Chillbert

Lives in United States United States
Works as a Software designer
Joined on Oct 17, 2009

Comments

Total: 67, showing: 1 – 20
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Fascinating video - thanks for posting! I was glad to get a quick tour of what this strange blend of familiar items (ThinkPads!) and the somewhat alien environment of a space station. I can now more easily imagine some aspects of the life of an astronaut up there. Works for me, whether or not the art of videography was fully mastered in the process.

Link | Posted on Nov 1, 2016 at 17:26 UTC as 11th comment
On article Apple revamps MacBook Pro lineup, adds 'Touch Bar' (871 comments in total)
In reply to:

NDT0001: Wouldn't it have been better to just replace the 2 god-awful thunderbolt connections in the current MacBooks with USB-c and keep the 2 existing usb3 connections? It would save the massive inconvenience of having to adapt.... EVERYTHING...

I'm guessing they couldn't fit the bigger USB slots in the thinner body. Basic design decision. We'll see if that pays off or not once someone actually uses one.

Link | Posted on Oct 28, 2016 at 02:23 UTC
On article Apple revamps MacBook Pro lineup, adds 'Touch Bar' (871 comments in total)
In reply to:

Angrymagpie: This article does not answer the most important question: what's going to happen if you plug four chargers into the four ports?

It being Apple, they probably thought about that, and wrote software to handle it.

Link | Posted on Oct 28, 2016 at 02:19 UTC
On article Apple revamps MacBook Pro lineup, adds 'Touch Bar' (871 comments in total)
In reply to:

alexzn: A very disappointing update, rather iterative on the existing hardware. I was expecting at least the bezel-less screen like the new Dell laptop. Older processors, the mess with RAM. The port situation is another downer. The crippled standard configurations (who buys a premium laptop with 8Gb of RAM today???) is an added insult. Just like the iPhone 7, best to skip.

Anyone care to share some facts about how in practice this is falling behind? Preferably not just raw specs - in my experience Apple's tight hardware-OS-application integration still dances circles around higher spec'ed machines.

Link | Posted on Oct 28, 2016 at 02:19 UTC
On article Apple revamps MacBook Pro lineup, adds 'Touch Bar' (871 comments in total)
In reply to:

XeroJay: I can't believe the hate on here... I'm truly dumbfounded by the number of people here who don't see the value in TB3. Oh well, give it a year and they'll all be hating on MS's new ridiculously overpriced surface studio when it can't run any of the Thunderbolt or even USB-C devices that will have taken over the world by then. Not to mention the speed of the storage options that TB3 already offers...
You know what, in going to set a reminder to revisit this thread in a year's time.

I agree - seems like a lot of whining to me, and a distinct lack of curiosity. But I guess instant judgement is what it's about around here.

Link | Posted on Oct 28, 2016 at 02:17 UTC
On article Apple revamps MacBook Pro lineup, adds 'Touch Bar' (871 comments in total)
In reply to:

exTEMP180: Soon our laptops will fit in our pockets and we'll use our laptop bags to hold our adaptors/ters.

It depends. With the great battery life and light weight of current laptops, a lot of people can truly just carry and use a naked laptop for several hours, without carrying even a charger. Of course if you're doing certain things, then you need accessories. For professional photographers, do you really travel with just a laptop on its own ever? I am sorry to see the SD card reader go - really love it being there all the time - but the reality is with the data size of photos and videos now, I can't do much with photos anyway without an external drive anyway, so for those times I end up carting a bag... Seems like a reasonable trade off for a lot of the population and maybe not that different than today for photographers in practice.

Link | Posted on Oct 28, 2016 at 02:15 UTC
On article Apple revamps MacBook Pro lineup, adds 'Touch Bar' (871 comments in total)
In reply to:

Gesture: Wow. Touch bar. INVENTED by Apple. Might win a Nobel prize.

Love the curiosity! The current laptop format (functional design and form) has seen very few fundamental improvements aside from miniturization in the last 20 years. This is a significant new user interface, tightly integrated with different apps. Don't you at least want to TRY it before passing judgement?

Link | Posted on Oct 28, 2016 at 02:11 UTC
On article Throwback Thursday: Fujifilm F10 (121 comments in total)

I own three of these for myself and my kids - the original F10, an F30, and an F31. Any suggestions on what to do with them?

