caterpillar

Lives in Philippines Quezon City, Philippines
Joined on Sep 16, 2002
About me:

Equipment: Sony a7 iii, Sony a5100, a5100, Lumix gx7, 20D. Panasonic fz-1000
Lenses -
for Sony: Tamron 28-75 f2.8 RXD, Sony FE 28 f2.0, Sony FE 24-240.

Sony 16-50 f3.5-5.6 OSS, 55-210 f4.6.3 OSS, 18-105 f4 PZ OSS, 50 f1.8 OSS.

For Panasonic: Lumix 12-35 f2.8 I, 12-60 f3.5-60 OIS, Oly 45 f1.8, PL 15mm f1.7, PL 24 f1.4, Olympus 14-150, 45-150.

For Canon: ef 85 f1.8 usm, ef-s 10-22 f3.5-4.5, ef 70-200 f2.8L IS, efs 18-135 STM, 50mm f1.8 STM, he Tamron 17-35 f2.8-4.0 Di.
Plan to get an a6400, sony 70-350 OSS.

Love sports/action, portraits, candid, street, photography. Love doing weddings and happy events.

Comments

Total: 309, showing: 61 – 80
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On article Nikon Z7 Review (4473 comments in total)
In reply to:

Kurgo: 1 card slot and horrid battery life. Goddamn you Nikon, the a7III and a7RIII are out already, you only needed to put a better battery in and another card slot to be perfect but no, of course not.

@vFunct - People have got to stop using PJs and sportshooters as the role model of credibility.

1 - I doubt if ther's 1M PJ/SS in the world
2 - Most PJ/SS don't own or buy their own gear
3 - The body is U$6k (u need 2 at least), lenses in the U$10k-12k for d long range. The regular PJ/SS can't afford U$30-50k for equipment.
4 - OEMs build only about 5-8k flagship bodies/yr.
5 - U$2k cameras usually are in the 100k/yr. Sony can make 240-480k A7-3's a year.
6 - There are more wedding/events pros all over the world numbering maybe in the 20-100M easy. And they usually pay for their own gear, willing to upgrade within 3 years avg and have no qualms in shifting if it makes their jobs easier. The pro events shooter can take a 50% loss in selling Canikon gear, and make up for the balance in 3-7 weddings. They usually do 30-50 a year.

The best pro to gauge acceptance are the wedding/events pros. The A7-3 is out of stock even after 9-10 months because of them. Panny knows this too!

Link | Posted on Oct 17, 2018 at 01:32 UTC
On article Nikon Z7 Review (4473 comments in total)
In reply to:

Ergo607: I know I am going to get slammed for this: but much ado about nothing.

Given the anticipation with the teasers, this is nothing short of a deception. 2 bodies and 3 lenses (and an adapter.) Guess you have to start somewhere, but in 2018, if you are only half serious about photography, a one card slot is no go. Specs wise it is also a let down. A Panasonic GH5 will crush this thing in video at half the price No large aperture lenses on launch (the least I expected was a 1.4 or 1.2 premium lens - you have to wait until 2020 for that.) And have you seen the prices? What are they made of? Gold? The only more or less exciting thing will be the noct, but then again: manual focus (and I dare not imagine the price of this.)

Guess Sony doesn't have to worry too much...

@Double D - I agree. Legacy glass are only temporary and transition lenses. In the long run, people will have to abandon them (99% of them) for the MILC version. It's not just about performance especially with wide angle lenses (which are really amazing), but also because people will need the latest AF tech (silent and way faster), better materials, etc. Most important is, lenses are used to "lock in" or barriers to exit for shooters. You are more reluctant to shift due to your glass collection.

The problem is - you old glass will fall by the wayside in 3-7 years anyway even if you stay with the same brand! And even if you are decided to replace them, Canikon will still have to build those lenses you may want! Sony and others already have them. And since they also have not opened their standards, 3rd party lens makers won't be a refuge for those FL or Zooms the OEM has.

The reality is - Canikon would just love for you to change lenses to them as lenses are money making too.

Link | Posted on Oct 17, 2018 at 01:21 UTC
In reply to:

mr.izo: "No. Actually, I personally had no idea about the new camera. So at the press conference [at Photokina] I saw the camera for the first time. We do not exchange information [between Sigma, Panasonic and Leica] about our roadmap for products for the new system. It’s a matter of compliance [with antitrust legislation]. We simply cannot do that"

lol.

