keepreal

keepreal

Lives in United Kingdom Enfield, United Kingdom
Works as a Retired, was Information Technology Manager
Joined on Mar 24, 2007
About me:

Amateur with a passion for pictorial photography of more than fifty years. Likes to communicate and learn from others with expert knowledge, especially if they also live in the real world, have galleries or links to really good photos and put their camera to good use.

Comments

Total: 442, showing: 121 – 140
« First‹ Previous56789Next ›Last »
On article Yashica is teasing a comeback to the camera market (299 comments in total)

The Yashicamat was a nice 2-1/4" twin lens reflex, if you could not afford a Rollei. Otherwise, IMO nothing else they made was up to the competition.

Link | Posted on Sep 15, 2017 at 22:50 UTC as 55th comment | 2 replies

Lightweight, weighing in at just 1.12kg. LOL.

Compact, probably the size is anything but and as large as one can expect when they lie about the weight.

Link | Posted on Sep 15, 2017 at 22:44 UTC as 14th comment | 2 replies

What might improve the natural light shots is exposure bracketing, with a good HDR program to avoid ghosting. That should make it possible to get good exposure, contrast and saturation with good colour throughout after suitable adjustment of the controls in post processing.

I agree with others who suggest that insufficient effort seems to have been put into some of the natural light shots.

Furthermore, a reflector might be a third option in some cases, depending upon the light. Maybe with that the colour would also be improved because in some of the shots the gradation of the foreground is excellent, but that is little benefit when the colour is so dreadful as sometimes it is.

Link | Posted on Sep 15, 2017 at 22:31 UTC as 15th comment | 1 reply
In reply to:

AshMills: I wish my clients valued my work high enough to justify one.

If I cannot afford it, it must be good?

I wish I did not want what I cannot afford. It is pointless anyway without an electron microscope to examine the results and probably not even then.

Link | Posted on Sep 6, 2017 at 16:45 UTC

For once, a system with sensible maximum lens apertures.

That is not to say that larger apertures are pointless but, for most people no need for the extra bulk and weight But, of course, the cost but for this system is extremely costly anyway.

Link | Posted on Sep 6, 2017 at 16:40 UTC as 22nd comment
In reply to:

Arun H: To those saying 14 bit is always better than 12 bit, here is a counter example. Consider a sensor with a noise floor of 5e- and a top end of 100 ke-. The native DR of the sensor is 14.28. Since 100,000 takes 17 bits to store, suppose I simply clip the bottom 3 bits, i.e., count in steps of 8 during ADC. The effective dynamic range is 13.6 stops (log2(100000/8)). But a step of 8 is too coarse at the low end, and far too fine at the top end, where shot noise is > 300e-.

Now compare this to NEF, which in 12 bit uses a linear transform at the low end and quadratic at the high end. Here, every bit of information is stored at the low end where it matters, and larger quantization steps are used at the high end where shot noise makes small quantization wasteful. 12 bit NEF actually preserves the original DR of the sensor better than the 14 bit clipping scheme I described earlier!

Here's a guy that's done a comparison between 12 and 14 bit:

https://photographylife.com/14-bit-vs-12-bit-raw

I think the article Arun H mentions at https://photographylife.com/14-bit-vs-12-bit-raw holds the truth. Splitting hairs again. The difference between 12 and 14 bit is not discernible, as this articlepretty convincingly demonstrates.

Also, I cannot see what dynamic range has to do with 12 bit or 14 bit in spite of claims there is a correlation.

Link | Posted on Sep 5, 2017 at 14:51 UTC
In reply to:

odpisan: U shuld change the name of site!
DPreview should be changed in
Nikon-reviews
:o))))
________________
Shocking - 11 articels only about Nikon.
What's wrong with u guys?

Down below I said there were nine entries on the D850 yesterday and thought that ridiculous.

Increasingly, this is less a site primarily for grown men, but increasingly for overgrown boys with expensive toys. I exclude the fair sex only because usually they are more adult and sensible.

Link | Posted on Aug 25, 2017 at 17:34 UTC
In reply to:

keepreal: As of August 24, DPR has nine articles simultaneously on the Nikon D850, unless some are links on the home page to the same thing. But even if so, I am sure there still are too many. I cannot be bothered to check.

