instead of just using finger-tips (one area where the Tamron 70-200 often fails).

Example of that each lens needs to be tried individually could be my 200-500 VR. When handholding 200-500 VR I use collar foot for support as some do which also puts my fingers right under the zoom ring (also placed second) and creates nice room for my fingers to turn the ring. (The long throw makes the zooming still difficult.)
Most of the time I am zooming on a tripod with loose head with this lens, which is much more comfortable. And I don't zoom very often with this lens.

Link | Posted on Oct 21, 2016 at 13:30 UTC
In reply to:

Timur Born: Having the focus ring closer to the camera is a real benefit for video shooting (where AF is useless on Nikon cameras). This is one of the things I like about my Tamron 24-70.

The zoom ring has to offer really smooth action then, though, else you have to change your grip on the lens instead of just using finger-tips (one area where the Tamron 70-200 often fails).

I was thinking exactly that. The 70-200/2.8 lens won’t be used for video as much though (as for the typical use).
I hold the telephotos (all lenses) close to the camera to become one solid piece of a body but someone taller with longer hands can like to support the telephoto further from the camera as I remember reading in the lens forum. It’s one way of stabilising the lens vs another.
My Canon 70-300 L had the zoom ring placed second which I didn’t exactly like but it wasn’t a problem either (and it was harder to turn). Each lens is different, though, this lens was short, bulky (it extended). But I can’t base much opinion on this because I didn’t use it ideally but on small, later very small APS-C bodies. Best will be to do real shooting with the particular lens rather than trying this out in a shop, including those zoom switches that you can preset.

Link | Posted on Oct 21, 2016 at 12:37 UTC
In reply to:

HSway: Probably a superb lens, and lighter. 70-200 is perhaps most useful zoom on Fx in what can still be considered a normal range (just as useful for UWAs). And it’s really good idea to split that utility into 2.8 and f4 versions. Nikon eventually followed the Canon’s very nice lens with its modern f4 zoom. With all these choices now (four, five?) it’s going to be really good including for those unhappy about the focus breathing. The price should settle lower after a while (in UK).

Professional equipment.. And the real value of the currency plays its part. The version II was £ 2000 at launch but that was 7 years ago. Wex has 70-200/2.8 FL for £ 2650. Add to it the trouble the pound experiences recently, this will reflect in import prices. The large fluorite lens costs extra. If the price cycle is on the track with the version II the pricing of the 70-200/2.8 FL wouldn't be unreasonable. If the pound recovers in the near future it should improve the price.
The new 105/1.4 may be a bit more expensive for what it is. I now noticed at camerapricebuster there were two £ 200 drops yesterday (Castle and Park Cameras), the lens is sold barely two months, it will go down. The 19 PC has some devilishly complex optical formula. yes it seems expensive. OTOH my 24/1.8G and 200-500 VR were excellent value.

Link | Posted on Oct 20, 2016 at 16:30 UTC
Total: 220, showing: 41 – 60
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