Teila Day

Teila Day

Lives in United States FL, United States
Has a website at www.teiladay.com
Joined on Apr 5, 2005

Comments

Total: 1063, showing: 21 – 40
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In reply to:

AKH: I had big problems with both my 3Gs and my iPad. After many updates over 2-3 years they became completely useless. It could sometimes take 5-10 seconds to respond to a single keyboard input. After that I have never bought any Apple products.

... if an update doesn't benefit me.. I don't allow it on my system. I'm not compromising a quick running phone, iPad or computer.

Link | Posted on Dec 29, 2017 at 02:59 UTC
In reply to:

jerry7171: I’m barely an amateur so there are probably a lot of things I don’t know. I’ve been told by both a police officer and a city attorney that photography from sidewalks and streets are perfectly legal. Just so long as I’m not photographing inside private property. This is the rule of thumb I’ve worked under since. The only reason I asked was I was taking photos of a Richardsonian Romanesque house that had been neglected to near ruin. The owners confronted me and called the police. After the officers arrived they informed everyone I had the right to photograph anything from public streets and sidewalks. They could object but unless they put up visual barriers they had no choice. All that time I had been using a point and shoot camera with no zoom from the sidewalk. I visited the city attorney afterwards to confirm the law. She said the officers were right. Her advice was to return later if the owners were away.

Unfortunately many photographers aren't as respectful and mindful as you seem to be. Best in photography and the new year to you!

Link | Posted on Dec 28, 2017 at 19:01 UTC
In reply to:

Photato: There is nothing wrong about Apple doing smart power management when the battery useful lifetime has ended.
What is wrong is making iPhones with no user accessible batteries.

Laptops have had similar battery power management for years, yet this is not a controversial issue given that the user can simply replace the battery in seconds.

Replacing an iPhone battery involves sending the iPhone to a repair specialist shop with downtime of several days, even a week and who knows in what condition it is returned, like substandard weather seals, etc.

I wish Greenpeace could do protest stand-ups in those iPhone release events.
Replaceable batteries is the best way to deal with this problem and is best for the environment too. No more iPhone ending in landfills.

Photato, there's something very wrong with what Apple did. You don't slow someone down unless you ask them first, for all Apple knew, many people would've just rather dealt with a fast phone and live with whatever issues a worn battery might bring. Now if the user signed an agreement that covers this type of situation in Apple's favor then I side with Apple, however if the user did not then I hope Apple is required to cough up a lot of money as a punitive wake up call.

Link | Posted on Dec 28, 2017 at 18:58 UTC
In reply to:

jerry7171: I’m barely an amateur so there are probably a lot of things I don’t know. I’ve been told by both a police officer and a city attorney that photography from sidewalks and streets are perfectly legal. Just so long as I’m not photographing inside private property. This is the rule of thumb I’ve worked under since. The only reason I asked was I was taking photos of a Richardsonian Romanesque house that had been neglected to near ruin. The owners confronted me and called the police. After the officers arrived they informed everyone I had the right to photograph anything from public streets and sidewalks. They could object but unless they put up visual barriers they had no choice. All that time I had been using a point and shoot camera with no zoom from the sidewalk. I visited the city attorney afterwards to confirm the law. She said the officers were right. Her advice was to return later if the owners were away.

Jerry7171, keep in mind that photographing the side of someone's home will depend on state or municipal law(s). Try to photograph the side of a picturesque barn might be legal in one locale and illegal in another. I don't mind people shooting buildings from public areas (sidewalk, street, etc.) However, I think people should be swiftly arrested for trespassing in gated communities.

Link | Posted on Dec 27, 2017 at 21:47 UTC
In reply to:

Mykela: Turn it into a dog park. Trampling problem solved!

If it was a private gated community then the problem would truly be solved. People are starting to realize that if you want to maintain a nice, quiet neighborhood, you can do it better with high HOA fees, strict bylaws and strict state trespassing laws.

The only way to keep people out of your neighborhood is pretty much to buy into a gated community... one with an actual gate and security (that eagerly arrest people for trespassing), not the kind of community so-called "gated community" with a ultra low $125/mo HOA fee and no gate.

** Thankfully ** Florida, where I spend a lot of my time, has absolutely wonderful trespassing laws! ... making it easier to keep those not wanted in a respective area out of a particular area.

