HSway

HSway

Lives in United Kingdom London, United Kingdom
Has a website at www.sunwaysite.com
Joined on Mar 21, 2010

Comments

Total: 133, showing: 1 – 20
« First‹ Previous12345Next ›Last »
On article Fujifilm X-E2S: What you need to know (85 comments in total)

As was mentioned some things depend more on personal view. Fuji has developed a nice lineup, a distinct niche in APS-C and has built a solid user base fond of the system’s characteristics. A highlight could be that certain pairings are very compact and decently fast. When it comes to the size and quality little differences can mean a lot. It’s the only fully dedicated (or developed) APS-C system, and in a form of ML. But it doesn't have life that easy. There is still a lot of activity from other brands and they specialise in their own strong areas, including the APS-C DSLRs. And of course the MFT systems with a similar and quite dedicated approach thus similar target audience.
Btw, I think that 16 MP APS-C is very capable. Mature 24 MP systems can be really nice, too.

Link | Posted on Aug 17, 2016 at 14:37 UTC as 24th comment

Looks beautiful. This 105mm will be able to isolate subjects at further distance - like nothing before. The girl shot is just a small hint (and still a typical use). There are some other lenses like Nikkor 400/2.8 that have this unique capability but that’s of course a different FL lens.

Link | Posted on Jul 29, 2016 at 18:30 UTC as 12th comment
In reply to:

AstroStan: At that angle of coverage, rectilinear does not mean "no distortions" unless you qualify that term, e.g. "as distortion free as is possible with a planar sensor". The geometric distortions due to projecting a spherical section onto a plane are intrinsically unavoidable (just ask a map maker).

@obsolescence When you mention this, the perspective distortion and some regular, reasonable barrel distortion can complement each other well, in my eyes at least. The barrel reduces compression of the central to mid zone in a special way which works very well for most instances.
Of course for certain applications the very straight lines are priority.

Link | Posted on Jul 26, 2016 at 17:36 UTC
In reply to:

HSway: Samyang produces some excellent optics. It needs to improve its sample variation record, though, based on common user practice and snap-shot sample variance data provided by lensrentals where among 42 entries Samyang’s performance sits at the very bottom of the group. It’s a shame for the lenses can really be very good. And perhaps this is improving. They also brought AF lenses to the market suggesting they can go beyond what they were known for.

You are right, Samyang is will be quite close to what its niche allows.
I am an owner of 35/1.4 (not cine), an excellent sample and a very good lens by today’s standards. And probably just speculating that if a Samyang lens was priced some 1/3 higher whether that could get it a notch better as the buying confidence seems a concern with them. I know it would be to me. But I am not alone in this market and my information to judge this is fairly limited.
It's not that the variation is terrible, at least the sample provided by lensrentals shows other manufacturers drop to that level happily with some lenses (terrible or not). But the average per make is telling.

Link | Posted on Jul 19, 2016 at 20:42 UTC

Gary Elmer at Quora gives an excellent summary on cine lenses, reasons for the higher cost and perspective on the value.

https://www.quora.com/Cinematography-Why-are-cinema-lenses-more-expensive-than-photography-lenses

Link | Posted on Jul 19, 2016 at 10:35 UTC as 6th comment

Samyang produces some excellent optics. It needs to improve its sample variation record, though, based on common user practice and snap-shot sample variance data provided by lensrentals where among 42 entries Samyang’s performance sits at the very bottom of the group. It’s a shame for the lenses can really be very good. And perhaps this is improving. They also brought AF lenses to the market suggesting they can go beyond what they were known for.

Link | Posted on Jul 19, 2016 at 06:54 UTC as 7th comment | 4 replies
On article Medium-format mirrorless: Hasselblad unveils X1D (1190 comments in total)
In reply to:

HSway: Looking nice. Significant I think. Mainly for Hasselblad and for MF in general. It can be viewed as endorsement for ML concept as well, if that is needed. But interesting to see MF conservative machines merged with ML. One can imagine the low volume/high cost/high precision manufacturing process just crying out for phasing out complex elements. I think there is little doubt that the DSLR concept will become a minority in the future. Whichever is going to be better or valued higher by you is another question.
As for the EVF as new element in photography, and *technicalities aside*, nothing against it. Nature of processing of photographs is based on computer and digital technology for most of us so in that sense looking through the live view finder feels like having one leg in the darkroom. IOW it is not that foreign or big a barrier. Sure things like quality/responsiveness or experience with the particular finder help. OTOH, the OVF become a distinct feature among the pictures taking

- among the pictures taking devices can still be appreciated and preferred by a large segment of the market.

