Mike Fewster

Lives in Australia Adelaide, Australia
Joined on Oct 13, 2003
About me:

Sony A900, Nex 5, Nex 5n, Rx100, Minolta 5D, Minolta a2, Minolta G4, Konica hexar, Minolta XD7, Mamiya C330, Kodak 290Z

Comments

Total: 146, showing: 1 – 20
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In reply to:

User1234567890: All this to provide photos muddy waxy like current phones they sell?

Not my experience with an Oppo.

Link | Posted on Dec 14, 2021 at 20:02 UTC

Time to sell all my camera gear before suckers realize that it is obsolete.

Link | Posted on Nov 22, 2021 at 20:07 UTC as 36th comment | 2 replies

Time to sell all my camera gear before suckers realize that it is obsolete.

Link | Posted on Nov 22, 2021 at 20:07 UTC as 37th comment
In reply to:

scrup: If Sony continued with A mount, all that extra space ripping out mirror / SLT drive line will free up space for interchangeable sensors.

Different body styles, different sensors.

No. They were an extremely clever way to deal with a problem of the time.

Link | Posted on Nov 15, 2021 at 20:27 UTC

The really exciting possibility is that an Rx100 type body (and/or possibly a little larger) could be made with all the computational goodies and the full sensor utilized. The advances of computational photography rea yet to be utilized in a traditional form body.
imagine an APS-C with the computational stuff loaded.

Link | Posted on Oct 26, 2021 at 19:56 UTC as 65th comment | 4 replies
In reply to:

ZeroOne01: Sony fans,

This article is a comparison for Sports cameras, not price categories. Stop mentioning A1 camera.

If you don't think the A1 is a sports camera you haven't looked at the specs. And it does it all at much higher resolution than both the Canon and the A9.

Link | Posted on Oct 6, 2021 at 21:13 UTC
In reply to:

Fred Mueller: The "art" of photography (if there is such a thing) is seeing in the minds eye the possibility of the end result of a process ... and that process has always been far more extensive (in the film and now digital era) than just the immediate capture. This is why "chimping" a glut of exposures rarely produces a great image as consistently as the "considered" shot: the shot you imagined before you find it somehow in the tumult in front of you. Great photographers operate from an imagined image which they are trying to approach. A given scene rarely presents itself finished and whole. Anything that externalizes (shuts off) internal vision is destructive of the creative process.

I bought a Z50 ... its a pretty good little camera ... but the EVF just bothers me so much ... its an "external" distraction (maybe this R3 EVF less so but I doubt it). I pick up my old D700 and see the world as it is and my mind is free to wander.

Thoughts R Us. Of course you can argue against another person's perspective. For a start, you can give them other evidence. If you believe what you have stated (and I don't think you do) you wouldn't bother participating in forums - and you sure do spend a lot of time filling in your hours on the forums.

Link | Posted on Oct 6, 2021 at 05:44 UTC
In reply to:

Fred Mueller: The "art" of photography (if there is such a thing) is seeing in the minds eye the possibility of the end result of a process ... and that process has always been far more extensive (in the film and now digital era) than just the immediate capture. This is why "chimping" a glut of exposures rarely produces a great image as consistently as the "considered" shot: the shot you imagined before you find it somehow in the tumult in front of you. Great photographers operate from an imagined image which they are trying to approach. A given scene rarely presents itself finished and whole. Anything that externalizes (shuts off) internal vision is destructive of the creative process.

I bought a Z50 ... its a pretty good little camera ... but the EVF just bothers me so much ... its an "external" distraction (maybe this R3 EVF less so but I doubt it). I pick up my old D700 and see the world as it is and my mind is free to wander.

I'd agree with your opening statement, but then I think you miss it. Having made your decisions as to what you will do with the shot (including how you intend post processing) the photographer sets the controls accordingly. With an evf you use the histogram before setting those controls and taking your shot to achieve your previsualized result. You dont have to chimp, usually with blinkies or something like that on, to see if you got it.

Link | Posted on Oct 6, 2021 at 01:39 UTC
In reply to:

Mike Fewster: The op and most of the comments here appear to be made by ovf users who still have not adjusted to how to is an evf. The most important thing about an evf is that you can shoot using a histogram before you take the shot. All the talk here of the new Canon evf being better for pros is nonsense.
The histogram gives control over what the camera well record and that it the control a photographer, pro or otherwise, needs. The Canon feature is OK but it is getting over blown hype here. Tip. Use an evf and use the histogram. Set the evf up so it shows the histogram based on the raw rather than jpeg files. You can do this on Sony and you can probably do it on the other evf camera's as well.

This isn't militancy, it is just pointing out that an evf is used in a different way. Look at all the comments in this thread along the lines of "being able to see the scene as it really is like a pro." That's is true for the way an ovf works. The user has to then make calculations to allow for DR and it is true that a pro can do this. They use their experience. Maybe they will chimp the shot after it has been taken to ensure they got it right. For users like this, it is probably true that the new Canon feature is valuable. Afterall, it is what Canon users have come to expect over a long period. But it isn't the way you use an evf because you have a histogram available to you before you shoot. That histogram can be tuned to RAW or jpeg.
The feature may be fine for viewers coming from OVF, it just isn't how you use evf to get the evf advantages.

Link | Posted on Oct 6, 2021 at 01:31 UTC

The op and most of the comments here appear to be made by ovf users who still have not adjusted to how to is an evf. The most important thing about an evf is that you can shoot using a histogram before you take the shot. All the talk here of the new Canon evf being better for pros is nonsense.
The histogram gives control over what the camera well record and that it the control a photographer, pro or otherwise, needs. The Canon feature is OK but it is getting over blown hype here. Tip. Use an evf and use the histogram. Set the evf up so it shows the histogram based on the raw rather than jpeg files. You can do this on Sony and you can probably do it on the other evf camera's as well.

