Teila Day

Teila Day

Lives in United States FL, United States
Has a website at www.teiladay.com
Joined on Apr 5, 2005

Comments

Total: 496, showing: 1 – 20
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On article Photokina 2016: Hands-on with Hasselblad X1D (111 comments in total)
In reply to:

K1000usr: I think Hasselblad got it right by putting in the leaf shutter, the only MF mirror-less game in town with that option.

I had handled the preproduction model -- a couple of months ago I think -- and the camera is very attractive. AF is slow. Rear screen could be higher in resolution. Lenses won't be so small, but the camera is very easily handheld. 1/2000 second flash sync is awesome.

Hasselblad price is a bit high of course, but I would also be curious where the Fuji would place its mirror-less camera.

I like the way Hasselblad/Phase think when it comes to leaf lenses, however much I love leaf shutters, I also like a focal shutter as well. Ideally, I think if Fuji/Pentax had a few leaf lenses that talked to the camera and activated the leaf shutter when appropriate like some older MF bodies, they'd really have a prized camera on their hands; satisfying landscapers, portrait and fashion shooters alike.

The Fuji and Pentax are just interesting! The most interesting things that I've seen in photography over the years.

Link | Posted on Sep 24, 2016 at 00:20 UTC
On article SanDisk 1TB SDXC card prototype unveiled at Photokina (94 comments in total)
In reply to:

acidic: I remember paying $250 for a 1GB CF card.

Oh wow! My 48meg card was a Viking card. Are they still around? 16g card on an industrial-like advert (PDF), is the last thing I've seen from them. Those cards sure did make my life a lot easier with no problems. Thanks for the memory!

Link | Posted on Sep 23, 2016 at 20:55 UTC
In reply to:

brn: Help me understand why this is such a big deal. My aging SB800 can have a flash duration as quick as 1/41,600.

Ah, I see now. What you primarily shoot is what speed lights are for. Weddings, close interiors, etc. = speed light territory. However, I think you're really misguided, you don't at all need newer technology to do that.

My old SB800's work just as well for *my needs* as a newer Premium flash from Nikon/Canon, and are backward compatible with all TTL Nikons film and digital. **Newer flashes generally are not. There's good reason professionals keep their SB800... because they are excellent quality and offer compatibility that newer speed lights do not. I can even use it on the new X1 Hasselblad.

There's also good reason other professionals primarily use strobes... (traveling is easy for me).

If you've used professional grade studio strobes then I'm sure you know why they are preferred. I'm sincerely glad speed lights are working out for you though! It will save you a lot of money :)

Link | Posted on Sep 23, 2016 at 15:20 UTC
In reply to:

Hans van Eijsden: 1/63.000? Let me guess.. at minimum power. What I would like to know is the combination of flash durations and power levels.

Eric, with only a 500ws strobe + modifier, many photographers are already facing a light deficit if they shoot south of f/10... So if you're shooting an action portrait of a gymnast on the uneven bars (facing you), use an ND filter to stamp out some ambient flooding the gym... where would that leave you on power?

Link | Posted on Sep 23, 2016 at 14:40 UTC
In reply to:

brn: Help me understand why this is such a big deal. My aging SB800 can have a flash duration as quick as 1/41,600.

DamianFL, thanks for mentioning the Nissin option, as it might save some photographers a lot of money. What studio strobes were you using? Do you not find handling a single strobe with battery easier? Having to deal with recharging batts or buying AA gets on my nerves. :) I used to use speed lights on the beach, but was relieved to switch to studio strobes many, many years ago.

Going from indoors to outdoors.. I can often unplug strobe, roll it and dolly outside and continue shooting w/attached battery. For *me* the studio strobes made things a LOT easier, and with better, faster lighting tech, especially in 1000+WS strobes, I'm eager to see what's over the horizon with built-in battery technology.

Link | Posted on Sep 23, 2016 at 06:23 UTC
In reply to:

brn: Help me understand why this is such a big deal. My aging SB800 can have a flash duration as quick as 1/41,600.

That's wonderful that you use them. Many working photographers use $200 studio strobes because that's all they need. If Nissin speed lights is all you need, and using bundled speed lights work for you then bravo!