Link | Posted on Dec 27, 2017 at 21:29 UTC

Which is why I absolutely love gated communities! The number of photographers and tourist traipsing on lawns, parking in the street/on grass, sitting on private swings, and putting their models or brides on your private steps and making noise is proverb. Thankfully some areas here along the Gulf Coast have security that's actually effective and very, very quick to respond. The problem are people who do not respect (1) private property (2) have no concept of "keeping the integrity of a neighborhood".

I'm 100% firmly eye-to-eye with ultra strict HOA's / gated communities on this issue. What buyers need to realize are the legal compromises one makes when * not * buying into a private community (private streets, etc.).... you don't get the same protections. The stricter the better in my experience.

Link | Posted on Dec 27, 2017 at 18:56 UTC as 3rd comment
In reply to:

ewelch: This just shows how bad Google is at focusing on things. "Oh look, a photo suite we can snatch up for a few bazillion, and then we'll be the masters of photography! Oh wait, this is hard to do! Oh, well, we have lots more money where that came from. Someone dump this junk on some unsuspecting sucker."

(Not) Unsuspecting sucker: "Thanks Google for letting us make a great new product, since we know what we're doing, this will be a breeze!"

... I think it shows how bad people (not Google) are at understanding basic business.

Link | Posted on Dec 26, 2017 at 21:35 UTC
On article Sony a7R Mark III review (1234 comments in total)
In reply to:

Nick Brundle - Photography: Too many people spend too much time wondering what the camera is doing for you and not enough time pondering what their image is doing on the wall. Ultimately, it’s all about the image, not the equipment.

Miksto... you're making a lot of sense with realistic comments. The phrase "It's all about the photographer and not the equipment" is a peeve of mine. It's like saying, "it's all about the chef and not the ingredients." ... which of course is also ridiculous.

Best of the new year to everyone!

Link | Posted on Dec 26, 2017 at 21:31 UTC
In reply to:

virtualreality: US people are sickening. If you don't want a gun pointed at you, why don't you start by banning fire-arms?

Gun control doesn't control "bad" people. Bad people easily get RPGs so illegally obtaining a hand gun and bullets isn't inconceivable. You do not need to fire "hundreds of bullets" at a typical range, to use a gun properly / adequately purely for home protection. Many people make their own bullets... however those that do generally aren't the people in Oakland, New Orleans, or Chicago shooting into houses or cars or robbing people.

Making things grossly expensive typically greatly reduces problems.
e.g. If internet access cost $275 monthly, illegal downloads would plummet as would immature mud slinging back and forth on social media, etc..
Require the same kind of registration process a Japan does and that would curb gun violence as well. The object is to remove guns from the *most* problematic demographic when it comes to guns.

Link | Posted on Dec 23, 2017 at 14:00 UTC
In reply to:

Teila Day: "The body camera footage shows Grimm, who was shot in the chest and grazed in the shoulder, telling Shaw that he had both **flashed his car lights and waved** in order to alert the deputy to his presence."

He should sue. The officer should've been fired. That could've been some teenager taking photographs. The general public doesn't have to "alert" an officer that they are taking photographs, that's just part of being a cop; either you can manage the risk or you can't. If you can't, find another line of work. I'd like to see the cop put in prison.

Conversely, I'm 100% for cops shooting (or beating to a bloody pulp) people who throw rocks at cops, block traffic, resist arrest, lead cops on a high speed chase, drunk drivers, and common criminals recorded mid-crime (shoot those criminals dead where they stand!)

Holding cops to a higher standard isn't a one-way street. People get more time for shooting cops, then cops go to prison + more time for shooting the general public!

fatdeeman, For something to be classified as a "murder" it has to be unlawful. I'm only speaking of operating within the bounds of the law which is why I stated "legally" multiple times.

I can assure you "moral high ground" has nothing to do with my sentiment. I simply firmly believe in putting down violent criminals, criminals that steal property, and the like. I couldn't care less if you jaywalk, register your motorhome in Montana, or fail to pull a permit just to have $500 worth of upgrades done to your kitchen.

Link | Posted on Dec 22, 2017 at 09:16 UTC
In reply to:

virtualreality: US people are sickening. If you don't want a gun pointed at you, why don't you start by banning fire-arms?

@Karroly, I use sound reasoning; even if unpopular. I made an "if/and" statement. $25 for a bullet a-n-d stiff penalties. The fact of the matter is that when things *generally* cost more, we have less crime, less gross immaturity *affecting others*, and less negative social issues in contrast to lower pricing/easier availability. The maturity level is generally higher in a neighborhood with median home values of $800k compared to a trailer park. If bullets were $25 each, penalties were stiff to even own a gun, and a minimum credit score of 750 was required for gun ownership:

- there'd be less kids out shooting cans, squirrels and streetlights for fun
- homeowner's could still own a guns for protection with little additional monetary impact to finances.
- Adults in the poor areas of the U.S. would be less likely to shoot entire clips of bullets into the air on New Years eve, etc..

