TacticDesigns

TacticDesigns

Joined on Jun 23, 2011

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Total: 249, showing: 1 – 20
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On article Nikon D850 Review (2114 comments in total)

OMG!

Link | Posted on Aug 24, 2017 at 12:00 UTC as 381st comment
In reply to:

Garug: Yes I understand, they just want to sell more cameras, the marketing people.

Engineers just want to make great cameras.

Maybe the marketing people shuld listen a bit more the enginees and the company that does that is the winner.

Build it and they will come?

You can build the most perfect widget, but if no one wants it, what good is it?

And will it sell?

Marketing, especially when you talk about including market research completes the cycle so that the company can develop a guess at what customers want (or are going to want) and build that.

What is desirable will change with time. It is the goal of the marketing cycle to keep abreast of what is happening and keep making minute changes in the direction of the company. :)

Take care & Happy Shooting!
:)

Link | Posted on Aug 6, 2017 at 23:23 UTC
On article Composition tips: simplification and negative space (85 comments in total)
In reply to:

D200_4me: Keep it simple. Don't follow any rules. Just do whatever looks good for the subject you're shooting and don't worry about it. Some people put way too much philosophy and thought into photography. We're not saving a drowning child here. We're just making photos. That's it. Enjoy it but don't overthink it ;-)

@ D200_4me

Sorry. I mistook your original post as meaning, don't learn the rules. :)

But as far as taking vacation pictures . . . I still find myself fiddling with composition. LOL.

I don't take as much time to get a shot. I will make lots of compromises. But . . . in the end, I still find myself quickly looking around the frame and making minute adjustments.

I find, having learned some composition ideas, it's hard to simply turn it off.

It, to me, is like riding a bike or catching a ball. Once you learn it and you can do it, it is kinda second nature and is almost automatic after a while. :)

So, even though I don't take my dSLR on vacation all the time, even if I'm shooting with my lowly Fujifilm XP80 waterproof camera, I still find myself exploring composition. :)

Take care & Happy Shooting!
:)

Link | Posted on Aug 6, 2017 at 23:15 UTC

We are all "A Target Market of One!" :)

I find marketing interesting. Actually took a few courses at college.

One lesson, the professor pulled out an Ad and asked if we liked it. Everyone agreed it was poorly designed, with regards to design elements. But then he asked us if we would buy the product based on the Ad. We answered no. And then he asked us, if we'd ever buy the product. And then we all said no, because it was for a younger audience. So, he said, you are not the target market. You can't base your impression of an Ad unless you take into account the target audience.

I took that lesson to heart, and think the same way about cameras. If I don't get it, I'm not the target market.

But . . . I don't think if you decide you want a particular feature added to a camera that you are "wrong". You're simply "A Target Market of One!" LOL. So, not feesible to target. But there are some products / services that allow that type of customization. :)

Link | Posted on Aug 6, 2017 at 14:26 UTC as 125th comment
On article Composition tips: simplification and negative space (85 comments in total)

+1

Great post!

I watched the video and loved it!

IMHO . . . the more rules and ideas you learn, the more complex your pictures can become. You don't need to apply each and every single rule you know to every picture. Just pick what you think accentuates the subject you are taking. :)

But negative space is IMHO one of those things that affects most pictures.

Even if you crop into a subject so there is no background, then the elements within the space become the subject, and the space around it can be considered the negative space. LOL.

Take care & Happy Shooting!
:)

Link | Posted on Aug 6, 2017 at 11:56 UTC as 10th comment | 1 reply
On article Composition tips: simplification and negative space (85 comments in total)
In reply to:

D200_4me: Keep it simple. Don't follow any rules. Just do whatever looks good for the subject you're shooting and don't worry about it. Some people put way too much philosophy and thought into photography. We're not saving a drowning child here. We're just making photos. That's it. Enjoy it but don't overthink it ;-)

@D200_4me, in some ways I agree with what you say, and in some ways I don't. I suspect that some composition rules are based off how our brains work, like feeling if something is balanced or not. It is built into us. We don't need to learn it. But to use an analogy. I may know I like Pho Noodle soup. Me liking that dish might be built into me, or it may be learned. But just because I know I like Pho Noodle soup doesn't mean I can make it. LOL. For that, I need a recipe. And even with a recipe, I can't make it as good as the cook at the restaurant. To me, composition tools, are recipes for composition. They are just a starting point to get you thinking in terms of design. Or to be able to explain why you like a picture. But it is not the reason it works. And I suspect, good photographers, like good cooks, once they know the recipe, they can deviate from it and make something better. For me, I struggle just following the recipe to make Pho Noodle soup. And it doesn't even taste good. :(

Link | Posted on Aug 6, 2017 at 11:49 UTC
In reply to:

sh10453: Good job Carey. I'd leave the selfies to the smart phones, though, because they don't serve any rugged testing purposes, but that is me.

