caterpillar

Lives in Philippines Quezon City, Philippines
Joined on Sep 16, 2002
About me:

Equipment: Sony a7 iii, Sony a5100, a5100, Lumix gx7, 20D. Panasonic fz-1000
Lenses -
for Sony: Tamron 28-75 f2.8 RXD, Sony FE 28 f2.0, Sony FE 24-240.

Sony 16-50 f3.5-5.6 OSS, 55-210 f4.6.3 OSS, 18-105 f4 PZ OSS, 50 f1.8 OSS.

For Panasonic: Lumix 12-35 f2.8 I, 12-60 f3.5-60 OIS, Oly 45 f1.8, PL 15mm f1.7, PL 24 f1.4, Olympus 14-150, 45-150.

For Canon: ef 85 f1.8 usm, ef-s 10-22 f3.5-4.5, ef 70-200 f2.8L IS, efs 18-135 STM, 50mm f1.8 STM, he Tamron 17-35 f2.8-4.0 Di.
Plan to get an a6400, sony 70-350 OSS.

Love sports/action, portraits, candid, street, photography. Love doing weddings and happy events.

Comments

Total: 309, showing: 21 – 40
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On article DPReview TV: Panasonic G95 first impressions review (72 comments in total)

If you already have the g85, better skip this release. If you are coming from a gx85 or a g7, this is a good upgrade.

If you are with other systems, the xt-30 and a6400 or even the older a6300/a6500 are tough competitors and may not sway you to this, especially if AF-C is a big concern and you already have lenses invested.

It is a good model though I find the price a bit too high. If it eventually settles down to U$800-850, it should be competitive.

Link | Posted on Apr 6, 2019 at 00:25 UTC as 18th comment | 3 replies
In reply to:

KrisAK: I get the sense that 'photography' is merely a way for Sony to profitably leverage its tech. This is in stark contrasts to what I've read in interviews with Sigma, Fuji, etc., where photography itself is central to the values of the company.

@KrisAK - Why invent something you would not use? That is a waste of R&D money! Technology for its own sake is not the main goal. If any, you want it to seep into all divisions who can benefit from it. For example, why limit IBIS to cameras? If you can use them in smartphones, why not?

Remember - R&D cost money. If you can make other products or use it in as many products as you can, then you recover those costs faster!

Computational photography is another example. Do you think it will be just for photography? It will make more money once it is deployed to electric cars, autonomous driving! Even security/surveillance and medical applications can benefit from that!

So, yes, it is a way to leverage tech. And there is nothing wrong with that. Sigma is into lenses and cameras only. Fuji business is also less diverse and their R&D pockets less.

The other mistake is - you assume only traditional photography. When you take picture of lung or liver, that is also photography.

Link | Posted on Apr 4, 2019 at 14:43 UTC
In reply to:

Kaonashi: So basically, in a very convoluted way, they are saying that APS-C is not important and semi dead. Probably like Canon M will have to fade away slowly. A pity as I loved using my A6500 as my secondary system.

You have it backwards. It is very clear what is said.

APS-c is important. They just had to take care of 35FF first. That is very obvious. But aps-c is important simply because you need a presence there to cover the U$400-1,000 price points. Even if 35FF goes down to U$900, only aps-c can cover the U$400-800 and still earn a decent profit.

MFT is in trouble because they put their eggs in one basket. Remember, that aps-c can cover many things that 35FF cannot; and vice-versa. It's not just the lower price of APS-C. APS-C is better for sports, action, wildlife, birding, film making, etc. For Sony to abandon it is suicide!

Link | Posted on Apr 4, 2019 at 14:35 UTC

The interview is very revealing and Sony knows the main driver - technology. Or innovation. This is the main thing that creates the features and performance. This is the one that makes things happen! High ISO performance, wide DR, fast framerates, dual ISOs, eye-focus, fast sticky tracking, IBIS, etc, are all products of innovation. You don't have these tech's, you can't compete. It's as simple as that.

So, anybody who thinks cameras is not about technology will regret the lack of appreciation of innovation. It is to forget that Canon unseated Kodak and others because of innovation and technology they led in the early 2000! And to abandon it or do nothing to advance it will spell a decline in position, even possibly doom.