Obviously if bullets were "banned" homeowners and hunters couldn't legitimately use guns.

Link | Posted on Dec 22, 2017 at 07:44 UTC
In reply to:

jshen808: Police these days are way too trigger happy.. it's like shoot first, then ask questions later.. maybe the police needs to go back using a revolver, making less easy to pull the double action trigger.

Most police shootings are not because the officer realistically feared for his or her life. That's laughable. However, I agree with most of the criminals who got shot getting shot even though officers claiming that they feared for their lives is just ridiculous. 5 police officers with their guns drawn, will claim that they 'feared for their lives' when some petty criminal is waving a butcher knife around in an empty street. I might think the criminal deserves to die, but don't insult my intelligence with the whole officers feared for their lives lie.

Link | Posted on Dec 22, 2017 at 00:19 UTC
In reply to:

virtualreality: US people are sickening. If you don't want a gun pointed at you, why don't you start by banning fire-arms?

@virtualreality: "US people are sickening. If you don't want a gun pointed at you, why don't you start by banning fire-arms?"

That's like saying if you don't want to be raped, don't wear a short dress. Guns, like short dresses aren't the problem. If bullets costs $25 each and the penalty for a gun related criminal incident was mandatory 25 years in prison or death, then we'd have a lot less gun related crimes in the U.S.. Same goes for sexual assaults-- if the penalty for rape was death and the penalty for feeling someone up was having your arm cut off, you'd have a lot of people having a new respect for the word "no".

Link | Posted on Dec 22, 2017 at 00:13 UTC
In reply to:

brn: There are a lot of folk in this forum that want to believe cops like running around shooting people. You're wrong.

When an officer shoots someone, it is usually a career ending move. Not because they did something wrong, but because it goes against what they believe in. Believe it or not, most law enforcement officers chose the profession because they want to help people. Killing someone, even an evil someone, is extremely traumatic. Even if determined to be a clean shoot, the officer will typically resign within a year.

WGVanDyck: "That is the most stupid comment I have ever seen here."

If you think that's a 'stupid' comment, then that speaks volumes about what you don't know when it comes to realities involving careers, education and industry.

There was nothing "stupid" about my accurate comment. The truth is that people commonly pick careers based on their options or professional/personal needs as opposed to a love for the occupation. Fact: More people can quality for (and find it a LOT easier to get certified in) a teaching job than those who can successfully make it through an undergrad physics, engineering, finance, accounting or chemistry curriculum at a state school, let alone a great graduate program. The entire process to become a teacher is **generally considerably easier ** than getting through a 1st year of law school, passing the NCLEX, passing state accounting exams, statistic (actuarial) exams, or even getting a semi-decent score on the MCAT. Dispute that.

Link | Posted on Dec 21, 2017 at 23:34 UTC
In reply to:

brn: There are a lot of folk in this forum that want to believe cops like running around shooting people. You're wrong.

When an officer shoots someone, it is usually a career ending move. Not because they did something wrong, but because it goes against what they believe in. Believe it or not, most law enforcement officers chose the profession because they want to help people. Killing someone, even an evil someone, is extremely traumatic. Even if determined to be a clean shoot, the officer will typically resign within a year.

Jacques, I know a lot of teachers/professors/administrators, physicians, attorneys, vets, military officers, engineers, etc... many in any career did not choose their career simply for the love of it. So? To think otherwise is to be oblivious to career realities.

Speaking of homeschool... public school in the U.S. is institutionalized mediocrity run by a mediocracy comprised of second rate teachers and administrators. U.S. Public schools are fast-tracks to brain-waste.

About me: I have personal experience attending various public, private and an exclusive private school and both public/private universities. .. Assisted teachers at underserved schools in New Orleans and am familiar with public schools in the Bay area, Indiana and the Deep South. I also homeschool.

A child in my homeschool will CLEP or place in College Alg. and College Gen. Chemistry between 11 - 13yrs age. What's your public school track record in that area compared to most college prep focused homeschoolers?