As for the wish list, I also add my voice to 1" sensor, aperture priority option, and full manual control option, but I wouldn't want to sacrifice the zoom range.
Thanks for this review.

@sh10453
RE: Selfie. LOL.
But with a bit of seriousness, a couple of the waterproof cameras that I've had, it was a lot harder to do selfies (and show the background), because they only went to a 35mm equivalent focal length. (Fujifilm XP10 and Olympus 850SW.) When I got my Fujifilm XP50 with its 28mm equivalent focal length, it was a lot easier to take selfies! :) I think the latest Olympus TG-xxx series goes to 24mm equivalent focal length? And has a flippy screen. Now . . . that is the selfie waterproof camera! LOL. :)

The other way I look at that is . . . these are great vacation cameras. And when on vacation, having a wide angle lens makes for taking great vista pictures! Perfect for those sunrise / sunset pictures while camping! :)

As for a 1" waterproof camera. Yes. Although I'm waiting for the price to drop down to the $500 mark. In the meantime, I guess I'll keep using my Fujifilm XP80. :)

Link | Posted on Jul 8, 2017 at 13:04 UTC
In reply to:

TacticDesigns: +1. I love waterproof cameras. I have been using them since 2011. I have my Fujifilm XP80 charged up and ready for our camping trip next week.

As for scratching the rear screen, I buy cheap screen protectors and put them on and just replace them as needed.

"But the Olympus Tough TG-5 stands alone in its ability to stand up to the elements and get you photos in situations where no other camera could (or situations where you simply wouldn't be willing to bring a dedicated camera at all)."

But there are more waterproof cameras. There is the Nikon Coolpix W300, Fujifilm's XP series and Ricoh's WG series.

Even though my cellphone takes great pictures, my waterproof camera is simply easier to use to get a picture, and I take it into harsher conditions. So I get more pictures and more dramatic pictures then shooting from dry land with my cellphone.

Even if your cellphone takes great pictures, I think there is a compelling case to have a waterproof camera. :)

@blacklion,

Which Pentax / Ricoh WG cameras did you try?

All the waterproof cameras in this group have small sensors. They are going to be more noisy than a big sensor. I guess Olympus has done 3 things to make things better. BSI sensor. Faster lens (TG-1/2/3/4/5). And now RAW.

The Pentax / Ricoh had the BSI and faster lens on the WG-3/4/5 I believe.

If you tried the other WG-xx cameras, they would have the slower lens. Like my Fujifilm XP.

But, IMHO, it's not IQ that is compelling with these waterproof cameras. It's perspective. I get shots with my waterproof camera that I don't usually (or ever) get with my other cameras. :)

https://www.flickr.com/photos/tacticdesigns/9228264181/in/album-72157631300869284/

Personally, I'd rather have a noisy picture (with a chance to delete it if it just didn't turn out) than to no have a picture. :)

RE: Trying the TG-5. Yes. My buddy got the TG-1 after I told him about it. A quick and responsive camera! :)

Link | Posted on Jul 8, 2017 at 12:56 UTC
In reply to:

Kostas L: The Olympus TG-5 is the best rugged compact you can buy right now, because it is the only new rugged compact you can buy right now.

What about the other waterproof cameras available, like the Nikon Coolpix W300, the Fujifilm XP series or the Ricoh WG series? They are also available new right now. :)

Link | Posted on Jul 8, 2017 at 11:45 UTC

+1. I love waterproof cameras. I have been using them since 2011. I have my Fujifilm XP80 charged up and ready for our camping trip next week.

As for scratching the rear screen, I buy cheap screen protectors and put them on and just replace them as needed.

"But the Olympus Tough TG-5 stands alone in its ability to stand up to the elements and get you photos in situations where no other camera could (or situations where you simply wouldn't be willing to bring a dedicated camera at all)."

But there are more waterproof cameras. There is the Nikon Coolpix W300, Fujifilm's XP series and Ricoh's WG series.

Even though my cellphone takes great pictures, my waterproof camera is simply easier to use to get a picture, and I take it into harsher conditions. So I get more pictures and more dramatic pictures then shooting from dry land with my cellphone.