You said: Technology moves forward, since you haven't use d speedlights in 8 years you're probably not to know" I think you need to work on your reading comprehension. I never said that I haven't used speed lights in 8 years. I use them regularly, hand metered, for accents, etc. with radio xnsmitters, especially in close confines or when shooting something that only requires a small light.

A brand new Nissin light doesn't give me anything more that I would use, over a 10 yr. old SB800. My old Metz MZ 76-5 puts out more light. I don't use/need TTL; If I need it, I already have it.

Again, bundling speed lights might be easier for you in your work, but when I'm shooting for pay like most others doing the same, we reach for studio strobes.

Best in photography to you!

Link | Posted on Sep 23, 2016 at 05:39 UTC
In reply to:

Sranang Boi: I have a feeling it will sell like hot cake. Specialist photographers have been dreaming of a camera like this.

@Brandless1, Did Hasselblad, Phase, and Pentax all get it wrong, or did they cater to people who not only don't mind the mirror, want to see through the lens, don't care to gaze at a glowing screen to focus, etc., you know.. those people who actually actually buy these cameras and lenses? A lot of us don't fancy the idea of having to rely on using a screen. I'd rather use a mirror, my eyes, and have lots of battery life in the process. :)

Link | Posted on Sep 23, 2016 at 04:26 UTC
On article Photokina 2016: Hands-on with Hasselblad X1D (111 comments in total)
In reply to:

Banhmi: I recognize the equivalency issue here with this being MF, but how come Hasselblad doesn't launch this camera with faster lenses -- like, say, at least F2.5 instead of F3.5?

Can't imagine spending all that money on a camera body when the lenses appear kinda 'meh'. From my perspective, this doesn't seem that much better than an a7Rii until better glass becomes available, but I suppose I'm missing something here?

Hi mosc, 1Dx yields less image quality and size than I get from a 645z. A Canon 5D2 or 5D3 simply isn't as good as the 645z, high iso or otherwise.

Unless I'm shooting a 5DS (less colour range (DR) than the 645z which is noticeable on foliage, etc..) I don't get the same cropping latitude that I enjoy using the "z", let alone a larger CMOS MF sensor. I've shot work at 16,000 ISO... please tell me how I would've done that using a 5DS.

Sony CMOS sensor whether it's attached to an old 503 series Hasselblad, Hasselblad H series or inside Pentax, it offers better overall performance over most FF cameras (resolution, IQ, high iso performance). Hard facts.

Fast FF lenses have their place. I use and love them! Fast FF lenses give shallower DOF but often that benefit is only academic because of what I *do* need in focus; advantage lost. The "z" gives me better raw performance over most FF today. Light fall off, gradations are often visibly better as well. :)

Link | Posted on Sep 22, 2016 at 22:44 UTC
In reply to:

mailman30: so what is a 63mm lens in 35mm terms with a sensor size of 43.8 × 32.9mm, as opposed to 24 x 36mm for 35mm?

Mick (chuckle) Ah, I see your meaning. 100% correct.

Link | Posted on Sep 22, 2016 at 20:32 UTC
In reply to:

brn: Help me understand why this is such a big deal. My aging SB800 can have a flash duration as quick as 1/41,600.

I'm not a sir (but I like your homage to Willy Wonka all the same). Technology old or new doesn't matter when it comes to the bottom line, and that is how much light is coming out of the thing. Yes, the SB800's are old and the "new stuff" doesn't offer any more benefit since I hand meter them for accent lighting when I'm using various cameras. I don't need the new electronics, I just need what the SB800 offers.

Don't you think if the "newer" speed lights offered a performance advantage, professional photographers would be using them as opposed to paying tens of thousands of dollars for lighting? Chew on that fat for a moment. You might want to look at pro studio lighting specs as well. Speedlights don't even come close.

Link | Posted on Sep 22, 2016 at 20:13 UTC
On article Photokina 2016: Hands-on with Hasselblad X1D (111 comments in total)
In reply to:

King of Song: Actually I'm becoming a little frustrated and confused. I'm disappointed with Canon. I don't really like the Nikon F mount. The Sony E mount is half gadget half camera. Sony A mount??? At heart I'm a medium format guy, in the past I always used Rollei 6008. Medium format digital has not really been feasible until now.

Last year I almost bought the Pentax 645Z, but I hesitated because I didn't really like the lenses. This new Hasselblad X1D is truly gorgeous, but the lenses are going to be slow. This means for street photography you will need to use higher ISO's which may negate the benefits of the larger format? If that's the case, why spend so much more, lose speed and versatility, and gain weight, if there is no mage quality dividends?

