The Saturnyne

Joined on Feb 6, 2013

Comments

Total: 29, showing: 1 – 20
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In reply to:

The Saturnyne: As a person who lives in a North West town close to Blackburn, i found the full image set on Craig Easton's site deeply stirring. It's a powerful piece of documentary and social commentary of a seriously deprived and overlooked community. That Craig was able to get inside and win the trust of people there to take this set of remarkable photos shows a dedication and compassion and insight that seems to be lacking in others. This is quality work revealing much about an area and its people.

Far too often a person can walk (usually hurriedly) through an area like this and be glad they don't live there and look down on those who do, without even seeing them or connecting with them. Or worst of all, wanting to. We all of us know places like this where we live and we avoid them. But here too, is beauty and love and life and Craig peels away the layers to reveal it. I wish i'd shot these.

"Don't judge a book by its cover" goes the adage. Craig Easton must have made it his mantra.

As with all forms of art, be it photographic or more traditional old styles, its a matter of perspective. What i see above all in these images is an act of love for a wildly varying community of all kinds of people.

I'm just looking at the link you've shared. And they too leave me full of admiration. They aren't the same, though. There is a lament running through Mr Easton's work that is absent in so many other's work. But perhaps i am just biased too? Nevertheless, thank you very much for drawing attention to Oleg Videnin's work. Do you have any others to share? I'd be very much pleased and grateful to see.

Link | Posted on May 4, 2021 at 22:47 UTC

As a person who lives in a North West town close to Blackburn, i found the full image set on Craig Easton's site deeply stirring. It's a powerful piece of documentary and social commentary of a seriously deprived and overlooked community. That Craig was able to get inside and win the trust of people there to take this set of remarkable photos shows a dedication and compassion and insight that seems to be lacking in others. This is quality work revealing much about an area and its people.

Far too often a person can walk (usually hurriedly) through an area like this and be glad they don't live there and look down on those who do, without even seeing them or connecting with them. Or worst of all, wanting to. We all of us know places like this where we live and we avoid them. But here too, is beauty and love and life and Craig peels away the layers to reveal it. I wish i'd shot these.

"Don't judge a book by its cover" goes the adage. Craig Easton must have made it his mantra.

Link | Posted on Apr 16, 2021 at 18:15 UTC as 29th comment | 2 replies

DPReview: "So yeah this camera has all this cool stuff.... world first... class leading... all that cool stuff... etc"

Me: "Amg! It has more dials and stuff on the top! It looks pretty! Take my money NOW Sony! Dials!!!"

DPReview: "...and costs around $6,000 in the US..."

Me: "Oh hello Fujifilm GFX100s. Looking hawt! No ofc i wasn't looking at that Sony. I only ever had eyes for yew!"

Me? Capricious? Yeah, it's all paraphrased somewhat, and i definitely used gratuitous swearing when i saw the price. It's the first Sony camera that i've seen and immediately thought "I wouldn't mind owning that" regretfully followed by "...but not at that price".

Link | Posted on Jan 26, 2021 at 17:27 UTC as 331st comment
In reply to:

EricDH: I haven't used film anymore since I bought my first digital camera, but I have fond memories on the processes around using film. Two family friends (more my dad's age, so quite some in photography) had darkrooms. Developing the film in a Paterson tank was fun already. But really special were the evenings in the darkroom. It was a very laborious process. After a full evening we had a handful good prints. So I would never go back to that I think, looking at how much easier digital is. But the sense of exitement will always be with me in my memory.

My exact same thoughts on the joys and labours of darkroom printing. I learnt developing at college, bought my own darkroom setup, and then spent entire evenings making my kitchen lightproof, developing, printing, and then packing it all back up again. All for making half a dozen 8x10 prints at most. I'm glad for the experience and the memories are to be treasured, but again, like you, i'd never go back to that.... although... were someone to lend or give me a medium or large format camera... i'd find it hard to resist... if i could leave all the developing and printing to a professional.

Link | Posted on Jan 24, 2021 at 15:55 UTC
In reply to:

Corot2: Great camera. My favorite of all time. Sad how Seattle has been destroyed. As a native who left, very sad. Soon Joe can go home

I've never visited the USA, DPFranz, but you and Barney make me want to visit Seattle if i do.

