Chillbert

Lives in United States United States
Works as a Software designer
Joined on Oct 17, 2009

Comments

Total: 122, showing: 1 – 20
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In reply to:

Kostasm: I wish there was a Design Police and immediately arrest Tim Cook and his team for this crime against all logic. Why not below the screen guys? Why this crazy mess that ruins the amazing processor achievements?
I will buy it though and wait for a proper app that disables extra pixels next to notch. (Apple's compatibility mode is yet another bad joke as it shrinks the whole area instead of vertical only reduce!)

Maybe look at it as free extra pixels around the camera and you'll live a happier life.

Link | Posted on Nov 5, 2021 at 15:17 UTC
In reply to:

TheLinguist: Always a new way to increase the price each year by an extra $200.

But who am I kidding, I’ll buy it

While Apple has no control over your artistic abilities, not only are photos getting technically better overall, but smart phone cameras are getting a lot better in specific areas such as low-light photography, astrophotography, and presumably with image stabilization reducing camera shake. Overall, the best smartphones are making photography easier, more accessible, and more foolproof in terms of technique.

Link | Posted on Jun 1, 2021 at 20:09 UTC
In reply to:

achill3s: I guess this phone will be $1,500+. $1,500 for a little rectangle that will be intentionally obsoleted in 3 years if the battery lasts that long or you don't shatter the screen by looking at it funny... But yeah, phones are SUCH A GREAT VALUE!!!

If you divide the price you pay for your phone over the number of hours you choose to use it, or the number of discrete tasks you use it for, it's hard to argue that it is grossly overpriced. And iPhones have pretty good reliability overall. If you disagree, you can always buy a cheaper phone.

Link | Posted on Jun 1, 2021 at 20:04 UTC
In reply to:

Txoni: Strange to have this news on a photography related site, yet not a single reference is made to photography, its cameras, sensor technology nor lenses.

@badi, such negative thinking... anyone with a Mars lander can do it!

Link | Posted on Mar 31, 2021 at 17:53 UTC
In reply to:

Txoni: Strange to have this news on a photography related site, yet not a single reference is made to photography, its cameras, sensor technology nor lenses.

This flight, if successful, will lay the ground for an entire new industry of Martian drone photography.

Link | Posted on Mar 25, 2021 at 19:29 UTC

To make it even less practical, it could have interchangeable lenses!

Link | Posted on Oct 19, 2020 at 21:31 UTC as 3rd comment
On article Opinion: Camera names are getting ridiculous (706 comments in total)

The camera makers could learn a lesson from IKEA who solved this problem by giving its vastly larger catalog of products unique Swedish names. On the surface the names seem (and are) a little ridiculous in English, but the net result is that you can search for information on IKEA products by name and have a decent chance of finding relevant info on your first attempt.

Link | Posted on Oct 12, 2020 at 15:00 UTC as 87th comment | 1 reply
In reply to:

SolidMetal: I literally can't wait the day when big MILC manufacturers go after computational photography. They could widen the gap again with smartphones, and - let's face it - they have to, if they don't want to go extinct. Give me at least a decent in-camera HDR for a start, without mechanical shutter between each shot and lots of artifacting.

But can the camera firms build good enough computing platforms to keep up with Apple, Google, and the open source software world? Camera manufacturers haven't yet mastered the art of software platform development. It's very hard to build great software unless (among other things) you are building it on a scaled platform that serves a very large market, justifying massive ongoing investment and iteration.

Link | Posted on Jun 3, 2020 at 16:58 UTC
In reply to:

Chillbert: There is no inherent reason the benefits of DSLR or MILC can't be combined with the computational photography methods pioneered in smartphones. I would be interested to learn more about what computational photography capabilities and platforms camera manufacturers have developed or are developing.

@mermaidkiller, I disagree that smartphones are overhyped - you can take great pics with them in many conditions, in a format that you always have with you, with instant sharing, etc. But even so, computational photography has many applications beyond smartphones including using all the powerful capabilities of larger cameras.

Link | Posted on Jun 3, 2020 at 16:55 UTC

There is no inherent reason the benefits of DSLR or MILC can't be combined with the computational photography methods pioneered in smartphones. I would be interested to learn more about what computational photography capabilities and platforms camera manufacturers have developed or are developing.

