TacticDesigns

TacticDesigns

Joined on Jun 23, 2011

Comments

Total: 236, showing: 1 – 20
« First‹ Previous12345Next ›Last »
On article Throwback Thursday: Nikon D70 (220 comments in total)

I picked up a used Nikon D70s back in 2008 after reading about how you could do high speed sync flash on the cheap on the blog of The Strobist.

I already had a dSLR, so I was just getting this Nikon to test out this high speed sync flash thing. LOL. I figured, I'd play around with that, and then that would be it for me and Nikon.

But as I got familiar with the camera, I realized how effective the AF system was. And how nicely laid out the user interface was. It was so logical, sensible and effective.

When my daughter got into gymnastics and cheer, having actually used the Nikon and its AF system, I thought it would be my best bet to get keepers. So I dusted it off and started to chase my daughter around at her competitions.

Since the D70s, I've gotten the D5100, D7000 and now the D750.

Powerful cameras! And lots and lots of keepers!

I'm glad I picked up that D70s just to goof around with high speed sync flash! LOL.

:)

Link | Posted on Mar 30, 2017 at 13:56 UTC as 88th comment | 2 replies

Interesting article. 'actually a topic that's been going through my head lately since the demise of my Canon S90 which left me without a general purpose compact camera for my vacations.

Having the chance to start from scratch, I started looking at things like the Canon G9x with its zoom and the other 1" sensor cameras, but also the Ricoh GR/II and Fujifilm X70 APS-c camera with their 28mm lenses.

So I started keeping an eye on what focal lengths I ended up using most often. On vacation, it was definitely 28mm as I got the standard "here's where we were" shots. But for casual shots, when I used my Tamron 28-75mm zoom on my FF, it was strange how often I ended up at 35mm. It simply "felt right" very often.

I'm wondering if the Ricoh GR/II or Fujifilm X70 would be a great vacation camera. Getting the wide shots to show my family and the environment, but then get to cheat with the ability to crop shots to get the 35mm or 50mm shots I would also tend to sometimes get on vacation.

Link | Posted on Mar 27, 2017 at 13:01 UTC as 202nd comment | 1 reply
In reply to:

TacticDesigns: The 1st time I tried 3D tracking was on my Nikon D5100, getting pics of my daughter and her cheer team at competition.

I had read about 3D tracking, but didn't think I'd use it. But the more I thought about it, the more it seemed perfect for cheer, especially if you're trying to get pics of the whole team, not just one athlete.

Single point won't work because often there is nothing in the middle when you compose the shot to get the whole team. Dynamic won't work because you'll miss too many shots moving the focus point around as you try to get 20-30 shots in under 2 minutes.

So . . . I put the D5100 on 3D Tracking. Picked an athlete. Acquired focus and started tossing the camera around to get the shots I wanted while letting the camera worry about tracking the athlete.

And . . . although the girls only momentarily danced across the measly 11 AF points on my D5100, it simply worked!

The amount of keepers was simply insane! :)

@Uniqumm RE: .... And you were insanely happy!
I can not disagree with that statement! LOL. But . . . you should see me when I'm shooting with my Nikon D750. LOL.
Take care & Happy Shooting!
:)

Link | Posted on Mar 24, 2017 at 14:35 UTC
In reply to:

Jason Haven: Not that I think the GFX is great value, or a camera for my specific purposes. But the GFX spanks the Sony in that low light test if you actually look at multiple ISOs and browse around the test frame. A lot more detail retained, imo.

Frankly these sorts of articles just incite drama in the comment section. I assume it's for ad clicks, which is understandable. Either way, this camera is for certain shooters, most of the FF stuff is for other sorts of shooters, etc. It's nice to have multiple options for different sorts of photographers. :)

+1 to both comments

But I like the article in that it maps out the thought process of moving from one format to another.

This is the type of thinking I was racking my brain over, trying to compare it against the lenses I had, the lenses I was thinking I might get and what I was shooting, when I was deciding whether to get another APS-C camera or go FF.

For those that already know where they would like to get more from their equipment, they have already thought about this a million times, and an article like this is not useful. They already know why they want a particular camera.

For those that haven't thought through changing formats, an article like this is more useful than just saying something like . . . no, you probably won't see a difference.

Take are & Happy Shooting!
:)

Link | Posted on Mar 22, 2017 at 15:04 UTC
In reply to:

fedway: Ironic: the title pompously states, "it should matter to you." Yet, subject tracking only really matters depending on what subjects matter to you. Some of us couldn't care less about shooting weddings, hyperactive children moving around, BIF or sports. All the bandwidth spent on the topic is because of the technical geekiness factor not necessarily due to it's over-all relevance to many people.