Even if your cellphone takes great pictures, I think there is a compelling case to have a waterproof camera. :)

Link | Posted on Jul 8, 2017 at 11:37 UTC as 47th comment | 2 replies
In reply to:

Klaus dk: How often didn't we preach "It's not the camera, it's the photographer"? When did anybody ever take that seriously?
Now, thanks to Ion Paciu, there are pictures to show the truth of that statement.

+1

Or take it even further and not even use a dSLR, like Daido Moriyama with a Ricoh GR or Chase Jarvis with his iPhone. :)

Link | Posted on Jul 3, 2017 at 21:26 UTC
On article Olympus TG-5 gallery updated (74 comments in total)
In reply to:

pkcpga: I wish Olympus would come out with a m4/3 or 1" sensor rugged camera, something Sony rx100 sized but durable and waterproof.

@pkcpga
I've been thinking the same thing. For vacation, I really like a small pocketable waterproof camera like my Fujifilm XP80. For non-wet times, I used to use a Canon S90, but I dropped it one too many times. :( Thinking about what to replace my Canon S90 with, I started looking at the Canon G9x and was thinking . . . man . . . if someone would release a 1" waterproof camera, that could cover both of my vacation cameras. I would probably even consider it if it had a fixed 28mm eq. lens. :)

Link | Posted on Jun 18, 2017 at 18:13 UTC
In reply to:

SimenO1: Comments on the article:

1. Sonys linear piezoelectric actuators is not so much about CDAF/PDAF, but battery. It doesn't waste lots of energy on rotation motion. This is a coming technology to DSLR lenses as well.

2. On sensor PDAF will never be as good as dedicated PDAF sensor because of pixel size. On sensor PDAF cant be much larger then 2x2 pixels before it takes away to much information from the image. Having many PDAF-pixels will increase image noise because they block out some of the light.

3. Pentax K-01 had slow AF, partly because of a weak built in motor, but sales failed in Europe and USA because of a different reason: design. In Asia it sold well.

4. One way to accept both a short depth and old lenses is to have a good mount adapter. Yet another way is to allow the rear lens elements to retract into the camera. Pentax had a wide angle lens prototype that used the space inside K-01.

I keep wondering why Pentax hasn't released a retro body with retro controls.

Lots of "retro" lenses out there to take advantage of a body like that.

Even if APS-C. Even if mirrorless. Don't need fast AF for manual focus lenses. :)

Link | Posted on May 25, 2017 at 15:56 UTC
On article Throwback Thursday: Nikon D70 (220 comments in total)

I picked up a used Nikon D70s back in 2008 after reading about how you could do high speed sync flash on the cheap on the blog of The Strobist.

I already had a dSLR, so I was just getting this Nikon to test out this high speed sync flash thing. LOL. I figured, I'd play around with that, and then that would be it for me and Nikon.

But as I got familiar with the camera, I realized how effective the AF system was. And how nicely laid out the user interface was. It was so logical, sensible and effective.

When my daughter got into gymnastics and cheer, having actually used the Nikon and its AF system, I thought it would be my best bet to get keepers. So I dusted it off and started to chase my daughter around at her competitions.

Since the D70s, I've gotten the D5100, D7000 and now the D750.

Powerful cameras! And lots and lots of keepers!

I'm glad I picked up that D70s just to goof around with high speed sync flash! LOL.

:)

Link | Posted on Mar 30, 2017 at 13:56 UTC as 88th comment | 2 replies

Interesting article. 'actually a topic that's been going through my head lately since the demise of my Canon S90 which left me without a general purpose compact camera for my vacations.

Having the chance to start from scratch, I started looking at things like the Canon G9x with its zoom and the other 1" sensor cameras, but also the Ricoh GR/II and Fujifilm X70 APS-c camera with their 28mm lenses.

So I started keeping an eye on what focal lengths I ended up using most often. On vacation, it was definitely 28mm as I got the standard "here's where we were" shots. But for casual shots, when I used my Tamron 28-75mm zoom on my FF, it was strange how often I ended up at 35mm. It simply "felt right" very often.

I'm wondering if the Ricoh GR/II or Fujifilm X70 would be a great vacation camera. Getting the wide shots to show my family and the environment, but then get to cheat with the ability to crop shots to get the 35mm or 50mm shots I would also tend to sometimes get on vacation.

Link | Posted on Mar 27, 2017 at 13:01 UTC as 202nd comment | 1 reply
In reply to:

TacticDesigns: The 1st time I tried 3D tracking was on my Nikon D5100, getting pics of my daughter and her cheer team at competition.

I had read about 3D tracking, but didn't think I'd use it. But the more I thought about it, the more it seemed perfect for cheer, especially if you're trying to get pics of the whole team, not just one athlete.