Link | Posted on Jun 22, 2016 at 14:51 UTC
On article Medium-format mirrorless: Hasselblad unveils X1D (1190 comments in total)

Looking nice. Significant I think. Mainly for Hasselblad and for MF in general. It can be viewed as endorsement for ML concept as well, if that is needed. But interesting to see MF conservative machines merged with ML. One can imagine the low volume/high cost/high precision manufacturing process just crying out for phasing out complex elements. I think there is little doubt that the DSLR concept will become a minority in the future. Whichever is going to be better or valued higher by you is another question.
As for the EVF as new element in photography, and *technicalities aside*, nothing against it. Nature of processing of photographs is based on computer and digital technology for most of us so in that sense looking through the live view finder feels like having one leg in the darkroom. IOW it is not that foreign or big a barrier. Sure things like quality/responsiveness or experience with the particular finder help. OTOH, the OVF become a distinct feature among the pictures taking

Link | Posted on Jun 22, 2016 at 14:50 UTC as 216th comment | 1 reply

It’s true that getting more light on a smaller sensor gets exponentially difficult to achieve. But it’s obvious that most folks know about the implications a smaller sensor has, it’s no accident you use it but a choice you make. If MFT had suddenly focused on fast glass and that was central to the system you’d understand the criticism.

Link | Posted on Jun 16, 2016 at 06:48 UTC as 46th comment
In reply to:

HSway: I saw Sony A7 series ML going throw similar debates - especially to those looking at the ML for its size/weight advantage the fast lens releases are hard to comprehend. But I don’t think there is a reason for much controversy here as the fast lenses just expand* small size orientated systems utility and versatility and although such a system will naturally gravitate around portable solutions it predominantly employs it doesn’t have to be limited* by them and can of course offer another option, be it just one specific fast lens someone is interested in alongside more typical kit. Just that a system is building on advantage of a particular design principles does not necessarily mean it must be strictly limited by them. Or are those MFT users forced to buy these fast lenses left with no other choice? I don’t think they are. Sony the same, e.g. 35/2.8 and f1.4 options* = f1.4 lens an added option to complete the system-characteristic f2.8 35.

Yes expensive but consider that Touit is not dust/splash proof and when announced its price was $1250 exl. VAT. MFT isn’t the best system for quality fast wide angles – but Panasonic does offer it, too, for a price and in high end style.

Link | Posted on Jun 16, 2016 at 06:32 UTC

I saw Sony A7 series ML going throw similar debates - especially to those looking at the ML for its size/weight advantage the fast lens releases are hard to comprehend. But I don’t think there is a reason for much controversy here as the fast lenses just expand* small size orientated systems utility and versatility and although such a system will naturally gravitate around portable solutions it predominantly employs it doesn’t have to be limited* by them and can of course offer another option, be it just one specific fast lens someone is interested in alongside more typical kit. Just that a system is building on advantage of a particular design principles does not necessarily mean it must be strictly limited by them. Or are those MFT users forced to buy these fast lenses left with no other choice? I don’t think they are. Sony the same, e.g. 35/2.8 and f1.4 options* = f1.4 lens an added option to complete the system-characteristic f2.8 35.

Link | Posted on Jun 15, 2016 at 21:47 UTC as 62nd comment | 3 replies
On article 2016 Roundup: Semi-Pro Interchangeable Lens Cameras (261 comments in total)

Well.. great times... The camera gear truly gets into exciting territory. I think the D750 is a better all-rounder for a wider audience than the D810. And being cheaper it will have a broader appeal. There are improvements to be made but this little camera is very capable and very well thought out.
Nikon’s got a long record of configuring its cameras excellently and the recent, here, 2-3-year-old bodies are another example of that. Something I wouldn’t quite say about its accessory department. Sony is doing at least just as well in this. Generally, the gaps get tighter among the competition, now further differentiated by ML v DSLR, as the digital camera mature and more of the potential gets transferred into photography and video/cinematography. So it mostly is about relatively smaller differences whereas the specialisation of the camera and the character of the system play the role.