Link | Posted on Oct 5, 2021 at 21:12 UTC as 20th comment | 10 replies
In reply to:

Photoman: I can't remember how many I sold of these. Government Dept's & Schools ate these up like candy!

Right on. These were revolutionary in schools. I'm in Australia and I was a secondary school teacher. Most schools here bought these and used them for documenting excursions and class projects. This put these cameras into the hands of many many more people than the sales figures alone might suggest. I have always argued that for this reason, this is one of the most important digital cameras ever made. It really opened the possibilities of digital up to a huge audience.

Link | Posted on Oct 5, 2021 at 02:16 UTC
In reply to:

AceofHearts: Whatever. I evaluate the scene prior to raising the camera to my eye. Then, the EVF/OVF is used primarily to compose the shot

If this is how you shoot, you need to investigate using a histogram so you know what your camera is going to record, rather than what you see. Photography is about the recording of what you see. This is the big advantage of evfs. You can see a histogram and control it while taking the shot. Composing is mainly framing and it doesn't matter whether this is ovf or evf. Controlling the dynamic range is guesswork with an ovf.

Link | Posted on Oct 4, 2021 at 22:16 UTC

Total over hype. The big deal about evfs is that you can view a histogram while composing the rather than after the shot has been taken. This enables the photographer to make informed settings. On Sony at least (and maybe on other cameras as well, I don't know) the histogram is conservative in that by default it gives readings for jpegs and if you are shooting RAW, you have more headroom than the histogram indicates. On Sony you can adjust the contrast of the evf independently of the output being used for the exposure. This means you can change the evf so the histogram gives an accurate measure for RAW exposure. I think this is far more useful for a photographer than what Canon is offering,

Link | Posted on Oct 4, 2021 at 22:06 UTC as 51st comment | 6 replies
In reply to:

Ying Yon: its really difficult to understand why Canon and Nikon have waited so long, and are still waiting, to provide reliable silent shutter in cameras? No wonder they are deselected by agencies.

It is simple really. The photographic world by and large still hasn't grasped the change. Photography is no longer a primarily optical technology. It is now an electronics technology. The biggest players will need lots of money and electronics know how, electronics research capacity, electronics manufacturing capacity. The traditional optics based camera companies, if they survive, will make products that are bagged assemblies of the electronics coming from the electronics companies. Canon may, just possibly, be big enough to have the resources to compete in the long run. Nikon already is heavily Sony dependent. I'd guess at an eventual Nikon/Sony merger with the Nikon name being retained.

Link | Posted on Aug 23, 2021 at 21:56 UTC
In reply to:

Raist3d: This goes also to show for all the "oh Canon is late to the mirrorless game" and "M line is a dead end" that Canon seems to know very well what they are doing :-)

I'd have thought it shows that Canon were very late to the mirrorless game. If not, Sony would not have established the beach head they have.

Link | Posted on Aug 9, 2021 at 21:51 UTC
In reply to:

GIALLO63: Pseudo bokeh slightly unnatural

All bokeh is unnatural. It is an effect created by various things within the design of a lens and varies from lens to lens. How an out of focus background is rendered by a digital program is just as "natural" as it is if created by a lens. It is reasonable to say one prefers one bokeh look over another but it isn't reasonable to say one looks more natural than another.

Link | Posted on Jul 27, 2021 at 22:07 UTC
In reply to:

Mike Fewster: This may be just me. Having used tripods with screw fittings for adjusting/locking leg length and others with lever actions, there is no way I'd get a tripod with screw adjustment. Lever lock is so much quicker and more positive. Possibly this reflects my tripod use in the field and when hiking when tripods have to be set up and packed down repeatedly.

I had no idea that screw collars v levers could generate mac/windows excitement.
OK. To each their own. But I have to add to Tilted Plane.... I kind of outrank you there by quite a way. I turn 79 in a couple of months and I started getting serious about photography in my teens.

Link | Posted on Jul 27, 2021 at 07:23 UTC

This may be just me. Having used tripods with screw fittings for adjusting/locking leg length and others with lever actions, there is no way I'd get a tripod with screw adjustment. Lever lock is so much quicker and more positive. Possibly this reflects my tripod use in the field and when hiking when tripods have to be set up and packed down repeatedly.

Link | Posted on Jul 25, 2021 at 22:42 UTC as 31st comment | 8 replies
On article A photographer's guide to buying a smartphone (153 comments in total)
In reply to:

RTC MBP14: One use with smartphone-photography that has not been mentioned here. I use my smart-phone camera to record a location/look during that time of day etc. I can share that or reference it in the future and return to that location with my real camera and capture the image that my mind envisioned. I now have a map, directions, pin and location description saved. I can even create a smart album of favorite photo locations based on my photography purpose (portrait, landscape, street photography).

Yeah. This downhill slide started when we went from our wonderful horses to cars. A real man still prefers a horse.

Link | Posted on Jul 15, 2021 at 22:11 UTC
In reply to:

Fleabag: And you think your digital files are archival? Think again. This is how your images will be lost, you won't be able to read them in the future because that fancy new image format has long disappeared, or your favorite backup provider shut down, was hacked for ransom, or other digital maleficence. Print the images you love on archival paper and they will long outlive you and multiple generations of your family tree.

That's true fleabag. A well constructed will these days has the necessary info for executors. I was executor of an estate a couple of years ago. Lists of online contacts and passwords are essential for responsible management of one's matters.
Last Pass has provision to cover this. Probably the password managers do as well. It is one of the best reasons for using a password manager. It is something we all need to be aware of and not put off doing.

Link | Posted on Jul 14, 2021 at 22:02 UTC
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