Whom the gods would destroy they first make mad. I imagine the DPR staff are so excited that few of them will get any sleep tonight.

@quietrich Not at all. It is just that the excellent articles are getting harder to find. There still are some. I have not found any alternative places. Please give me a list of them, but only ones that include the best and only that.

Link | Posted on Aug 25, 2017 at 07:15 UTC

As of August 24, DPR has nine articles simultaneously on the Nikon D850, unless some are links on the home page to the same thing. But even if so, I am sure there still are too many. I cannot be bothered to check.

Whom the gods would destroy they first make mad. I imagine the DPR staff are so excited that few of them will get any sleep tonight.

Link | Posted on Aug 24, 2017 at 22:08 UTC as 50th comment | 4 replies

The lessons are pretty straight-forward: always shoot Raw and use a program like FastRawViewer to assess your image files.

If you use the embedded JPEGs you are often going to be choosing the wrong frames to use. I have been amazed to find that the misinformation given by the latter can be enormous, causing you to select badly exposed images instead of the best ones.

Link | Posted on Aug 24, 2017 at 07:33 UTC as 15th comment | 1 reply
In reply to:

daddyo: The laws of physics have not changed over the course of the existence of photography.
I am not aware of any consideration of 'equivalence' prior to the advent of digital capture. Certainly the concepts were just as valid previously -- but no one that I am aware of cared, nor did photographers make purchasing/equipment choices based on equivalence factors.
Choices were made primarily on image quality needs, lens optical quality/speed/focal length, camera body features & size, and cost considerations.
No one that I know gave a flip about comparable total light, apertures, or DOF between different film format sizes.
The current debate over this issue does, however, provide for excellent forum filler and activity for those who love to debate technical issues -- regardless of practical relevance.

daddyo, I mostly agree. 126 words out of 127. Just one wrong one, excellent.

Link | Posted on Aug 23, 2017 at 17:56 UTC
In reply to:

keepreal: I think we are getting to the stage that we need dpenquirer.com as well as dpreview.com.

The journalists who cannot resist the temptation to publish such trash can then use the new site while people interested in truly informative articles and useful analysis, need only visit the one site, no more with such exasperation as is growing steadily at the moment.

If I offended you, Mr Butler, that was not my intention, but your comment suggests not.

No, your article is in no way questionable or untrustworthy, just pointless.

And quietrich, as you well know, my complaint is that the scroll on to the next post ratio is far to high and getting higher far too quickly.

Link | Posted on Aug 23, 2017 at 17:37 UTC

I think we are getting to the stage that we need dpenquirer.com as well as dpreview.com.

The journalists who cannot resist the temptation to publish such trash can then use the new site while people interested in truly informative articles and useful analysis, need only visit the one site, no more with such exasperation as is growing steadily at the moment.

Link | Posted on Aug 23, 2017 at 17:06 UTC as 59th comment | 6 replies
In reply to:

keepreal: No complaints at Mr Butler specifically. However, as someone said in comment on another thread, the signal to noise ratio at DP Review is increasing. Here we have anothjer excuse for more "column inches", nothing useful. Why do journalists have to present us with this stuff?

Is this concept the successor to the ridiculous (as most people thought) Dynamic Symmetry by Tavis Leaf Glover? Even if there is some analytical yardage for the laboratory in this - though heaven knows why it would ever get there - so what?

I warrant that being aware of the benefits of a larger sensor because the receptors are better spaced and gatter more light is worth knowing about if you wish to consider FX versus DX etc.

However, I am not going to waste my time on this. Even if I did it would achieve absolutely nothing. No benefits at all.

No. LOL.

Link | Posted on Aug 23, 2017 at 16:54 UTC

No complaints at Mr Butler specifically. However, as someone said in comment on another thread, the signal to noise ratio at DP Review is increasing. Here we have anothjer excuse for more "column inches", nothing useful. Why do journalists have to present us with this stuff?

Is this concept the successor to the ridiculous (as most people thought) Dynamic Symmetry by Tavis Leaf Glover? Even if there is some analytical yardage for the laboratory in this - though heaven knows why it would ever get there - so what?

I warrant that being aware of the benefits of a larger sensor because the receptors are better spaced and gatter more light is worth knowing about if you wish to consider FX versus DX etc.