Link | Posted on Jun 3, 2020 at 15:49 UTC as 86th comment | 3 replies
In reply to:

Yxa: Where will it end?

@MyReality you misunderstand the problem with covid19. Aside from the fact it is already in fact the leading cause of death in the US, in parts of the country where there have been significant outbreaks, they were recently on the brink of their hospital systems collapsing. That would greatly increase the mortality rate beyond its current lethal rate. No other current leading causes have the potential to cause that level of devastation. None of us *want* to be socially distanced, but many of us understand it's necessary to prioritize disease management over virtually everything else, or both health and economic damage will be that much worse.

Link | Posted on Jun 3, 2020 at 15:24 UTC
In reply to:

spider-mario: Frankly, I am rather appalled by the amount of victim blaming and lack of empathy in this comment section. (Not by everyone, fortunately.)

Completely agree

Link | Posted on May 22, 2020 at 18:40 UTC
In reply to:

AlterZgo: Part of passing this AP test is to see if you are smart enough to know how to change the setting on your iPhone to submit your answer as a .jpg file.

Utter codswallop

Link | Posted on May 22, 2020 at 18:38 UTC
In reply to:

dccdp: "Your next computer is not a computer". It is a tablet. Which is a computer.

Marketing will never look the same.

I laughed at your comment... and at the same time I think it's worth noting that the shift to tablets (Apple or other) is a pretty significant step, partly evolutionary and partly revolutionary. Aside from touch and pen input, mobile operating systems provide much greater isolation between apps (with both pros and cons) and much better energy use/battery life. I am not ready to take this step yet myself: I'm a UX designer and still need a Mac to do my job. But it's definitely different. z

Link | Posted on Mar 19, 2020 at 14:44 UTC
In reply to:

Gesture: Let's re-invent the compact ILC.

I guess Moment beat us to it.

Link | Posted on Feb 7, 2020 at 04:04 UTC
On article Seagate is planning to release 18 and 20TB HDDs in 2020 (114 comments in total)

My first hard drive was 20MB. This should be (barely) sufficient for another couple of years.

Link | Posted on Jan 15, 2020 at 13:32 UTC as 2nd comment
In reply to:

starbase218: iPhone: 1 camera button.
Camera: camera buttons, dials, switches, etc.

Am I the only one who doesn’t get why phones supposedly threaten cameras?

Perhaps a more relevant metric than number of buttons would be number of photos taken per day, globally, by smartphones vs dedicated cameras.

Link | Posted on Nov 21, 2019 at 04:06 UTC

As a non-professional, I have found this scanner awesome. I have used it to scan about 1400 family pics (mainly prints but some old transparencies as well) starting in the 1920s, lots of Instamatic prints from the 70s, etc., resulting in a digital archive that is sharable online. Great results given the relatively low quality of the originals! I used an iMac, and the software is definitely a bit flaky but functions OK, per the review.

Link | Posted on Nov 1, 2019 at 13:20 UTC as 159th comment

Although $73.50 sounds cheap, the article notes that the camera is the single *biggest* item on the menu. One reason for this may be that it is not a solid-state device (with autofocus).

However, the iPhone's cameras would probably cost a lot more if they weren't part of the iPhone, which means they can be optimized for a far greater scale of manufacturing than traditional cameras. For example, the lenses are relatively low-tolerance items, but they are dynamically positioned by very special optical robots during assembly that optimize their optical alignment, resulting in more precise optics than could otherwise could be achieved with those same lenses.

Finally, the cameras can also be cheaper because much of the camera function really lies in the general-purpose computer and software at the heart of the iPhone. Computational photography makes those very cheap lenses and small sensors far more effective than they could be in a less computationally powerful dedicated camera.

Link | Posted on Oct 11, 2019 at 03:59 UTC as 22nd comment
In reply to:

(unknown member): "The RX100 VII is, in many respects, the best family camera ever made"
What a joke. How many families know how to expose correctly, want to waste time by editing raw photos or want to waste time due to Sony's crazy menu? The Rx100 cameras might be the most overrated cameras ever made.
A good smartphone camera would be a better choice for an average family.

I am a happy Sony NEX-5n user (and envious of later models' AF speed)... Despite its many other virtues I can't imagine why I'd buy the RX100 VII when low-light candids are such an important part of capturing family life

Link | Posted on Aug 27, 2019 at 20:48 UTC
Total: 122, showing: 1 – 20
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