Link | Posted on Oct 13, 2016 at 13:07 UTC as 76th comment | 2 replies
On article Hands-on and in-depth with the Sony a6500 (553 comments in total)
In reply to:

Kashim: The article says "an electronic shutter option allows the camera to shoot above this limit". Does that mean the camera has a fully electronic shutter as well as a mechanical shutter?

and I think I read somewhere that you can switch to the fully electronic shutter for near-silent shooting, at a much reduced continuous shooting rate (3fps?)

Link | Posted on Oct 12, 2016 at 00:48 UTC
On article Hands-on and in-depth with the Sony a6500 (553 comments in total)
In reply to:

Chillbert: Can someone tell me why IBIS is such a big deal? Is it mostly about getting value from existing (older) lenses? Sony E-mount is my first system and most of my lenses already have OSS. Forgive my ignorance - just interested in learning how people really use these cameras.

@vadims - thanks for the 24/1.8 Zeiss example!
@RolliPoli, thanks also for your suggestions on K mount - I had no idea. Nikon is already in my sights. A little hard to take the plunge but I guess so long as I am happy with Sony backs I have a lot of flexibility.

Link | Posted on Oct 12, 2016 at 00:46 UTC
On article Hands-on and in-depth with the Sony a6500 (553 comments in total)
In reply to:

Chillbert: Can someone tell me why IBIS is such a big deal? Is it mostly about getting value from existing (older) lenses? Sony E-mount is my first system and most of my lenses already have OSS. Forgive my ignorance - just interested in learning how people really use these cameras.

Thanks everyone. (My best lens so far is the Sony 35 f/1.8 OSS, so it won't help much there obviously.) I do sometimes hanker after a better macro option, for nature close-ups mostly... I guess IBIS would help with a used manual-focus macro lens. If you were starting with no legacy lenses as I am, which lens mount/family would you pick to optimize for best lens selection?

Link | Posted on Oct 8, 2016 at 16:12 UTC
On article Hands-on and in-depth with the Sony a6500 (553 comments in total)

Can someone tell me why IBIS is such a big deal? Is it mostly about getting value from existing (older) lenses? Sony E-mount is my first system and most of my lenses already have OSS. Forgive my ignorance - just interested in learning how people really use these cameras.

Link | Posted on Oct 7, 2016 at 13:59 UTC as 50th comment | 7 replies
On article Hands-on and in-depth with the Sony a6500 (553 comments in total)
In reply to:

nametaken: This seems like a wonderful camera, but I wonder why they continue with this form factor. I mean I like it for my a6000 - having a capable camera that's portable enough to take more places than a DSLR is nice - but I feel like the type of people who would use all of these new features are the type that would also appreciate a larger battery, more buttons, more memory card slots, and other advantages a big body can offer. So why not include this in an a3000-like body (and using some of that extra space for a bigger battery)?

There's plenty of small bodies in this lineup now, so why not another big one like the a3000 (only more serious)? I feel like the true advantage to mirrorless isn't just that it can be smaller than DSLRs, but that you have the OPTION to stay small OR go big as needed while staying within the same system.

To me, the compact form factor is a massive "feature". It means I can carry a super capable camera and one or two spare lenses in a small bag that I can lug anywhere and fits at the bottom of my in-flight carry-on, etc. I have been doing so for several years, and I have no intention of buying a bigger camera again, at least not unless I get a very significant increase in capability (A7*?)

Link | Posted on Oct 7, 2016 at 13:45 UTC

Very attractive option. As a non-pro Sony NEX user, I am already getting a lot of value out of the Sony 35/18. It does take some lovely photos, despite its apparent limitations. Anyway, now I have Sigma envy!

Link | Posted on Sep 13, 2016 at 17:17 UTC as 30th comment
In reply to:

717: If you can find one, the Cessna Cardinal has no wing struts to get in the way. The Cessna Cardinal RG (retractable gear) also has no landing gear to get in the way. Do not let your arms touch the window frames if you can help it, this tends to transmit aircraft vibrations to the camera. Another thing is the air blast - my Sony 717 had no issues at all being held outside the airplane, but my current Nikon needs to be shielded from the air or the lens vibrates enough to ruin the photos. In the USA at least, $150-250 should get you an hour of time in the air in a fixed wing aircraft. You would look for "flying lessons" or "aircraft rental", very few places will advertise photography. Make sure and ask if any pilots specialize in photo flights - some pilots love it and some have no clue what a photographer needs.
When I was flying for a living I was overjoyed to get photographers. It was a lot of fun and beat hauling a box from A to B any day.