Link | Posted on Jan 11, 2021 at 14:06 UTC
On article Canon EOS R5 review (2966 comments in total)
In reply to:

igmcg: body only in scotland

£4,199.00
= $3899?????

Even with a weaker £, this is a mockery. I was seriously considering buying the R5 this year, but something about the pricing just makes me feel like we here in the U.K. are the butt of some joke.

Link | Posted on Jul 9, 2020 at 14:09 UTC
On article Fujifilm 55-200mm F3.5-4.8 sample gallery (111 comments in total)
In reply to:

The Saturnyne: I own both the 50-140 and the 55-200 for landscape shooting. And the one i'm planning to sell is the 50-140. It may have the weather sealing and as 2.8, but it's bulky and heavy and doesn't have quite the same reach and rarely gets out of the house on trips. I bought the 55-200 refurbished from Fujifilm and i've never once had problems with it. It's probably my most used lens. If i decide to move up to full frame cameras this year, it and my X-H1 will be the only things i keep... maybe the 14mm and the 35mm too... not a huge fan of Fuji's wider zooms, though (not always for optical reasons). And so i'm looking at other camera brands for those kinds of shots.

A camera is like any other artist's tool, i think. No painter chooses just one brush or colour. Some won't even restrict themselves to one medium. I know brand loyalty is a big thing for many people and that's fine, i'll certainly always love Fujifilm. But i suspect i want some things that Fujifilm cannot provide with their crop sensor camera and lenses at this point in time. A period of reflection, i think, for now. When buying expensive things, the first question one should always ask is "Yeah, but do i really need it?" With that in mind, other questions like weight, lens sharpness, ability to print above A1... all require some thought and balance. Perhaps i'll decide that an "upgrade" isn't really an upgrade after all... (although i'd still like to get my hands on a GFX... i do really like to print big for my exhibitions)
Thank you for your kind word, DrewRick.

Link | Posted on May 7, 2020 at 05:50 UTC
On article Fujifilm 55-200mm F3.5-4.8 sample gallery (111 comments in total)

I own both the 50-140 and the 55-200 for landscape shooting. And the one i'm planning to sell is the 50-140. It may have the weather sealing and as 2.8, but it's bulky and heavy and doesn't have quite the same reach and rarely gets out of the house on trips. I bought the 55-200 refurbished from Fujifilm and i've never once had problems with it. It's probably my most used lens. If i decide to move up to full frame cameras this year, it and my X-H1 will be the only things i keep... maybe the 14mm and the 35mm too... not a huge fan of Fuji's wider zooms, though (not always for optical reasons). And so i'm looking at other camera brands for those kinds of shots.

Link | Posted on May 1, 2020 at 19:23 UTC as 28th comment | 2 replies
In reply to:

The Saturnyne: Having seen reviews of the bag online, i am very taken with it. I own a Shimoda 40l and it's the best camera bag for a day-long trek i've ever owned. Just nudging my F-Stop backpack into a very close 2nd place. But... it lacked a few things, and the 50l version absolutely ticks all the boxes missing from the 40l. The only thing that is going to stop me from going with this on Kickstarter is the absurdly expensive import duty i'd STILL have to pay, plus the possibility of the upcoming Brexit insecurity.
Hopefully somewhere in the UK will be selling these, because Europe will be as much of a burden to order from as the USA soon, it seems. Already my camera gear has become more expensive, but who knows... and that's the problem.... nobody knows.

Thanks Ian.
Wow you must be busy. I've seen you replying to people all over the place.

That is deeply appreciated. Even if you're not all the same person, although i kinda suspect you are =)

Link | Posted on Oct 31, 2019 at 17:18 UTC

Having seen reviews of the bag online, i am very taken with it. I own a Shimoda 40l and it's the best camera bag for a day-long trek i've ever owned. Just nudging my F-Stop backpack into a very close 2nd place. But... it lacked a few things, and the 50l version absolutely ticks all the boxes missing from the 40l. The only thing that is going to stop me from going with this on Kickstarter is the absurdly expensive import duty i'd STILL have to pay, plus the possibility of the upcoming Brexit insecurity.
Hopefully somewhere in the UK will be selling these, because Europe will be as much of a burden to order from as the USA soon, it seems. Already my camera gear has become more expensive, but who knows... and that's the problem.... nobody knows.