However, I am not going to waste my time on this. Even if I did it would achieve absolutely nothing. No benefits at all.

Link | Posted on Aug 23, 2017 at 16:46 UTC as 66th comment | 5 replies
In reply to:

keepreal: The earth does not go around the sun as it does because it follows the laws of gravity. The earth goes around the sun as it does and we invented schema to describe it, to make it more intelligible to the human mind.

Likewise, there are no rules of composition or, if you wish to disagree with me, that's my rule. Not that I am denying that certain compositions work better than others, so guidelines rather than rules may be useful if one lacks an innate sense of what works and what does not.

Not wishing to be prejudiced, I did look briefly at the first video but only very briefly because three minutes was enough geometry for me. I am not saying that the approach is a waste of time, almost twenty six minutes to be exact, but nature has a habit of putting things into places beyond our choosing and before we take a photograph, we do not use a bulldozer or whatever else first.

So I will continue to manage without the geometry, choose my viewpoint intuitively, where I can, and afterwards...

"But - what all this has too do with HCB and composition, I have not the slightest idea."

Everything. There are no laws, except in the heads of people who invent them.

Link | Posted on Aug 20, 2017 at 06:06 UTC
In reply to:

keepreal: The earth does not go around the sun as it does because it follows the laws of gravity. The earth goes around the sun as it does and we invented schema to describe it, to make it more intelligible to the human mind.

Likewise, there are no rules of composition or, if you wish to disagree with me, that's my rule. Not that I am denying that certain compositions work better than others, so guidelines rather than rules may be useful if one lacks an innate sense of what works and what does not.

Not wishing to be prejudiced, I did look briefly at the first video but only very briefly because three minutes was enough geometry for me. I am not saying that the approach is a waste of time, almost twenty six minutes to be exact, but nature has a habit of putting things into places beyond our choosing and before we take a photograph, we do not use a bulldozer or whatever else first.

So I will continue to manage without the geometry, choose my viewpoint intuitively, where I can, and afterwards...

That was not my point. The earth going around the sun or, for example, hit a billiard ball violently so that many others move does not need laws to happen. We need laws to understand them, man made laws that fit what we observe and enable us to anticipate other, similar events.

Link | Posted on Aug 19, 2017 at 20:18 UTC

It is a well known fact that Henri Cartier-Bresson used an Albalda viewfinder on his Leica and had it modified. Normal ones just show lines to mark the rectangle for the field of view, maybe with additional indications to allow for parallax error close up. He also had a special camera body that took frames 24mm x 33.9mm (ratio 1:√2).

His viewfinder had the extra lines for dynamic symmetry and it was just about possible to see tiny bits of the actual subject through the spaces left in between.

Cartier-Bresson is often considered a genius in his street, oops I nearly said field, because he has such wonderful reflexes he could sense when to press the shutter release ahead of the event, so that by the time the short delay occurred before the exposure was taken, the subject had moved into the position he had anticipated. I doubt if even a 100m world class sprinter has reflexes to match that.

Link | Posted on Aug 19, 2017 at 17:15 UTC as 118th comment | 1 reply

Another thought is that there are no straight lines in nature, so the grid should have been made up with curves. They could not be circular, either, because that is a special case of an ellipse or whatever, so therefore unnaturally regular.

I often notice how beautiful the asymmetrical balance of a tree and its branches can be. Really! Which laws of composition do they follow, Mr Tavis Leaf Glover?

Link | Posted on Aug 19, 2017 at 17:01 UTC as 121st comment | 3 replies
In reply to:

mostlylost: This article is nothing more than a marketing vehicle for the author.

In this world there are a few geniuses, people who understand or create what is beyond us. We then may learn something new and profound, interesting or useful. In that regard, most of us are, through lack of choice, sheep and there is nothing wrong in that where there is no alternative.

And then we have these guys trying to make a reputation or a buck, having nothing to say but willing to make fools of themselves by saying it anyway. Trouble is there is an awful lot of them. And an awful lot of fols who take them seriously and do not reckon the king's new clothes.

Link | Posted on Aug 19, 2017 at 16:49 UTC
Total: 442, showing: 121 – 140
« First‹ Previous56789Next ›Last »