@AndroC - that may be true in Japan. But in a global market, you can get sued in the USA or elsewhere. You don't want that hassle.

Besides, Sigma's main line of business and forte are lenses. All they need to do is stick with it and see which one has more promise. Judging by the many releases, you know that the E-mount is the present and future with the way their are ramping up for it. It's not as if they have advanced knowledge of what will be released as far as Sony goes. Their tea leaves in the cup is the simple market/sales report. And trust me, they have accurate readings of those. That is their bread and butter indicator. And that is 80% of the indicator they need to know which they should bet their money in. So, whatever Mr. Yamaki bets on or is doing, that is 90% of what the market is doing and/or going. They don't have the luxary to get lens forecasts wrong.

Link | Posted on Oct 16, 2018 at 00:32 UTC
In reply to:

Photato: I can't wait to finally leave Canon and move to the killer L mount.
Can't go wrong with Panasonic ingenuity, Leica superb quality, Sigma's excellent value with native lens support and Foveon.

@robblackett - Though it is too early to say if Panny's offering will be a "killer," waiting 6-8 more months are valuable R&D time and market feedback that will help avoid what Canikon has done with their releases.

Also, it is clear that Panasonic is using some of Sony's playbook - target the wedding/events shooters, and you will elicit more switchers. Don't go for the PJ/sport shooters as many always use to prove superiority. Target the millions of wedding shooters as those are the ones who are more willing to change if only to make their jobs easier. If they do a good job, they can steal more canikon shooters than Sony fans. That too early release of the Z and R basically says, they just want to stop the bleeding, not make other brand users switch.

Link | Posted on Oct 16, 2018 at 00:27 UTC
In reply to:

(unknown member): "They’re possible due to the wide diameter and short flange back. "

Apparently ever lens manufacturer other than Sony sees the benefit of the wide diameter and short flange back; Canon, Nikon, and now Sigma has stated this. There is an actual video tape of Sony claiming otherwise. I have nothing against Sony, but the laws of physics apply equally to all lens designers.

@Arun H - that is true, physics is physics, until such time that software plays a bigger role in things.

However, the other reality is - very few will need a f0.95 lens. Physics may help in designing and building such a lens, but it also makes other parameters a challenge. Even fewer can afford their high tag. For most, f1.4 is as good as it goes without slowing down AF due to the heavy glass and keeping size, weight and cost affordable. In fact, for most f1.8 is just fine.

Years ago, Canon built a 50mm f1.0 after they shifted from FD to EF mount. This was done to mock Nikon on their inability to make an f1.0 lens because of the small throat diameter. Canon did not follow up that lens as it was still hard to build and it was basically soft unless one stops down to around f2.8 or so. It was just built basically to spite Nikon. Even the 50mm f1.2 has it's own issues. The market basically will be fine w/ f1.4.

https://c1.staticflickr.com/8/7004/6451581991_f0c43fed4f.jpg

Link | Posted on Oct 16, 2018 at 00:17 UTC

It is always a pleasure to read Yamaki San's interview. They are very simple but straight to the point, hardly any ambiguity or attempt for secrecy or to misdirect. In fact, he is one of the few CEO's one can use to gauge how the market will go. Though they don't make cameras for the mainstream, how Mr. Yamaki sees the market and the future basically is 90% of how it will be. He can't afford to BS because their sole business is lenses. To call it wrong is disastrous for them! But you also have to learn to read his statements between the lines! Because he is polite and a gentleman wanting to avoid antagonizing some brands, he will not directly say bad things about them. But you still have to read what he fails to say or off-tangently say.

Those who want to know how the future will unfold, use Yamaki san's POV/opinion. They are pretty accurate. Use that as a free advice as to how the next 2-5 years will unfold.

Link | Posted on Oct 16, 2018 at 00:05 UTC as 27th comment
In reply to:

caterpillar: People use the expression, "elephant in the room." But what if instead you don't find the animal you expect in the room? That is what I have to ask myself as Olympus seems to be left out of the party.

So, what will Olympus do now? Ignore this alliance and continue what they were doing? Is this even sustainable? Would doing nothing be tantamount to suicide?