Link | Posted on Oct 17, 2019 at 00:48 UTC as 6th comment | 2 replies
On article Fujifilm X-T30 review (1073 comments in total)

I bought the X-H1 before Christmas and the Q button placement on that has annoyed me frequently. It was fine on the X-T2. My thumb could get to it far more easily than the recessed one on the X-H1. This looks worse. Pity really. Seems like a great camera, but it's often the little niggly things like that, that can spoil the experience. (I do love my X-H1, though. Just not that Q button).

Link | Posted on Apr 17, 2019 at 19:22 UTC as 96th comment | 5 replies
On article DPReview TV: Fujifilm X-H1 Review (520 comments in total)
In reply to:

(unknown member): I didn’t watch this video, though I did watch the previous one out of curiosity. So my question to the DPR community is this: What do we learn from these videos that we don’t learn from the written reviews? Looking forward to the replies ;)

You're an adult, Richard. As an adult, you can surely appreciate that there are multiple ways to learn about a thing. The very fact that you are looking at a computer screen or- heaven forfend- a new-fangled smartphone or tablet, should tell you we are no longer learning things by looking at pictures painted on the walls of a cave. I own books by the likes of Jeff Schewe, yet I still go to Phlearn on Youtube if I want to learn about something quickly about Photoshop or Lightroom. There's plenty of people out there who are dyslexic or just struggle learning from printed words. Or just prefer this format.

And this is why you should get behind these videos and support them and the people who prefer them. You still have your written reviews. Why would you or anyone deny someone else what you already take for granted? =)

Link | Posted on May 7, 2018 at 09:29 UTC
In reply to:

h2k: Well, i very much prefer written content and i don't want to be "entertained" in a style tailored for kindergarden dwellers. Let's hope that all information spread by these Youtube personalities (meant without a bias, honestly) would also be available as text.

As a person who absorbs and learns quicker with visual means than written, I've appreciated TCS reviews immensely.

So now DPreview has something for everyone. So suck it up (meant without bias, honestly...)

Link | Posted on Apr 28, 2018 at 18:55 UTC

Is there an option for more padded waist straps than the one shown? If you're walking with a load, it does increase the comfort somewhat. Also height adjustable harness would be nice in a version. Although I've gotten more used to my F-Stop Ajna, it is definitely aimed at taller people than myself. At first glance at least, this does look kinda nice and may replace one of my Osprey's for casual trekking.

*goes off to kickstarter to look*

Link | Posted on Apr 23, 2018 at 18:20 UTC as 3rd comment
In reply to:

Michael McCulley: I volunteer at a 34,000 acre County Operated park in AZ, that includes close to 100 miles of trails, less than 10 miles of road ways, multiple campgrounds for RVs, Tents, along with scores of picnic areas. Elevations changes range up to 1800 feet. Often there are many thousands of people are in the park along with dogs, horses.. Wildlife includes Raptors, Mtn. Lions, along with other wild 4 legged species not to mention the other critters that comes with a desert environment. The park is located more than 30-40 minutes response by emergency vehicles. Drones are NOT ALLOWED. Although privacy issues abound at this park at any given time, the PRIMARY issue with drones is the fact that there are dozens of helicopter rescues we have each year. A large percentage are not announced and 99% of rescues are more than 45 minutes hiking distance away from any road access in addition to drive time getting to the park. Helicopter RESCUE protocols are hard & not negotiable > no DRONES !

Having seen the way people have a self-entitled right to do what they want, i too would be telling drone pilots to keep away. There may well be a lot of law-abiding citizens who fly drones, but the few... the few always, without fail try and go beyond what's decent and respectful. We've already had near-misses at major airports by people flying drones close to passenger planes at landing and take-off.

It's the same kind of entitled selfishness that gets people shot by lunatics in schools, or allows laser pens to be bought and sold and used on airplanes. Respect parks. Respect wildlife. Respect privacy. Respect the emergency services. Is that too difficult to understand, Vadims?

Link | Posted on Mar 26, 2017 at 02:08 UTC
In reply to:

donCortizone: I've never seen more whining over a non-issue than the complaints about the ISO control.