Thanks - very informative!

Link | Posted on Aug 15, 2016 at 20:22 UTC

As a Sony NEX 5n owner, it's very disappointing to me that the newer Sony cameras lack a touch screen, making focus point selection so clunky. I guess the video overheating "feature" is something they did decide to continue though :-)

Link | Posted on Aug 15, 2016 at 20:18 UTC as 47th comment | 2 replies
On article Medium-format mirrorless: Hasselblad unveils X1D (1179 comments in total)
In reply to:

blurredvision: Why exactly is the price increase so dramatic for such small increase in sensor size?

In addition to the non-linear costs of scaling up sensors, the lower production volumes of a camera like this probably have a significant impact on price.

Link | Posted on Jun 27, 2016 at 17:00 UTC
On article Setting new standards: Nikon D5 Review (493 comments in total)
In reply to:

johnschafer: I'm sorry, but I'm at the point where I'm done with DPR's very obvious Nikon bias. I really don't want to start a negative rant here. But come on, honestly, I must protest. DPR admits in a separate article of the D5's lowest base ISO dynamic range of any current FF Nikon DSLR. Further, look at FStoppers review of the D5. It is very clear to see the D5 hits its useful limit at ISO25600. Here at DPR if this was a Canon-equivalent pro DSLR, it would be demoted to Silver award. Further, DPR hasn't reviewed a Canon 1D-series in 6 years. Nikon D5 is a Silver award, nothing more.

I thought DPR was meant to be pathologically Sony-biased. Maybe they're just anti-Canon?

Link | Posted on Jun 2, 2016 at 16:48 UTC
In reply to:

Chillbert: What is the practical difference between the Pentax Pixel-Shift mode and multi-exposure averaging such as Sony's "Hand-Held Twighlight" mode, which takes multiple shots in quick succession and averages them in-camera? I have a good old Sony NEX 5n and have used the Hand-Held twighlight mode very successfully for night-time shots, for example. But in principle it could also be used for landscape photography to oversample the scene with similar time lag to Pentax's Pixel-Shift mode. I'm not trying to say Sony is superior, just trying to understand how these approaches compare. (Similarly, presumably one could take multiple exposures in burst mode or manually on a high-end camera like the Nikon 810 if it doesn't have that built in.)

EDIT: Note: I understand the technical difference, I'm trying to understand the functional differences.

One minor "pro" for the Sony Nex approach is that it can be used without a tripod/hand-held (albeit for non-moving subjects).

Extrapolating... If you did multiple exposures RAW on a Nikon D810, e.g., manually, presumably you'd be able to reduce some noise, but would not be able to enhance the resolution.

Link | Posted on May 9, 2016 at 17:23 UTC
In reply to:

Chillbert: What is the practical difference between the Pentax Pixel-Shift mode and multi-exposure averaging such as Sony's "Hand-Held Twighlight" mode, which takes multiple shots in quick succession and averages them in-camera? I have a good old Sony NEX 5n and have used the Hand-Held twighlight mode very successfully for night-time shots, for example. But in principle it could also be used for landscape photography to oversample the scene with similar time lag to Pentax's Pixel-Shift mode. I'm not trying to say Sony is superior, just trying to understand how these approaches compare. (Similarly, presumably one could take multiple exposures in burst mode or manually on a high-end camera like the Nikon 810 if it doesn't have that built in.)

EDIT: Note: I understand the technical difference, I'm trying to understand the functional differences.

Great answers - thank you both. In sum, the Pentax method enhances resolution and supports RAW; the Sony (Nex 5) method should be able to achieve as good if not better signal-to-noise ratio, but JPEG only and with resolution not enhanced and possibly slightly reduced (owing to blurring at the pixel boundaries). Makes sense

Link | Posted on May 9, 2016 at 17:15 UTC
Total: 67, showing: 1 – 20
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