Shaminder Dulai

DPReview Administrator
Joined on Aug 5, 2022

Comments

Total: 44, showing: 1 – 20
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On article PMA 2001 show report: Section two (2 comments in total)
In reply to:

Barney Britton: First.

Second!

Link | Posted on Jan 24, 2023 at 23:38 UTC
On article Hands on with the Panasonic Lumix DC-S5 II (118 comments in total)
In reply to:

Fairlane: Camera of the year?

https://www.digitalcameraworld.com/reviews/panasonic-lumix-s5-ii-review

I supposed by default, you're right, since it's the only camera released thus far in 2023.

Link | Posted on Jan 19, 2023 at 20:40 UTC
In reply to:

achim k: Inspired by this article, I fitted my old Pentax Takumar 55mm lens to my new Olympus OM-1 camera, and the 5.7MP viewfinder is wonderful for manual focus, even with no magnification or peaking. It is fun and it is accurate!

That's awesome! Do you find that you prefer that option? Feeling like anything is missing?

Link | Posted on Jan 12, 2023 at 20:09 UTC
In reply to:

Greg VdB: The one number that really caught my eye was DPR turning 25 this year. Where has all that time gone?!! (just imagine how many latest-and-greatest marvels of technology have arrived and then dwindled into near oblivion in the rearview mirror...)

Also made me realize that I started visiting here since about 2000 and am an active member for just over 20 years. This makes DPR my longest-active "online home" by far :-)

The Olympus 3030, wow, now that's a throwback! I think it was about 1999/2000 that I used that camera in journalism school. It was one of the first digital cameras I got to play with. I remember liking how fast it was, but I didn't stick with it and opted to stick with film for a few more years. It wasn't until I got my hands on a Canon d2000 that I made the actual switch to digital, which was also the time that I become a DPReview reader as well. Time flies. I'll see you in 20 years when we're all blinking our eyes to take pictures with smart eyeglasses.

Link | Posted on Jan 4, 2023 at 18:57 UTC
In reply to:

Cheapo Marx: "how the US is joining the rest of the world"

Buying mirrorless is "joining the rest of the world"?

Have you taken a good look at the rest of the world?

I'll stick to glass flappers.

Well, strictly going by the numbers, I'm afraid so.

US shipments are starting to fall closer into alignment with the global shipment numbers. We've seen for years, sales of DSLR cameras holding on in the US while they fell in the rest of the world. This year, we saw the first signs that US consumers were starting to lean mirrorless in their purchases. Once the Q4 holiday numbers are in, we'll have the complete picture.

And please don't get me wrong, I still love my DSLR personally (I take it as a backup, especially when I am shooting outdoors on assignment in the cold and battery drain is a concern), but the writing is plainly on the wall.

Link | Posted on Jan 3, 2023 at 20:00 UTC
In reply to:

Greg VdB: The one number that really caught my eye was DPR turning 25 this year. Where has all that time gone?!! (just imagine how many latest-and-greatest marvels of technology have arrived and then dwindled into near oblivion in the rearview mirror...)

Also made me realize that I started visiting here since about 2000 and am an active member for just over 20 years. This makes DPR my longest-active "online home" by far :-)

20 years! You're a legit OG around here. Thanks for being a part of the site and choosing to spend your time with us Greg VdB.

Curious, what have you seen in the last 20 that you wish had caught on instead of just disappearing? What do you think the next 20 has in store?

Link | Posted on Jan 3, 2023 at 19:51 UTC
In reply to:

Wojti: The nice-to-practice thing about numbers is that one number alone doesn't mean anything. 18 new cameras from "major manufacturers" in 2022? I have no idea whether it's an industry record; 10% of previous years or exactly the same number we've had for decades. This number, without context, doesn't mean anything.

Besides that, I think it's a GREAT idea, beautifully executed, just with that one -important- flaw :) Thanks for coming up with those ideas DPReview!

Great call out Wojti. I went back to look at 2021 and it turns out there were 18 new releases from the majors in 2021 as well. Further, there were 30 in 2020 and 45 in 2019. Perhaps it's not a surprise, as the industry seems to have spent the last two years updating high-end and mid-level cameras where as in prior years we saw many new cameras at multiple price points. We've updated the article to reflect this. Thanks for the suggestion.