Suddenly there is another alternative, the new Fuji GFX 50S. It has the potential for faster lenses due to the fact that it has a shutter. I will wait for DPR to test these two cameras side by side, before I make my final decision.

King... I find the 645z easy to use in the street. Depending on your preference the lens offerings can be ideal or horrible. I actually find the Pentax range and price of lenses better than Hasselblad for my use. The 28-45 is a gem, 55 works nice, and the 120 and 300 get the job done without fuss. I wish they'd redo the 120, but you can buy a practically new (very lightly used) 120mm for less than $600 if you keep your eyes peeled... try that with the Hasselblad 120mm! ;)

When it comes to prints... you're not going to see a difference between the two. If you're used to shooting Rollei, you're not going to miss out on anything shooting at the higher isos, since (depending on the background) 12800 iso will look better than the results of using fast film much of the time.

Link | Posted on Sep 22, 2016 at 19:59 UTC
On article Photokina 2016: Hands-on with Hasselblad X1D (111 comments in total)
In reply to:

Banhmi: I recognize the equivalency issue here with this being MF, but how come Hasselblad doesn't launch this camera with faster lenses -- like, say, at least F2.5 instead of F3.5?

Can't imagine spending all that money on a camera body when the lenses appear kinda 'meh'. From my perspective, this doesn't seem that much better than an a7Rii until better glass becomes available, but I suppose I'm missing something here?

Why would you make a faster lens than 3.5 when relatively few are going to open the lens up beyond that anyway? (leaf shutters or not)

Sure, I wish my 645 28-45mm f/4.5 was a 2.8 zoom, and the 645 120mm macro was f/2.0, but at what expense? Would be benefit-to-increased price ratio make sense? I fancy fast lenses and use the stew out of faster apertures when shooting FF, however, the bottom line is that for most people who actually buy MF, faster lenses do not make more sense because of the little added performance benefit based on what most people shooting MF actually shoot and why they're shooting it. :)

Link | Posted on Sep 22, 2016 at 19:48 UTC
In reply to:

Carl Mucks: It's huge for its 0.8x crop factor. It looks ugly. And it's likely behind every professional FF camera in every measurement. What to be fascinated about? -- Ridiculous price?

Fuji must have caught a Zika virus, how else to explain this microcephalic camera?

Brendon 1000... There's too many nuances to mention that most books and online fora won't mention either. I shot work at 16,000 ISO on a 645z recently. Please tell me how to do that on a Canon 5DS? The obvious difference for me between the Canon and 645z is the lack of colour range in the Canon (or DR). The difference between the two is obvious in many situations, especially on foliage. I was eager to shoot (and possibly buy) 5DS (great camera), but real-world results didn't live up to what I wanted. MF gives a greater range of colour/smoother transition in the whites.

Link | Posted on Sep 22, 2016 at 08:37 UTC
On article SanDisk 1TB SDXC card prototype unveiled at Photokina (94 comments in total)
In reply to:

acidic: I remember paying $250 for a 1GB CF card.

Circa 1997 ... paid about $250 for a 48 Megabyte (you read correctly) card to use in a Nikon CoolPix 900s. ;) 8mb card came with the camera. This is back when home computers were topping out at about 32mb of ram.

Link | Posted on Sep 22, 2016 at 08:06 UTC
In reply to:

Nikonandmore: It's quite remarkable psychological fetish that most discussions about large format photography are invariably dominated by people that have NEVER shot a single photo with anything else than a consumer camera. But I am yet to see ONCE anyone that does professional & larger format photography jumping into discussions about consumer mainstream gear without actually knowing what they are saying or extensively having used it. Worse, professionals openly accept input & new ideas, & have interested in being educated about all matters of photography while others are just stuck in defending their gear against stuff they've never seen, used or tried.

Ignorance is painful & even more the lack of its awareness. And Im the first to admit my own in many areas & to insist on learning & listening more than I talk.

Ultimately all photography is about who takes the photo & what it's about, NOT about gear used. But using the better gear (because you understand & respect it) means you deserved it!