No wonder Sony is not worried. No wonder Canon was not worried either ca 2000-2009. When you have technological superiority, let them all come in. As long as they do not have mastery of the key techs, they do not have competitive advantage.

Link | Posted on Apr 4, 2019 at 14:30 UTC as 108th comment | 1 reply
In reply to:

(unknown member): What is the opinion of Sony E-Mount APS-C shooters of this interview?

@Thorgrem - I started with aps-c. And I will likely have both sensor sizes as both have their plus and minuses. My aps-c lensesa are 16-35, 18-105 f4, 50 f1.8 OSS, 55-210 OSS. yes, they will crop with the a7-3. I know that. I go down 10mp for stills. But for video and in a pinch, that's ok. I still get 4k in aps-c.

And that is the advantage. I don't have lots to consider. I just know I go down to 24mp in stills. The camera is set to go aps-c mode crop mode automatically, so I don't see the vignette. That's it. Otherwise, nothing's changed!

It means, I can get an a6400 and use all e-mount lenses regardless of which sensor size they are targetting. Period. I Just remind myself of the crop for aps-c lenses and lower resolution I get if I mount aps-c lenses to 35FF bodies. No other caveats or fine prints except for those 2.

Link | Posted on Apr 4, 2019 at 14:23 UTC
In reply to:

xedberg: "This is our one-mount strategy, which only Sony has. Initial entry is in APS-C, and the next step is full-frame. I want to make a kind of ‘step up ladder’."

Except if you buy a Sony APS-C camera with APS-C lenses, they wont work on full frame. They will fit, yeah, but will either vignette or be smaller resolution.

This whole "one mount" thing only applies if you buy full frame lenses and use them on your APS-C camera and later change to full frame camera. But who would buy a crazy expensive full frame 24-70 f2.8 and putting it on a A6500? What's the point?

@xedberg - it is obvious you don't know how sony cameras and their lenses operate. Of course it will vignette! Even Canon aps-c lenses will vignette on canon 35FF bodies (I have tried it)! Any aps-c lens will also obviously lose pixels simply because they are made to cover a smaller sensor! That is not exclusive to Sony only! Duh!

Your argument about putting 35FF lenses to aps-c bodies is a silly argument. You realize that Canon users have had to endure that for many years? Do you have a 100-400mm or 70-200mm aps-c specific lens? So, you are left using 35FF lenses! What's wrong with that? If you want to get 80mm FOV in aps-c, what is wrong with using a 50mm f1.8 lens?

But can you use your M mount lenses on the R/RP? That's what the statement is all about!

If ever, you even future proof yourself if you buy 35FF lenses to use in aps-c bodies! Why? Because you already have 35FF lenses if you decide to go larger sensors!

Link | Posted on Apr 4, 2019 at 14:16 UTC
In reply to:

Horshack: I get the impression from this interview Sony thinks APS-C stands for Another Potential Sony Customer...that needs to buy Full Frame.

@Horshack - Not necessarily so. For sure, there will be those who will like to step-up. But aps-c can be money makers too. Fuji is betting 95% of their future in aps-c and MF only for a niche market. They expect aps-c to be moneymakers. But you have to be smart about it and take it seriously.

But firms need aps-c not so much as for upgrading to larger sensors. Even if 35FF MILCs go down to U$1,000, only smaller sensors can cover the U$400-900 range. Sony or any firm needs to cover those price pts.

MFT's mistake is to put all their eggs in MFT. Canikon's mistake is not to take MILC seriously. Nikon has no aps-c MILC, and Canon's M series has no upgrade path to the R series.

Without a smaller sensor covering the sub U$1k market, you will lose the overall market. You can't just jump U$1,300 regardless of sensor size. You have to have something below that. And only aps-c or smaller sensors can fill that while allowing you to make a profit.

Link | Posted on Apr 4, 2019 at 14:06 UTC
In reply to:

Horshack: "What are priorities for sensor development? Speed, pixel count, dynamic range, video?"

Canon has repeatedly demonstrated that the priority for their sensor development is the utilization of the sunk capital investments in their older sensor fabs. That informs every decision they've made on what sensor features they can bring to the market.

@Horshack - I agree with what you say. You do understand the industry and what to look for evaluating things.