"Woah woah woah, you mean I have to LIFT IT UP AND TURN IT?!?"

It's certainly easier than pressing a dedicated button and keeping your eye to the finder to make sure you've pressed it properly, and then spinning the miniature dial on the back of the camera to move your ISO to where you want it. Good on Fuji for implementing the change. Total bandwagon complaint issue.

Who would have thought that people could get so worked up about such a small thing. The outrage that someone thinks differently and doesn't immediately jump on the bandwagon and instead remarks upon their experiences. Lighten up. It's an ISO dial. Those of us who don't like it simply note it and move on. Yet those of us who do, seem to scream blue murder. like you've stabbed a relative. It IS however, worth remarking on, because for that amount of money, you want to feel comfortable using the camera.

Incidentally, the friend I sold mine to absolutely loves it, what with being right eyed/handed, unlike me and not having his nose pressed up against the lcd screen when taking pictures... but he is having LOADS of problems with it, including some fault with the eyepiece... (there appears to be a design flaw with it?), but on the upside, Fujifilm UK have been absolutely excellent in dealing with his problems so far.

Shall we talk about Rhein II next, just for fun?

Link | Posted on Feb 8, 2017 at 06:34 UTC
In reply to:

donCortizone: I've never seen more whining over a non-issue than the complaints about the ISO control.

"Woah woah woah, you mean I have to LIFT IT UP AND TURN IT?!?"

It's certainly easier than pressing a dedicated button and keeping your eye to the finder to make sure you've pressed it properly, and then spinning the miniature dial on the back of the camera to move your ISO to where you want it. Good on Fuji for implementing the change. Total bandwagon complaint issue.

Having owned the x-pro2 a while, I found the iso dial impractical to use in certain conditions. It's the little things that can really turn people off a purchase. (Or on- I absolutely love the sound of the shutter). The x-pro2 is a joy to use, but the iso dial is fussy, and hard to read, especially in poor lighting. No it's not that hard to work around, but it's just annoying and not quite practical. Being able to change iso from the front dial is very much welcome on a camera that I revere.

Link | Posted on Feb 1, 2017 at 17:14 UTC

I only hope that the Tilopa is easier to use than the Ajna. The ICU is a real pain to attach to the frame. The padding in the hips and shoulder straps is incredibly insufficient, The other straps... these straps puzzle me enormously. They loosen. Really easily with a little pressure. To the point i daren't risk my tripod on walks with it. My Lowepro Flipside doesn't. Maybe I got a duff backpack because I really wanted to like mine. Also the attachment points if you want to slot your tripod bag to the rear, seem to be lacking somewhat.

But to be honest, worst of all is the service. The customer service, while courteous and polite, promised me 3 times for a specific week of delivery. I think I waited nearly 4 months.

Maybe the Tilopa is everything mine isn't. The idea is perfect. A combination backpack with room for both camera and hiking necessities. I'd have sent mine back if there wasn't the risk of being stiffed, though.

Link | Posted on Dec 12, 2016 at 02:56 UTC as 8th comment
In reply to:

brettmeikle: Yet consuming resources at a rate far in excess of environmental sustainability whilst wrecking remote (to the US) ecosystems like the Great Barrier Reef is OK, an aspiration even? I'm not defending these lads, but look in the mirror people - it's footprints, not mountain top removal, melting ice and ocean acidification.

It always starts with small things. I mean, there you are with a farm beside a wood. What does it matter if you chop a few trees down to make a garage or little holiday cottage? ...and little by little, you find that the pretty wood is encroached upon more and more until it's just a stand of trees. If you're lucky, you might have pictures taken by a photographer of how glorious the place once looked... You might even have regret, but by then it's too late. Trees and creatures that have spent hundreds, and even thousands of years living peacefully and getting on doing their own thing can easily be removed in a single day... and it all starts with comments and thoughts like "well no one gives a toss about this little patch of fungus, surely?"

The whole planet needs protecting from humans. And it has to start with and include the stuff that we think is beneath our notice. Apologies if that sounds preachy, but we are connected to the small things, too. Wishing you well.

Link | Posted on Nov 10, 2016 at 22:58 UTC

Did anyone say if it was leaf shutter lenses?

Link | Posted on Sep 19, 2016 at 17:39 UTC as 67th comment
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