I'll ask a driver if you plan on driving the car hard. Ask the engineer if you plan on just weighing the car. The engineer won't know intimately about how a Ferrari *feels* when you yank it into a turn on a greasy road and where and when a significant amount of extra weight becomes an issue during the transfer of weight, when the car is going through a weight 'upset' and the car going from nice-to-awful-to-handle when the tail snaps around really hard. The reason why company *driver* feedback is paramount to engineering.

An engineer who isn't a pilot isn't going to be able to tell me that when an aircraft is loaded a certain way, at what slow airspeed the aircraft will *feel* too scary to fly. A pilot can relate that info. There's a difference between a plane being technically safe to fly, and too darn scary to fly safely under certain conditions.

Link | Posted on Sep 22, 2016 at 07:56 UTC
In reply to:

brn: Help me understand why this is such a big deal. My aging SB800 can have a flash duration as quick as 1/41,600.

DamianFL, I mentioned $4k because many speed lights are over $500 each, so if you use eight of those...

On a personal note, I haven't purchased speed lights in over a decade and won't purchase any more. I use the SB800's that we have on hand when I'm not using studio strobes. Speedlights just can't compare to studio strobes in the studio or on location when you need a lot of light with the camera stopped down at peak sync speed. No contest.

Link | Posted on Sep 22, 2016 at 07:29 UTC
In reply to:

Carl Mucks: It's huge for its 0.8x crop factor. It looks ugly. And it's likely behind every professional FF camera in every measurement. What to be fascinated about? -- Ridiculous price?

Fuji must have caught a Zika virus, how else to explain this microcephalic camera?

Yuk. Not a deal breaker for a lot of shooters that don't require, or can't make use of a faster sync. I do with focal shutters were standard, and every MF manufacturer offered at least 2 leaf shutter lenses that engaged only above 1/125. Thanks for the info.

Link | Posted on Sep 22, 2016 at 07:05 UTC
In reply to:

PanchoVilla: Look huge and ugly! This makes FF look like M43 sized cameras and lenses!

Remember that part on the SAT, ACT, LSAT, and other standardized exams that test reading comprehension?

(1) I didn't mention FF in relation to 35mm, because FF *is* 35mm. (shakes head)

(2) I specifically said that the phrase full frame should be dropped when referring to (here it comes) m-e-d-i-u-m f-o-r-m-a-t.

Link | Posted on Sep 22, 2016 at 07:00 UTC
In reply to:

UrrutiaPhoto: I would happily trade overall MP's for greater light and color sensitivity with a sensor this larger. I have enough full drives at the moment... It'd be interesting to see some more details about where the optimal resolution range is for this sensor size. Is it 50MP because that's the market, or because that's the best place for sharpness, sensitivity, etc. ?

ReDred Photo: You're covering a topic that unfortunately, manufacturers haven't awakened to yet. The fact that many people would snap up a 39mp CMOS sensor with larger light gathering capability and even wider colour range (DR). I've had to shoot some work at 16,000 ISO recently, and I would love to have a camera that could shoot that high and output a file that looks like a 1600 ISO shot.... so would many other photographers.

Link | Posted on Sep 22, 2016 at 06:55 UTC
In reply to:

Stephan Def: What are the file sizes? Would you shoot raw or jpeg with this? What kind of a computer would you need to process these file sizes in raw?

Is Fujifilm thinking of Film simulations for this, would this even make sense? I imagine you need quite a bit of horsepower to process these images in the Camera at shooting speeds. What kind of processors does it have?

This interesting stuff, I would like to know more details.

((chuckle)) I process 645z files *easily* on a 2015 Macbook. The truth of the matter is that any modern notebook can *easily* handle most processing work involving medium format. My old 2011 iMac (and older iMac before it) Handles raw medium format files just fine.

There was a time when computer power was an issue for post processing large files, but those days are practically gone. One can use a $500 laptop and a $125 portable drive and easily get by. If you want to bounce back and forth between Illustrator, InDesign, Photoshop and other programs while compositing and using 50 layers.... then that work is best done on a faster machine with a lot more ram... but just for processing portraits? A 2015 or later Macbook (let alone a Macbook Pro) is fine.

When I need more power, I use an iMac or even faster workstation, but for the simple stuff while sipping a green tea frap in Starbucks... a Macbook works like a charm! .. and drive space is too cheap to matter.

Link | Posted on Sep 22, 2016 at 06:47 UTC
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