In fact, the simple answer to all the debate is - the products they produce now. Aside from DPAF, the DR, high ISO performance, has NOT improved a great deal the past 5 years. For me, that is proof enough that any patents or innovation they may have is only on paper and not really rolling out of the factory.

OTOH, look at what Sony and Fuji or others have been doing. You need not be an engineer to experience the metrics if you own these cameras. And these are massive investments not just in R&D but in the fabs, simply because to implement BSI, dual base ISO, or stacked sensor requires re-tooling and new equipment. This is why Sony is spending U$5-B in the next 3 years for this. What is Canon's investment on this alone? Add to that the lack of tech, even if they have the money to spend, there's no tech to build that can compete.

Link | Posted on Apr 4, 2019 at 00:31 UTC
In reply to:

ttran88: It sucks to be an early adapter, struggle with poor firmware and pay a premium for something like this adapter and to find out in a few months it's for free. These first generation products have such a high price premium with so many kinks.

@Critical Thinker - Most of the time, companies don't make a bundle on ver 1 of a new and different product. Early adopters are not that many especially past a certain price point. In the early days, I think the Canon d30 was around U$3,500. I very much doubt many bought it, nor Canon produced these in great numbers.

But firms do these not so much to earn a lot. Some even know it may even flop and they are willing to flop. They do it to learn and to test the market. They want to find out what they did wrong or where they can improve. Only by releasing a product can they truly learn what needs to be improved.

To lessen the risk, you sometimes scale it down and do minor cams. For the e-mount & MILC, Sony made aps-c cams first. Then the RX1 35FF was out to test the market. And the rest is history.

Link | Posted on Mar 20, 2019 at 02:37 UTC
On article Video: first impressions of the Canon EOS RP (410 comments in total)
In reply to:

mferencz: Canon looks to repeat success of 300d from years ago. Small, slightly disabled body at reasonable price for amateur. It ushered in the smaller sensor era. Expect it again. This time Sony beat them to the punch, but expect Nikon to soul search a bit to bring out a Z3 perhaps. Can't lose low cost base.

@Richard Butler - yes, you are correct. It is not so much as "crippled" as it is as good as it gets for them. I think it has something to do with a weak processor and maybe even a poor data read out off the sensor. But I think it's more of a weak processor (and/or poor algorithms/software).

Link | Posted on Mar 19, 2019 at 08:13 UTC
In reply to:

Krav Maga: They should have done this from the beginning. But, then again, they should have made a camera with dual card slots, too.

@Krav Maga - agreed. If you still don't have a slew of lenses to offer, best to give the adapter for free. Or a modest fee of say, U$50-80. Or bundle for free if they get it with a Z lens. It's hard to enjoy such expensive camera if you can't use other lenses and you have to pay U$250 for an adapter which is basically just a metal tube with pass through connectors!

But I think what killed them is the poor choice of using QXD cards. That is an added burden to the overall price! They should have stuck with sdxc uhs-I cards (or even II).

Link | Posted on Mar 19, 2019 at 08:08 UTC
In reply to:

xeppelin: aha, sales not going as well as hoped for. Discounting already started. lol

2 non-XQD slots would have done more than throwing in a free adapter, Nikon. I like that they are obviously severly punished for their stupid mistake. Sony XQD = today's Sony memory stick. Why on earth did Nikon fall for it? Why not 2 UHS II or even better UHS III SD slots?

I will continue to totally boycot any device that does not have (Micro-) SD-type slot(s).

@xpellin - though I agree and sympathatize with you on the root kit issue, realize the ff:

1- that happened years ago, where the CEO and even the head of that business unit is now different.

2 - that Sony is a conglomerate. Each business unit is independent to a large degree. And it has to be so. They can be so diverse that each one is run with it's own rules, vision, strategy and methodology. The games division is not the same as the movie or the music division, as is the camera or sensor/semi-con division. To blame Sony overall is not a good way to ascribe blame.

3 - You have to let go and forgive. Because if you don't you won't find any firm who do these things from time to time or even often. Canon may not do that, but they are nasty on crippling cameras, charging high for inks in printers, etc.

4 - If you don't move one, you might find yourself not using the best later one because of that chip on your shoulder w/c points 1-3 is the reason why you should lose it.