Link | Posted on Jun 14, 2016 at 13:09 UTC as 24th comment
On article Lens shootout: Sony RX10 III destroys the competition (487 comments in total)

I’d say it depends if someone needs more than 400mm. Panasonic can fill that role perfectly. The overall sharpness looks about the same, as is the max. aperture. For stronger evidence another set of cameras would be worth to check as well. If the reach is priority... no one can do f4/600mm, not even 500. And the lens deliverers impressively at that setting! The competition will find this a tough act to follow and tougher to compete.

I am thinking that a shorter shooting distance would help to tackle the thermal distortion and still represent frequent scenario in the actual use. Long distance is still very useful to see though because extreme ends tend to reveal more differences.

Link | Posted on May 28, 2016 at 07:58 UTC as 60th comment

Very sad news.

Link | Posted on May 21, 2016 at 08:23 UTC as 25th comment

In some, specific conditions with a frequent rain/shower this is a handy hassle-free solution for having this kind of gear at hand. It needs a good hood, though.
For one or two levels up protection I use Ferrino Trekker Rp (zipper & Velcro version) that will take care of anything you might have hanging on you including the rucksack. We had them sent from Spain. You can even sit in dry for a long time. Unless you are busy bailing out water from your boat!

Link | Posted on May 14, 2016 at 15:19 UTC as 32nd comment

Some of us need wider AF points spread. I am sure the number of those that need it will go up. The biggest drawback of current Nikons, or most DSLRs. With growing number of lenses where DOF can be very shallow or field curvature benefiting from this way of shooting this is becoming important for handheld use. So it's not only useful for action and related tracking modes. The camera has no EFC shutter? That I put above the pixel shift easily. Otherwise this looks like a great camera with excellent features. And a great sensor. IR receivers etc! The majority of the target audience may not be very bothered with the greater AF points spread at this point.

Link | Posted on May 11, 2016 at 18:43 UTC as 10th comment
In reply to:

HSway: Someone said that Sony doesn’t have heart. That's true, it's easier to spot it in Olympus, Fuji and even Panasonic’s Lumix area. Some of it probably comes from making cameras for multiple segments on multiple platforms - tuning each for its best use. Sony is also capable of creating top notch opics and it’s not like they have no tradition in this filed, not least through their video/film making devices. But this approach makes it great deal more difficult to do things systematically, and they definitely are slower in getting that almost everyone can produce a decent camera but it’s the lens that is at the core of the system today. And every single one is decisive for it whether on an inexpensive or expensive side. But I think they are getting there. Though how their whole approach will develop exactly remains to be seen.

Yep, very significant.

Link | Posted on Jan 31, 2016 at 21:02 UTC

This price hike was in Europe and UK too, we have been warned. On the whole, it’s the price record long term that counts. This "seasonal" shifts are absorbed in this. Generally and despite the challenges, Nikon didn’t seem doing very bad for value and competitiveness so far.

Link | Posted on Jan 31, 2016 at 12:30 UTC as 12th comment

Someone said that Sony doesn’t have heart. That's true, it's easier to spot it in Olympus, Fuji and even Panasonic’s Lumix area. Some of it probably comes from making cameras for multiple segments on multiple platforms - tuning each for its best use. Sony is also capable of creating top notch opics and it’s not like they have no tradition in this filed, not least through their video/film making devices. But this approach makes it great deal more difficult to do things systematically, and they definitely are slower in getting that almost everyone can produce a decent camera but it’s the lens that is at the core of the system today. And every single one is decisive for it whether on an inexpensive or expensive side. But I think they are getting there. Though how their whole approach will develop exactly remains to be seen.

Link | Posted on Jan 31, 2016 at 12:09 UTC as 13th comment | 2 replies
On article Sigma 20mm F1.4 'Art' lens real-world sample gallery (137 comments in total)

Most was said but for a Nikon shooter, I’d say that you would have to have a good reason to consider the Sigma, in my opinion. Construction/build, speed, size/weight are the obvious differences. Where these are not very important the advantage in performance or rendering can swing decisions. Big advantage of the faster Sigma would be having an edge wide open, especially for the handheld shooting and keeping that advantage over the wider area (spots) of the frame. I know that if I was after this sort of lens that would be important. OTOH, while the Sigma is no doubt unique this Nikkor seems no less unique for its performance/size ratio and even the price is very competitive. We were pretty surprised in the lens forum after this came out and reports so far suggest it is an amazing little lens.

Link | Posted on Jan 29, 2016 at 13:39 UTC as 19th comment
Total: 133, showing: 1 – 20
« First‹ Previous12345Next ›Last »