Link | Posted on Jan 3, 2023 at 19:11 UTC
On article Our favorite photos we shot in 2022 (71 comments in total)
In reply to:

araudan: 'this is what I saw, this is what I cared about and ultimately, this is proof I existed.' Thank you Shaminder. A great summary of why I take photos as well. Especially the family photos shared with those I care about but not shared online. I also agree with Chris and Gannon about how great it is to get an image of your kids that captures the essence of what you see in them.

Aw thanks @araudan, I always felt that photography really is more than megapixels and buffer rates. Family photos are a great example, which reminds me, I really need to do a better job of scanning and preserving family photos in 2023.

Link | Posted on Dec 29, 2022 at 20:00 UTC
In reply to:

Arthur Stanley Jefferson: Do sports photojournalists have to even be in the same country as the photo gear if it’s remote operated? Just pay for your perch and gear rental at the match sidelines and get an Xbox controller linked to the internet.

We might be headed there, but I think it's going to come down to tech latency as Gannon mentioned, and reliability. At this level of professional photography, it's not just about getting the best images of key moments, it's also about transmitting them to your wire subscribers before your competitors. Having remote cameras and central control panel to trigger cameras may be great, when it works. But if things fail, you want people on the ground who can get out and start making images while others on your team try to troubleshoot the remote camera setup.

I've worked assignments at NFL, NBA, NCCA and Pebble Beach and there is a lot of set up and regimenting of times to caption, upload and file images as quickly as possible, always mid-event and before the event is over. If anything goes wrong, plan B and C is always ready.

I think we may see wires send 2-3 people one day instead of a dozen, but not sending anyone leaves you at a competitive disadvantage and is a bridge too far.

Link | Posted on Dec 21, 2022 at 21:50 UTC
On article One Thing: Becoming a lifelong learner (49 comments in total)
In reply to:

jxh: I've developed the opposite tendency. So much of my shooting is with a long zoom maxxed out.

I think this is, with me, partly a psychological issue. My physical peripheral vision is fine, but when I look at things my mental attention is only on the very small space around the target of my interest. I've been working to alter that habit somewhat.

I'm curious, what lens did you first start with?

I ask, because for me it was mostly kit zoom lens when I was first learning. These kit lens were what I could afford and I remember getting a 70-300 and being so very into experimenting with longer focal points. Back then, a wide angle was hard to come by, so I suspect that years later, when I finally got my hands on a wide angle, I just tapped into my teenage self who always wanted to shoot wide but couldn't, and thus went a little nuts with it for a while.

Link | Posted on Dec 14, 2022 at 18:47 UTC
On article One Thing: Becoming a lifelong learner (49 comments in total)
In reply to:

dmartin92: I agree with everything that is said here, but I have trouble seeing it in the limited contexte of photography. In my opinion, one is either « a lifelong learner » in everything, or one is « a lifelong learner » in nothing. But even so, everything in this article is true. But it Just applies more generally to « life, in general », as near as I can see, but I am ready to hear why I am wrong in thinking that.

Spot on!

Link | Posted on Dec 12, 2022 at 17:30 UTC
On article One Thing: Becoming a lifelong learner (49 comments in total)
In reply to:

MrTofu: I'm enjoying this series. Nice write-up on staying humble and keeping that hunger to learn.

Cheers! Glad you're enjoying the series, keep an eye out for future installments. And drop us a line is there's a topic or idea you'd like to see covered.

The DPReview editors are also people who use these tools for our own work, and we're always talking behind the scenes about technique and ways to improve or experiment.

Link | Posted on Dec 9, 2022 at 16:46 UTC
On article One Thing: Becoming a lifelong learner (49 comments in total)
In reply to:

Michiel953: Like the story. What did it teach me? Keep questioning yourself and your images.

Awesome! Now get out there and make great images!

Link | Posted on Dec 8, 2022 at 19:18 UTC
On article One Thing: Becoming a lifelong learner (49 comments in total)
In reply to:

Jeff Greenberg: -----
why wide angle or not-wide-angle?
why not both, when possible, & decide later?
photojournalists already shoot many of each composition...