Link | Posted on Mar 19, 2019 at 08:04 UTC
In reply to:

ttran88: It sucks to be an early adapter, struggle with poor firmware and pay a premium for something like this adapter and to find out in a few months it's for free. These first generation products have such a high price premium with so many kinks.

@ttran88 - this is why it is better to wait for version 3 or 4 of any product. It is rare that any company gets it right on ver 1. The Sony is ver 3. This is why I didn't get the mark 1 or 2 even if they were heavily discounted. Though if you want to just dip your hands on MILCs, the A7-2 is just fine. But even 5 years from now, the a7-3 is still going to be very viable. Normally, it takes 7-8 years for a product to be way outclassed by the newer models once you've reach ver 3 or 4. For example, if you got a canon 600d, you'd probably notice big improvements that is worth by the time of the 750d or 800d. In effect that is still 2-3 versions newer than what you have now.

For some, the improvements are not worth upgrading. You can still own a 10 year old 5d2 and still be happy if your needs are modest. But if you want better AF, 4k video, bettter IQ, it will be time to upgrade.

Link | Posted on Mar 19, 2019 at 07:56 UTC
In reply to:

Anulu: Must to be boosted the very slow sales

@NexLupus - you are not comparing properly. The A9 is a different camera w/c has not equivalent in MILC. Even the 1DX2 and D5 can't match what it can do and those are about U$5-6k each. And those are what the A9 is battling.

2 - Sony traditionally drops about U$100 on the first year since intro of a model, and another U$150-200 on the 2nd year. It could vary by U$50-100-150 depending. But the big drop of the A9 could mean one thing - the A9-2 will be released soon (my guess is end of 2019). Sony usually drops prices by U$500 on avg 4-7 months before release of a new model.

Also, even if the market is not expanding, if they were selling 100 units per month b4 Canikon came in and still are selling about the same after they came in, then 100 units is still 100 units. Don't automatically assume that Sony's will pay for that. If any, nikon is the one paying for that difference as they are no 3 now. @Anulu is correct in his example to explain market share.

Link | Posted on Mar 19, 2019 at 07:50 UTC
On article Video: first impressions of the Canon EOS RP (410 comments in total)
In reply to:

mferencz: Canon looks to repeat success of 300d from years ago. Small, slightly disabled body at reasonable price for amateur. It ushered in the smaller sensor era. Expect it again. This time Sony beat them to the punch, but expect Nikon to soul search a bit to bring out a Z3 perhaps. Can't lose low cost base.

@marc petzold - it is debatable to a degree if Sony needs an A6/A5 (or whatever they will call it). The trouble with the older A7-1 & A7-2 is not the IQ. It's up there. But in AF, lack of 4k (even if Canon's is crippled) is telling. It's not so much the price but capabilities, even if the RP is still limited. But most shooters will notice the quick AF. And the A7-1&2 are way behind there. That's one tangible feature that kills it.

So, if an A6 does come out, at U$1,500 with kit lens, an effective 35FF a6400, that douses most issue right off the bat. Sony can still offer the A7-2 or whatever for those who really are price conscious. But even if the A6 does not force switchers, for sure, existing A7-3, A7-1-2, A7R-2-3 users can easily be swayed with a 2nd body. For the A7-1-2, an A6 would be a welcome upgrade! So, it makes sense for Sony to release a low cost version.

Link | Posted on Mar 14, 2019 at 04:41 UTC
On article DPReview TV: Canon EOS RP review (360 comments in total)

This is a smart, if not desperate move by Canon. The RP caters to the remaining entrenched fans. Yes, it may turn some back to canon from other brands, but basically, the goal is to keep the loyal in. With a shrinking market, and inability to match up to other brands due to lack of innovation, competing on price is one of the few options left.

I think 80-90% of those who got an M camera don't really have plans to move up. It's not the sensor size. It's the cost. Even at U$1.3k, that is still steep, + w/out cheap lenses, the move is ill adviced. One can't even use M lenses on the RP. And those 80% really just want a small easy to use camera.

The trouble with the RP is, it does not prevent others from doing the same. Sony could just create an A6 line at U$1,500 with std kit lens. It would be an a6400 shooting at 8fps with AF-C & no video caveats. If any, this move probably helps pave the way for that. I don't think Sony will do that, but if they do, it's good for all.