@Michel Aristegui ... "How do you know?"
1st I should clarify that I include using single point or center 9 when I said "With these more advanced AF systems, it can be done! :)"

As for thousands, the reason is that I started shooting the other kids in the club.

At 1st, I'd show up to a competition, and take picts of my daughter. The other parents wanted to see what a "big camera" could do, so I'd show them the pics.

Then some of the parents would say ... hey, can you take pictures of my kid? So I did.

And then, I was looking for a way to give back, so I decided to take pictures of all the kids on my daughter's cheer team at their competitions to give out at the end of the year.

And then ... I ended up doing that for my daughter's gymnastics club for a few years with over 100 kids in the club!

And since we needed to select and clean up these pictures to go in the yearbook, trust me, we went through them all. And there were thousands of keepers.

Take care & Happy Shooting!
:)

Link | Posted on Mar 20, 2017 at 12:28 UTC
In reply to:

fedway: Ironic: the title pompously states, "it should matter to you." Yet, subject tracking only really matters depending on what subjects matter to you. Some of us couldn't care less about shooting weddings, hyperactive children moving around, BIF or sports. All the bandwidth spent on the topic is because of the technical geekiness factor not necessarily due to it's over-all relevance to many people.

@fedway

"All the bandwidth spent on the topic is because of the technical geekiness factor not necessarily due to it's over-all relevance to many people."

Actually, being a parent, and getting and using a Nikon with its more advanced AF system and 3D tracking system, I think it really could be relevant to any parent with a kid that does sports.

Imagine, being a parent and simply getting more keepers more easily.

With these more advanced AF systems, it can be done! :)

I have thousands of keepers on my computer!

As a parent, having access to this type of equipment is priceless. :)

Take care & Happy Shooting!
:)

Link | Posted on Mar 19, 2017 at 22:26 UTC
In reply to:

zeratulmrye: Great article. Moving focus point around manually is so outdated.

@LjohnK2

But 3D tracking isn't autoeverything. :)

You still have to tell the camera what you want to track. :)

3D Tracking (At least for Nikon) is somewhere between Dynamic AF (moving the point around manually) and Auto Area (which the camera decides what is in focus.) :)

Take care & Happy Shooting!
:)

Link | Posted on Mar 19, 2017 at 13:26 UTC
In reply to:

Favorable Exponynt: It should matter to us because dpreview thinks camera's should do all the work for us inept incompetent humans who don't get to call themselves photographer.

@Favorable Exponynt,

That is not what 3D tracking is.

That may be what Auto Area AF mode is. ;)

3D Tracking still requires the photographer to tell the camera what to get in focus.

Once you have done that, you, as the photographer, are free to move the camera to get the framing and composition that you want. :)

It's like having a focus assistant that you can delegate that part to as you concentrate on the bigger picture, like composition. :)

Take care & Happy Shooting!
:)

Link | Posted on Mar 19, 2017 at 13:21 UTC

The 1st time I tried 3D tracking was on my Nikon D5100, getting pics of my daughter and her cheer team at competition.

I had read about 3D tracking, but didn't think I'd use it. But the more I thought about it, the more it seemed perfect for cheer, especially if you're trying to get pics of the whole team, not just one athlete.

Single point won't work because often there is nothing in the middle when you compose the shot to get the whole team. Dynamic won't work because you'll miss too many shots moving the focus point around as you try to get 20-30 shots in under 2 minutes.

So . . . I put the D5100 on 3D Tracking. Picked an athlete. Acquired focus and started tossing the camera around to get the shots I wanted while letting the camera worry about tracking the athlete.

And . . . although the girls only momentarily danced across the measly 11 AF points on my D5100, it simply worked!

The amount of keepers was simply insane! :)

Link | Posted on Mar 19, 2017 at 13:14 UTC as 50th comment | 2 replies
On article Throwback Thursday: Our first cameras (391 comments in total)

First camera was a Kodak Instamatic 124, from my parents. It took flash cubes! I still remember my dad warning me . . . let the cubes cool down before you take them off! LOL.

My 2nd camera was my dad's old Pentax SV, when he got a Pentax ME Super. The SV was a manual everything camera. Manual focus. Manual exposure (no auto modes). And not even a built-in light meter. 'Had to use a handheld light meter.

Recently I've set up an old Pentax ist DS camera with a manual focus MC Cosmicar 28mm f/2.8 for my older daughter to learn on. I figured . . . being forced to contend with manual focus, it'll force her to decide . . . what's in focus! ;)

As I was handing it to her, she said, "Great. I can use this for my photography course!" Apparently she signed up for a photography course next year. LOL.