Or, can they join in this alliance (if the 3 let's them)? But I think the big question for Olympus is - will they have the resources, patience, and endurance to go for a 35FF camera in conjunction with MFT? This is a substancial commitment and big bucks are involved that will be let out the next 1.5-2 decades.

@Dr_Jon -

"P.P.S. I'd be quite surprised if each M50 doesn't make Canon more money than either the GH5 or A6500 makes Panasonic/Sony as they have so many more sales to spread development and marketing costs over."

Then why is their profits down?

That FS just shows you that unit sales does not necessarily mean higher profits.

"

Link | Posted on Oct 15, 2018 at 16:31 UTC
In reply to:

caterpillar: People use the expression, "elephant in the room." But what if instead you don't find the animal you expect in the room? That is what I have to ask myself as Olympus seems to be left out of the party.

So, what will Olympus do now? Ignore this alliance and continue what they were doing? Is this even sustainable? Would doing nothing be tantamount to suicide?

Or, can they join in this alliance (if the 3 let's them)? But I think the big question for Olympus is - will they have the resources, patience, and endurance to go for a 35FF camera in conjunction with MFT? This is a substancial commitment and big bucks are involved that will be let out the next 1.5-2 decades.

@Dr_Jon -
"P.S. remember the maximum profit from a product isn't gained by the highest selling price, as volumes fall rapidly as price rises. There is a sweet spot where you make the most money."

Then explain to me why Canon's bottom line is down and way lower than Sony for the same price segment!? Anyone who knows pricing and segmentation knows that the low end may have large volumes, but profits per unit also low. At the high end, you make up for the low volume by higher prices.

But we are not talking of the 1Dx2 here or the A9 that goes U$4k-6.5k. We are talking of the sweet spot in pricing which is the midrange. That's around U$1,200-U$2,000. Your margins there about 40% on avg. That is why Panny made a killing with the Gh5 considering the A7-3 also sold for the same price! But now, Sony also has the volume! That is why Sony is making a killing with the RX100 and RX10 and Canon has nothing to match up to these. Their 1" is just playing sub U$1,000.

Link | Posted on Oct 15, 2018 at 16:29 UTC
In reply to:

caterpillar: People use the expression, "elephant in the room." But what if instead you don't find the animal you expect in the room? That is what I have to ask myself as Olympus seems to be left out of the party.

So, what will Olympus do now? Ignore this alliance and continue what they were doing? Is this even sustainable? Would doing nothing be tantamount to suicide?

Or, can they join in this alliance (if the 3 let's them)? But I think the big question for Olympus is - will they have the resources, patience, and endurance to go for a 35FF camera in conjunction with MFT? This is a substancial commitment and big bucks are involved that will be let out the next 1.5-2 decades.

@Dr_Jon - And it's as if Sony is not covering all price points too! They are! It's even more embarrassing that Sony doesn't even bother to make a new model & front up the a5100 and a600 to cover the low end - both 5 year old models!

If they are covering all price points, where is Canon's U$1,100-1,500 models? Their GX7-2 has to be sold at U$649, while RX100-6 sells at U$1,100! What is Canon's response to the RX10-4 at U$1,700? Is that what you call "making cameras for all possible customers, so at all price points?" If they don't have a U$1,100-1,700 to cover or have a camera that matches it, then, they are not delivering the goods for the customer nor are they covering all price points.

They don't even have an A7-2 that sells for U$1,200!

Link | Posted on Oct 15, 2018 at 16:09 UTC
In reply to:

caterpillar: People use the expression, "elephant in the room." But what if instead you don't find the animal you expect in the room? That is what I have to ask myself as Olympus seems to be left out of the party.

So, what will Olympus do now? Ignore this alliance and continue what they were doing? Is this even sustainable? Would doing nothing be tantamount to suicide?

Or, can they join in this alliance (if the 3 let's them)? But I think the big question for Olympus is - will they have the resources, patience, and endurance to go for a 35FF camera in conjunction with MFT? This is a substancial commitment and big bucks are involved that will be let out the next 1.5-2 decades.

@Dr_Jon - you again conveniently left out that their profits are down. It may be highest in a decade, but it is still down. Sony can claim the same, but their profits are way up. And even beats what Canon has. It is you and Canon that doesn't. Firms look at the BOTTOM LINE, not unit sales. Again - sell 1M units but get only U$500k profits or sell only 500 units but earn U$2M profits? Which his better? Also, remember, their profits are still down vs last year in this segment! Don't include the other cost centers in your calculations!