Link | Posted on Dec 21, 2017 at 23:15 UTC
In reply to:

Teila Day: "The body camera footage shows Grimm, who was shot in the chest and grazed in the shoulder, telling Shaw that he had both **flashed his car lights and waved** in order to alert the deputy to his presence."

He should sue. The officer should've been fired. That could've been some teenager taking photographs. The general public doesn't have to "alert" an officer that they are taking photographs, that's just part of being a cop; either you can manage the risk or you can't. If you can't, find another line of work. I'd like to see the cop put in prison.

Conversely, I'm 100% for cops shooting (or beating to a bloody pulp) people who throw rocks at cops, block traffic, resist arrest, lead cops on a high speed chase, drunk drivers, and common criminals recorded mid-crime (shoot those criminals dead where they stand!)

Holding cops to a higher standard isn't a one-way street. People get more time for shooting cops, then cops go to prison + more time for shooting the general public!

@Photo_rb.. Kneeling during the anthem isn't a crime. I couldn't care less if you kneel, lay down, bark like a dog or howl at the moon during the anthem-- that's your personal business. I choose to respect the flag (though I don't support the pledge being recited in public schools- time should be better used), how much reverence you have for the flag is your personal business.

I'm not one of those hypocrite veterans that claim they fought for freedom and the rights for others to exercise their constitutional rights. I don't have a problem with people exercising their rights even if it doesn't square with how I exercise mine. I think the flag kneeling issue is silly, trite, and infantile for adults to get riled over.

Link | Posted on Dec 21, 2017 at 04:39 UTC
In reply to:

Photoman: Is it true that US Police have killed more US citizens, than died in 9/11? Is it too many guns in the US, that make the police so nervous?

No, it's poor training and our nation's blatant refusal to hold cops responsible for their actions. A police officer should know constitutional law better than a 1st year law student; officers hardly know the rights and laws they purport to uphold. The poor Constitutional Law knowledge by the typical police officer should be a gross embarrassment. Police officer should also be held accountable for lying and requiring people to produce I.D., etc., in clear cases when the law in fact, does not require such. Lying and not knowing the law should be an offense resulting in termination.

Link | Posted on Dec 21, 2017 at 03:54 UTC
In reply to:

brn: There are a lot of folk in this forum that want to believe cops like running around shooting people. You're wrong.

When an officer shoots someone, it is usually a career ending move. Not because they did something wrong, but because it goes against what they believe in. Believe it or not, most law enforcement officers chose the profession because they want to help people. Killing someone, even an evil someone, is extremely traumatic. Even if determined to be a clean shoot, the officer will typically resign within a year.

I think most cops choose the profession because it's a career with a low entry bar (I say that in a technical manner not as an insult), just like I believe most teachers are in the profession because it's one of the few careers that can be had without much education/professional training.

Link | Posted on Dec 21, 2017 at 03:49 UTC
In reply to:

Teila Day: "The body camera footage shows Grimm, who was shot in the chest and grazed in the shoulder, telling Shaw that he had both **flashed his car lights and waved** in order to alert the deputy to his presence."

He should sue. The officer should've been fired. That could've been some teenager taking photographs. The general public doesn't have to "alert" an officer that they are taking photographs, that's just part of being a cop; either you can manage the risk or you can't. If you can't, find another line of work. I'd like to see the cop put in prison.

Conversely, I'm 100% for cops shooting (or beating to a bloody pulp) people who throw rocks at cops, block traffic, resist arrest, lead cops on a high speed chase, drunk drivers, and common criminals recorded mid-crime (shoot those criminals dead where they stand!)

Holding cops to a higher standard isn't a one-way street. People get more time for shooting cops, then cops go to prison + more time for shooting the general public!

... and that's ok. Yes, I firmly believe that people should be legally able to run over those illegally blocking traffic without so much as a traffic inquiry. I will also affirm that I'm 100% for a cop or citizen being able to shoot a criminal dead at the scene of the crime as long as the crime can be verified. Someone stealing your car? You should be able to legally shoot them through the windshield. Someone stealing your TV, you should be able to legally shoot them in the back as they're running for the front door.

Disorder or not.. put me in charge of public assistance and crime and we'd have more people working and crime drastically reduced on day 1.

Link | Posted on Dec 20, 2017 at 22:03 UTC
In reply to:

labradoodler: Hardly surprised given the availability of Firearms etc .I would be nervous as a civilian never mind being an Officer.

If you're "nervous" then you're probably in the wrong neighborhood.

Link | Posted on Dec 20, 2017 at 21:17 UTC
Total: 1063, showing: 21 – 40
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