It's not at all an either/or. For me it became only wide for a spell, and it wasn't until someone pointed it out to me that I realized. Having the new shiny lens to play with, I lost sight of making images and get too enamored with the toy.

Link | Posted on Dec 8, 2022 at 19:17 UTC
On article One Thing: Becoming a lifelong learner (49 comments in total)
In reply to:

NikonNikoff: At first it kinda feels silly for needing a reminder or advice for something so simple. But photography is a million dynamic things to keep track of.

I learned that it’s important to talk to your model, getting the technical right is simpler than making people feel at ease, but in the end that’s what makes a photo good.

You're spot on. Thanks for sharing your story of working with models and how you need to build to a comfort and trust that leads to the magic. I like to say, that's the difference between 'taking' an image, and 'making' an image. Sometimes making is a collaborative process.

Link | Posted on Dec 8, 2022 at 19:15 UTC
On article One Thing: Becoming a lifelong learner (49 comments in total)
In reply to:

Cheapo Marx: I'll take this as divine intervention giving me a nudge to go ahead and get a 10-16. :-D

Spaghetti Monster works in mysterious ways.

His great noodly light works in mysterious ways.

Link | Posted on Dec 8, 2022 at 17:59 UTC
In reply to:

Martin Datzinger: 1. Turn off any sort of confirmation beeps and the AF assist light
2. Continue with what's comprehensively mentioned in this article

Team no-beep. In photojournalism we aim to be a fly on the wall, remove as much of our presence as possible to try to get to a more candid and truer image. The beep is distraction that announces your presence, altering the scene and changing what is 'real.' We're keenly aware that even our presence changes reality and how people respond and behave, but with time comes trust and a lowering of the shield. The beep only makes it harder to get to that moment.

Link | Posted on Nov 28, 2022 at 21:51 UTC
In reply to:

lightandaprayer: The first change I make to a new camera's settings is enable the rear AF-ON button. (If the camera lacks an AF-ON button I remap the AE-L/AF-L button instead.) I then set autofocus to AF-C with release priority and disable the shutter release autofocus function. I rarely change these settings.

The only things I want the shutter release to do is turn on metering and trip the shutter. Taking these steps are the closest I can get an AF camera to manual focus control without actually using MF.

This is my first move as well. The focus being tied to the shutter leaves me fighting the camera and not focused on the story. It's all preference at the end of the day, for me I always leave my focus point centered and like to focus, meter and then recompose the image. Others may feel this is horrible as it doesn't take advantage of advanced focus systems that have follow focus, eye tracking or object tracking and they're probably right. I'm just stuck in my ways and comfortable.

Link | Posted on Nov 28, 2022 at 21:48 UTC
On article One Thing: A fear of flash flirted with failure (48 comments in total)
In reply to:

Antsl: As a news photographer using Nikon gear, I made a lot of use of Nikon's SC17 TTL sync cord, which is much the same as the Canon offering.

On the bottom of the flash hot shoe is a 1/4" thread that you could use to attach the hot-shoe and flash to a light-stand or a tripod... but what I did was to attach a short hand-strap to that screw hole so that this short loop, with the flash, could easily hang off your hand. It was perfect because you could literally have the flash and the TTL cord connected to the camera, but hanging from your wrist as you focused and zoomed and directed the subject, and then at the last moment you just flicked the flash up into position and you were ready to make the image. I still have that set up.

That is brilliant! All this time and I I'm wondering why I never thought of that or thought to go looking for such a solution. I've definitely dropped a flash or two in my day, luckily haven't ever broken one yet.

Link | Posted on Nov 24, 2022 at 00:01 UTC
On article One Thing: A fear of flash flirted with failure (48 comments in total)
In reply to:

agott123: Here's a gallery I posted a few weeks ago. TTL flash off camera.
https://www.dpreview.com/forums/post/66600729

Nice work! Thanks for sharing it with the DPR community!

Link | Posted on Nov 23, 2022 at 23:59 UTC
Total: 44, showing: 1 – 20
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