Link | Posted on Oct 15, 2018 at 16:06 UTC
In reply to:

caterpillar: People use the expression, "elephant in the room." But what if instead you don't find the animal you expect in the room? That is what I have to ask myself as Olympus seems to be left out of the party.

So, what will Olympus do now? Ignore this alliance and continue what they were doing? Is this even sustainable? Would doing nothing be tantamount to suicide?

Or, can they join in this alliance (if the 3 let's them)? But I think the big question for Olympus is - will they have the resources, patience, and endurance to go for a 35FF camera in conjunction with MFT? This is a substancial commitment and big bucks are involved that will be let out the next 1.5-2 decades.

@Dr-Jon - Go to the Canon web site. Look at their FS. Your 5.5M ILCs is still reflecting a lower result where it matters - profits. Go take a look. Even if you aggregate all ILC's, they are way lower compared to last year. Is that something to shout out from the rooftops to investors?

They have managed to tame the yieds in sensor size since about 5-7 years ago. I don't believe it's that bad anymore. The fact that you can sell an aps-c dslr like the d3400 for around U$500 shows it is not a big problem anymore. When a 35FF camera is only U$1,600 or even U$1,100, you know that sensor cost isn't as big a factor anymore, unless you are saying that Canon is losing money by selling U$450-550 cameras!

Panasonic is making a killing by selling the GH5 at U$1,600 since sensor size. It's a MFT sensor. Why can't Canon sell an M for that same amount and improve their profit? It's because the M5/M50's features/performance can't match up. That is also why Sony can command U$1,100 for the a6500.

Link | Posted on Oct 15, 2018 at 00:39 UTC
In reply to:

caterpillar: People use the expression, "elephant in the room." But what if instead you don't find the animal you expect in the room? That is what I have to ask myself as Olympus seems to be left out of the party.

So, what will Olympus do now? Ignore this alliance and continue what they were doing? Is this even sustainable? Would doing nothing be tantamount to suicide?

Or, can they join in this alliance (if the 3 let's them)? But I think the big question for Olympus is - will they have the resources, patience, and endurance to go for a 35FF camera in conjunction with MFT? This is a substancial commitment and big bucks are involved that will be let out the next 1.5-2 decades.

@Dr_jon - the higher cost segment will always be smaller. It has nothing to do with the sensor size. The GH5 at U$2,000 will have fewer units sold. But darn, it makes lots more of money! By your own reasoning that if aps-c sized MILCs can be made cheaper, then surely Panasonic is making a killing with the G9, GH5, Gh5s, even the G85!

The M50 is U$779 body only. The GH5 is U$1,698. The Sony a6500 about U$1,100. So, who is making more profit? Why can't Canon sell an M for U$1,000 or higher to make more profit? Because it can't, then with everything being equal, Panasonic and Sony are earning more profits per unit sold. Canon has to sell more units to get the same profits.

Remember too that the market is being squeezed from both the bottom and top. And in 3 years, the basic 35FF MILC will be in the U$1,500-1,700 range. And U$500 MILC will be there only as a place marker. To earn decently, the bottom line is U$800-1,000.

Right now, Sony can sell the A7-2 for only U$1,100.

Link | Posted on Oct 12, 2018 at 00:52 UTC
In reply to:

caterpillar: People use the expression, "elephant in the room." But what if instead you don't find the animal you expect in the room? That is what I have to ask myself as Olympus seems to be left out of the party.

So, what will Olympus do now? Ignore this alliance and continue what they were doing? Is this even sustainable? Would doing nothing be tantamount to suicide?

Or, can they join in this alliance (if the 3 let's them)? But I think the big question for Olympus is - will they have the resources, patience, and endurance to go for a 35FF camera in conjunction with MFT? This is a substancial commitment and big bucks are involved that will be let out the next 1.5-2 decades.

@Dr_Jon - I am not preaching that FF is the future. If that is true, then Fuji has no future because they don't have one. And Pentax will have a future because they have one. It is not about the sensor size alone that makes Sony competitive.

Not guessing numbers. These Canon and Sony FS is there for all to see. Lots of M sales, but low profits for Canon. Always sold out for A7-3.