She asked to go out this summer to learn how to use it. I'll show her how to use my Gossen Lunasix F light meter and set the exposure manually. :)

Link | Posted on Mar 16, 2017 at 13:18 UTC as 245th comment
On article Throwback Thursday: Our first cameras (391 comments in total)
In reply to:

EskeRahn: Surprising that none have started with a primitive camera as a child.
My first was a Kodak Instamatic - the ones with a cube flash - I got it about 1970
(I think it was 233 or 133, not sure, I just tried to find it where I thought it were, quite sure it still exists somewhere)

@EskeRahn
+1
Man. I wasn't expecting someone to mention the old flash cubes! My first camera was the Kodak Instamatic 124, with the flash cubes. I remember my dad telling me . . . let the flash cubes cool down before you pull it off! LOL. :)

Link | Posted on Mar 16, 2017 at 12:36 UTC
On article Ask the staff: electronic or optical viewfinder? (891 comments in total)
In reply to:

Rick DeBari: Perhaps you asked the wrong question. Do we even need a viewfinder at all anymore? A good high resolution LED or OLED screen that remains usable in sunlight is much more convenient to use than either an EVF or OVF. The availability of histograms, focus peaking, virtual horizons, rule of thirds grid and most importantly an accurate live view of the image that gives instant feedback of how your exposure choices will look in the final image make makes LED screens, for me at least, the most convenient way to shoot. I do realize that, in certain bright sun situations, a viewfinder may be necessary but I find that 95% of the time I prefer the LED screen for shooting. It frees me to see more of what is going on around me when I'm shooting. I also find that using a viewfinder, particularly on a small DSLR or mirrorless camera, can cause problems when my nose touches either the control buttons or the touchscreen and unexpectedly changes settings while I'm shooting.

Good point!

When shooting my Pentax Q, it's not like I have to debate whether I like OVF or EVF! LOL.

Take care & Happy Shooting!
:)

Link | Posted on Mar 12, 2017 at 14:31 UTC
On article Ask the staff: electronic or optical viewfinder? (891 comments in total)

Has anyone simulated the sweep meter needle from the Pentax K1000 in an EVF yet? To me, that would be a big draw towards EVF. (I'd love that as an overlay on an OVF!)

I use OVF (and love it) because it gets me the shots when I am chasing my daughter around at cheer competitions. And . . . it's what I'm used to . . . having started using cameras with an archaic Pentax SV.

But if someone (Pentax!) would introduce a retro camera, with retro controls and a sweep needle meter in the viewfinder, OVF or EVF, I would go gaga over it. Especially if I could use the old manual focus Pentax lenses my dad gave me.

I guess, being old school, I'd also love a split prism focusing screen as well. Not sure how doable that would be with mirrorless?

Link | Posted on Mar 12, 2017 at 13:01 UTC as 341st comment
On article Throwback Thursday: the Nikon D80 (244 comments in total)

To be honest, seeing the Nikon D80 as a Throw Back Thursday camera really caught me off guard. LOL. When I think of TBT I think of stuff that makes you think, wow that was really cool in its day, or . . . what was everyone thinking about in those days. But the D80, to me, is still a contemporary camera. I'd have no problem picking one up and just using it. :)

Link | Posted on Feb 16, 2017 at 11:39 UTC as 92nd comment | 1 reply
On article CES 2017: Hands-on with Nikon D5600 (322 comments in total)
In reply to:

marc petzold: I can't work with such a small, bad eyecup and especially dim, small pentamirror OVF....for instance, a very old (2006) D80 Nikon OVF is a revelation against these D3x00 & D5x00 series, and further evolved into the D90, D7x00 series then. (100% Viewfinder since the D7000, 2010) A friend does have a D3100, it's OVF is even more tiny then my 2006 Nikon D40, for real. Can't speak for the current D3x00/D5x00, but i need at least a OVF 95% like the D80/D90 to work with - and a pentaprism, not dim pentamirror Viewfinder. The absent of a 2nd dial would also a dealbreaker for myself, one can't simply adjust aperture & shutterspeed faster then with 2 dials into M Mode.

But i'd guess the D5600 would work for many Users - very good IQ into it's class (perhaps the best then) and a small, slim Body, would work great, especially for 1st timers or delicate women hands. ;-)

Not to completely contradict what you are saying, as I too appreciate the additional control points and features of my D7000 and D750 over my D5100, but . . .