Single point won't work because often there is nothing in the middle when you compose the shot to get the whole team. Dynamic won't work because you'll miss too many shots moving the focus point around as you try to get 20-30 shots in under 2 minutes.

So . . . I put the D5100 on 3D Tracking. Picked an athlete. Acquired focus and started tossing the camera around to get the shots I wanted while letting the camera worry about tracking the athlete.

And . . . although the girls only momentarily danced across the measly 11 AF points on my D5100, it simply worked!

The amount of keepers was simply insane! :)

@Uniqumm RE: .... And you were insanely happy!
I can not disagree with that statement! LOL. But . . . you should see me when I'm shooting with my Nikon D750. LOL.
Take care & Happy Shooting!
:)

Link | Posted on Mar 24, 2017 at 14:35 UTC
In reply to:

Jason Haven: Not that I think the GFX is great value, or a camera for my specific purposes. But the GFX spanks the Sony in that low light test if you actually look at multiple ISOs and browse around the test frame. A lot more detail retained, imo.

Frankly these sorts of articles just incite drama in the comment section. I assume it's for ad clicks, which is understandable. Either way, this camera is for certain shooters, most of the FF stuff is for other sorts of shooters, etc. It's nice to have multiple options for different sorts of photographers. :)

+1 to both comments

But I like the article in that it maps out the thought process of moving from one format to another.

This is the type of thinking I was racking my brain over, trying to compare it against the lenses I had, the lenses I was thinking I might get and what I was shooting, when I was deciding whether to get another APS-C camera or go FF.

For those that already know where they would like to get more from their equipment, they have already thought about this a million times, and an article like this is not useful. They already know why they want a particular camera.

For those that haven't thought through changing formats, an article like this is more useful than just saying something like . . . no, you probably won't see a difference.

Take are & Happy Shooting!
:)

Link | Posted on Mar 22, 2017 at 15:04 UTC
In reply to:

fedway: Ironic: the title pompously states, "it should matter to you." Yet, subject tracking only really matters depending on what subjects matter to you. Some of us couldn't care less about shooting weddings, hyperactive children moving around, BIF or sports. All the bandwidth spent on the topic is because of the technical geekiness factor not necessarily due to it's over-all relevance to many people.

@Michel Aristegui ... "How do you know?"
1st I should clarify that I include using single point or center 9 when I said "With these more advanced AF systems, it can be done! :)"

As for thousands, the reason is that I started shooting the other kids in the club.

At 1st, I'd show up to a competition, and take picts of my daughter. The other parents wanted to see what a "big camera" could do, so I'd show them the pics.

Then some of the parents would say ... hey, can you take pictures of my kid? So I did.

And then, I was looking for a way to give back, so I decided to take pictures of all the kids on my daughter's cheer team at their competitions to give out at the end of the year.

And then ... I ended up doing that for my daughter's gymnastics club for a few years with over 100 kids in the club!

And since we needed to select and clean up these pictures to go in the yearbook, trust me, we went through them all. And there were thousands of keepers.

Take care & Happy Shooting!
:)

Link | Posted on Mar 20, 2017 at 12:28 UTC
In reply to:

fedway: Ironic: the title pompously states, "it should matter to you." Yet, subject tracking only really matters depending on what subjects matter to you. Some of us couldn't care less about shooting weddings, hyperactive children moving around, BIF or sports. All the bandwidth spent on the topic is because of the technical geekiness factor not necessarily due to it's over-all relevance to many people.

@fedway

"All the bandwidth spent on the topic is because of the technical geekiness factor not necessarily due to it's over-all relevance to many people."

Actually, being a parent, and getting and using a Nikon with its more advanced AF system and 3D tracking system, I think it really could be relevant to any parent with a kid that does sports.

Imagine, being a parent and simply getting more keepers more easily.

With these more advanced AF systems, it can be done! :)

I have thousands of keepers on my computer!

As a parent, having access to this type of equipment is priceless. :)

Take care & Happy Shooting!
:)

Link | Posted on Mar 19, 2017 at 22:26 UTC
In reply to:

zeratulmrye: Great article. Moving focus point around manually is so outdated.

@LjohnK2

But 3D tracking isn't autoeverything. :)

You still have to tell the camera what you want to track. :)

3D Tracking (At least for Nikon) is somewhere between Dynamic AF (moving the point around manually) and Auto Area (which the camera decides what is in focus.) :)

Take care & Happy Shooting!
:)

Link | Posted on Mar 19, 2017 at 13:26 UTC
Total: 249, showing: 1 – 20
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