Again, if it is cheaper to make aps-c, remember that Sony & Fuji make them too and they are selling in the higher tiers which makes more profit. How can the M50 or M5 stack up with the A6300 or a6500 or the XT-3? It can't.

Link | Posted on Oct 12, 2018 at 00:42 UTC
In reply to:

(unknown member): This would be a heck of a lot more meaningful if it was more about what people *actually* do rather than what they *plan* to do. Aspirations are one thing, but they aren't usually followed through on.

@anticipation_of - well said. They should have also asked if they plan to buy one in the next 6 or 12 months. And ask what budget or price range they are willing to spend.

Years ago, in the 1980's I think, a well known consumer product maker (not Sony) made a market study on a boom-box type of radio/casette they intended to release. They asked all sort of questions (do they like the size, form, the color choices, the sound, the features, the price, etc). They also made sure the sampling was correct. When they finally built and sold it, it failed!

Why did it fail? It's because they never asked if they would buy it. They just assumed that since all answers were positive, hence it will sell.

I may like and be impressed with the MS Slate, but I does not mean I will buy it. If they asked, the reason(s) for not buying would be revealed. They could proceeded to fix those.

So, this survey may or may not be an indicator of future sales. If any the past 5 years the market hardly grew.

Link | Posted on Oct 8, 2018 at 02:04 UTC
On article DPReview TV: Canon EOS R review (719 comments in total)
In reply to:

T3: Canon's last two FF camera releases: 6D MKII and EOS R. Both appear to be lackluster, underwhelming introductions that are a bit outdated even at the time of their release. I wonder what Canon's update cycle on the EOS R will be. Hopefully not another 5 years, like their DSLRs.

@T3 - If they do a 3-5 year cycle for this, then what I suspect will come true. Canon will exit the camera market. Of course, the brand will live on, but another company will own it, like what Polaroid is now, or Nokia, Motorola, etc.

I expect a mark 2 will be released in 1 year. No more than 1.5 years. Problem with that ver is that it will just correct the mistakes with ver 1, like putting the ON/OFF button where it should be, removing the slider, and maybe they can get the eye-focus to work properly. If Canon fans are lucky, they may even get IBIS, though I doubt if it will be as good.

Meanwhile, it's not as if Sony, et al, will be doing nothing to let Canikon to catch up. By the time, Canikon makes an A7-3 equivalent, Sony will likely be doing global shutter even on aps-c mode. Let's also not forget that by that time, entry level A7-4, may go down in price as well. There will be a time where the A7-3 and other 35FF MILC will be sold at U$1,700.

Link | Posted on Oct 6, 2018 at 23:15 UTC
On article DPReview TV: Canon EOS R review (719 comments in total)
In reply to:

kristof93: This doesn't seem to have almost any advantage over the Sony (and even the Nikon) lineup.

@kristof93 - that is and was fairly obvious even before this review. The things mentioned like EVF, adapters, ergonomics, etc are not really deal breakers for many. And for what it cannot do or do well, those are the deal breakers. For example, having eye-focus is useless if it is only in AF-S and it cannot stick to the subject if they turn their heads. 3-5fps in AF-C. No IBIS. No dual card slots, etc. These things make or break a wedding/events shooters. A camera that can meet a lot of demands from wedding shooters is the better camera overall because weddings/events are very demanding. If you hit those specs/performance, then all other types of photography fall by the way side, except extreme sports/action and landscape. And at U$2,300, the camera is underwhelming.

It is obvious this camera is not out to beat or compete with the A7-3. It is out only as a stop gap and to stem the bleeding.

Link | Posted on Oct 6, 2018 at 23:02 UTC
On article DPReview TV: Canon EOS R review (719 comments in total)
In reply to:

StillandMovingImages: Thank you for the very forthright video review of the EOS R. Thus far, the reviews of the EOS R that I have read and seen are very disappointing. The reviews, thus far, of the Z7 do not appear to be markedly better. I hope that Panasonic learns from Canon and Nikon's mistakes and offers something comparable to Sony.

@StillandMovingImages - Panasonic should be better. Here's why:

- Instead of rushing to the market, they took the time to do the R&D. Not saying it will be an A7-3 killer (though, if it is, this will be good), but it should not have the weaknesses of the R and Z cameras.