I also appreciate how well laid out the D5x00 series is. I still use my D5100 a lot and find it's user interface really, really well thought out. I've set my FN button to ISO, so in manual mode I have easy access to ISO, aperture and shutter speed settings. The "i" menu of the D5x00 series allows really quick access to most of the commonly used settings on the camera in a graphical (not menu) based way, which I find really quick. :) And for anything else I frequently use, I toss it on the "My Menu" feature which quickly lets me get to them with only a couple of button clicks.

As far as the viewfinder, I find it more than enough. Perhaps if I did more manual focusing, I'd need the bigger D750 viewfinder.

So anyone humming and hawing about the D5x00 series, try it out, it really is a well thought out series of cameras. :)

Link | Posted on Jan 6, 2017 at 13:55 UTC
On article Nikon brings its D5600 DSLR to the US (91 comments in total)

Tempting. But my Nikon D5100 still bangs out great pictures.

Probably not a good thing to say as I'm sure Nikon wants everyone with an older camera to upgrade.

But for anyone that wants to just get a camera and use it for a long time . . . might as well just jump in, get one and start clicking! :)

Link | Posted on Jan 4, 2017 at 17:56 UTC as 20th comment | 2 replies
In reply to:

TacticDesigns: Simply an awesome idea.

I could have totally used this a few weeks back when we went to Cedar Point Amusement Park in Ohio.

I could have gotten a bit of video of my daughter, who is only 8, going on one of the huge roller coasters they have there. I could have turned my head every now and then to capture her reaction to the huge drops. LOL.

As it is, no cameras / phones are allowed out while you are riding for obvious reasons. But as long as you have a good head strap, glasses are allowed! ;)

:)

Sometimes its not about MEMORIES. Sometimes its about SHARING.

I think that's the point about Snapchat?

If technology is not for you, that is fine.

Take care & Happy Shooting!
:)

Link | Posted on Sep 29, 2016 at 11:27 UTC
In reply to:

TacticDesigns: Simply an awesome idea.

I could have totally used this a few weeks back when we went to Cedar Point Amusement Park in Ohio.

I could have gotten a bit of video of my daughter, who is only 8, going on one of the huge roller coasters they have there. I could have turned my head every now and then to capture her reaction to the huge drops. LOL.

As it is, no cameras / phones are allowed out while you are riding for obvious reasons. But as long as you have a good head strap, glasses are allowed! ;)

:)

Just curious. Do you have kids? I know for me, as a parent, I enjoyed watching my kid enjoy herself on the roller coaster more than I enjoyed the roller coaster itself. (And I really did enjoy the roller coaster. Millennium Force @ Cedar Point. It's my new favourite roller coaster.) But to me, watching my kid have fun IS the thing to enjoy. And if I could have brought back 10 seconds of my daughter with her hands up in the air going down that big drop to my mom, my mom would have found that hilarious. And you know what, I would have sacrificed 10 seconds to do that for my mom. LOL.

Here's a shot from Dumbo of my older daughter. The ride is slow enough I was allowed to use my camera. We had a lot of fun getting this shot. :)

https://www.flickr.com/photos/tacticdesigns/9254285718/in/album-72157631300869284/

Take care & Happy Shooting!
:)

Link | Posted on Sep 28, 2016 at 11:13 UTC
In reply to:

TacticDesigns: Simply an awesome idea.

I could have totally used this a few weeks back when we went to Cedar Point Amusement Park in Ohio.

I could have gotten a bit of video of my daughter, who is only 8, going on one of the huge roller coasters they have there. I could have turned my head every now and then to capture her reaction to the huge drops. LOL.

As it is, no cameras / phones are allowed out while you are riding for obvious reasons. But as long as you have a good head strap, glasses are allowed! ;)

:)

@BigOne
"JUST ENJOY THE MOMENT!" LOL. Well, there is that too. But it's a vacation, why not take pictures! LOL. Besides ... sometimes its nice to "SHARE THE MOMENT!". Like, my parents aren't up to trekking across the border to go walking around an amusement park all day. But they appreciate me bring back pictures of their grand kids enjoying themselves at an amusement park. :) My mom is always telling me, bring lots of pictures. So I try to do that. :)

Link | Posted on Sep 27, 2016 at 08:13 UTC

Simply an awesome idea.

I could have totally used this a few weeks back when we went to Cedar Point Amusement Park in Ohio.

I could have gotten a bit of video of my daughter, who is only 8, going on one of the huge roller coasters they have there. I could have turned my head every now and then to capture her reaction to the huge drops. LOL.

As it is, no cameras / phones are allowed out while you are riding for obvious reasons. But as long as you have a good head strap, glasses are allowed! ;)

:)

Link | Posted on Sep 26, 2016 at 19:12 UTC as 27th comment | 4 replies
Total: 236, showing: 1 – 20
« First‹ Previous12345Next ›Last »