- Panasonic is targeting the wedding/events shooters. If that is your target market, the specs and performance will have to step up.

- Panasonic wants you to switch. They are not out to simply keep their base.

Panny has to offer more or close to what the A7-3 can if they want to achieve these goals. The benchmark has always been the A7-3. Panasonic can also offer
better video which Sony may not offer this round.
- They are

Link | Posted on Oct 6, 2018 at 22:49 UTC
On article DPReview TV: Canon EOS R review (719 comments in total)
In reply to:

misspiggy01: for video 1 slot is fine.

i mean who shoots video to 2 cards? anyone? that´d be crazy! you´d fill so much space so fast!

@misspiggy01 - it is obvious you don't do that much video or critical work video. Here are some reasons:

- You shoot a once-in-a-lifetime event (like a wedding), if one card fails, you are dead with no backup.

- 4k needs a lot of processing to edit. The 2nd card slot can save proxy files like 720p instead of 4k. You edit using the proxy, and it is easier. You only use the 4k footage on final render.

Storage is not that expensive anymore, so cost is not an issue. At U$2,300 you expect to have a 2nd card slot. It is shameful not to have one.

Overall, it is obvious that the R is not ready for serious and critical work. Best to wait for the mark 2. The A7-3 can already do a lot for U$300 less.

Link | Posted on Oct 6, 2018 at 22:39 UTC
In reply to:

caterpillar: People use the expression, "elephant in the room." But what if instead you don't find the animal you expect in the room? That is what I have to ask myself as Olympus seems to be left out of the party.

So, what will Olympus do now? Ignore this alliance and continue what they were doing? Is this even sustainable? Would doing nothing be tantamount to suicide?

Or, can they join in this alliance (if the 3 let's them)? But I think the big question for Olympus is - will they have the resources, patience, and endurance to go for a 35FF camera in conjunction with MFT? This is a substancial commitment and big bucks are involved that will be let out the next 1.5-2 decades.

@Dr_jon - Canon is selling a lot of M cameras. The m50 is a hit! But look at their FS, the revenues and profits are down vs last year same quarter earnings. That's a lot of cameras sold, but overall the profits are still down. Now go to the Sony FS site. The profits are up for the same period! Don't tell me the 5 year old a5100 and a6000 is the cause of it!

It's simple - the big profits is in selling the 35FF MILCs. The A7R's and A7's are making a killing!

If you still are an unbeliever, why does Canikon, then Pentax, then Sigma, and maybe Olympus later, have to build a 35FF MILC? If one is doing well financially, a firm need not do anything. All they have to do is NOTHING. But the fact that they are all changing course means their position is no longer tenable or sound. IF they don't do anything and rely on their 1-M units sold, they will see the profits going down, and down, and down.

Link | Posted on Sep 29, 2018 at 00:06 UTC
In reply to:

caterpillar: People use the expression, "elephant in the room." But what if instead you don't find the animal you expect in the room? That is what I have to ask myself as Olympus seems to be left out of the party.

So, what will Olympus do now? Ignore this alliance and continue what they were doing? Is this even sustainable? Would doing nothing be tantamount to suicide?

Or, can they join in this alliance (if the 3 let's them)? But I think the big question for Olympus is - will they have the resources, patience, and endurance to go for a 35FF camera in conjunction with MFT? This is a substancial commitment and big bucks are involved that will be let out the next 1.5-2 decades.

@Dr_jon - Sony is capable of 30,000-40,000 units per month. In the early days of DSLRs, companies even produce 80,000-100,000 aps-c dslrs/month! It even peaked to around 130k/month! This was around 2005-2007! So, in terms of production, everybody can make them in quantities. The only limit I see is the sensor supply or the initial cost and risk if they don't sell. You don't really want to order 60,000 sensors only to find out that the camera is selling slow. As far as Sony goes, I think they can even go for 50,000 a month if their sensor and processor supply is readily available. MILCs are also way easier/less complicated assemble. So, it should be turning out and we should see around 400-500k A7-3 sold in its 1st year.

The d850, in spite of high demand is out-of-stock because they don't have the sensor to make them. Most likely the contract is for 100k-150k sensors only and Sony will not sell them any more.

Link | Posted on Sep 29, 2018 at 00:00 UTC
Total: 309, showing: 61 – 80
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