Link | Posted on Mar 3, 2019 at 01:32 UTC as 37th comment | 6 replies
On article Sony announces FE 135mm F1.8 G Master lens (406 comments in total)
In reply to:

caterpillar: Though many will consider this as a portrait lens or medium-long telephoto prime, I look at this as another nail in the sports/action photography. Those who do indoor sports like gymnastics, or volleyball will now have a fast lens for such applications. I used to use my 100 f2.0 usm in the past for such purposes.

I think this is one of those lenses before they release their 500mm or 600mm or 200-600mm for the 2020 Tokyo Olympics.

@Armandino - As you realize, it's not just a fast or wide opening that is needed for sports. An accurate and fast AF and AF tracking is a must too. Otherwise, the lens is relegated for static or not so much moving subjects like models.

Is it any wonder that the Sony 135 f1.8 uses twin rails for AF? Those who don't do sports will probably not notice the difference between this and the Sigma. But once you are tracking a running gymnast on the floor exercise, or a hockey player driving to hit the puck, all indoor sports, then you realize that that 1 stop difference (f2.8 vs f2.0) matters. It is the difference between freezing the subject or not. If at f2.8 you get 1/250, then at f1.8, you might get 1/640 which is a big difference in stopping motion!

So, this is not just a portrait lens. This can be used for action photography too!

Link | Posted on Feb 28, 2019 at 14:52 UTC
On article Sony announces FE 135mm F1.8 G Master lens (406 comments in total)
In reply to:

caterpillar: Though many will consider this as a portrait lens or medium-long telephoto prime, I look at this as another nail in the sports/action photography. Those who do indoor sports like gymnastics, or volleyball will now have a fast lens for such applications. I used to use my 100 f2.0 usm in the past for such purposes.

I think this is one of those lenses before they release their 500mm or 600mm or 200-600mm for the 2020 Tokyo Olympics.

@keeponkeepingon - For outdoor sports, f2.8 is usually enough. The f2.8 70-200, 300, or 400 are most used. Indoor sports is a different matter. Indoor sports usually have inadequate lighting. F2.8 is not going to be enough to freeze motion. Except the new canon 28-70 f2.0 R lens, most zooms go at f2.8. In such cases only primes are the option. And having used my canon 100 f2.0 usm it can still be short in some instance So, in a 35FF, the 135mm is just fine. Use it on an a6400, and you have a 202.5mm prime.

Most of the time you are in the seats and you can't get closer or not supposed to get closer even if you are the official photographer. And unless you are on top of the seats/bleachers, 135mm should be fine, though you may have to crop in certain situations. Again, there is no f1.8 200mm for E at this time. For wider, you can always use the 50mm or 35mm or 24mm f1.x.

Link | Posted on Feb 28, 2019 at 14:46 UTC
On article Video: first impressions of the Canon EOS RP (410 comments in total)
In reply to:

mferencz: Canon looks to repeat success of 300d from years ago. Small, slightly disabled body at reasonable price for amateur. It ushered in the smaller sensor era. Expect it again. This time Sony beat them to the punch, but expect Nikon to soul search a bit to bring out a Z3 perhaps. Can't lose low cost base.

@mferencz -

No, Canon is not done. The FS will determine that. The same way that Kodak & Minolta exited. But that will take a while. They are still fighting. But without innovation, in time, people will realize they can't compete. They can always use their brand to push the fans along, but in time, the tech gap will show.

The 300d used the same 10d sensor. It took Nikon about 1 year to release the d70 to compete, which was horrible in color and buggy. It took another 1.5-2 years before Nikon finally fixed things. Today, Canon is no longer leading. Sony and others are. So, a lower priced RP just signal a price war. Sony can always respond with an A6.

BTW, having millions of legacy lenses is not a good indicator of a company surviving. Kodak had millions of Nikon lenses at its disposal for its dlsr. Minolta had the same.

FYI, I don't wish Canon to fold. Competition is always good. But w/o R&D and investment (Sony is putting U$5-B in sensor dev't in 3 yrs), the gap will grow.

Link | Posted on Feb 27, 2019 at 01:27 UTC
On article Sony announces FE 135mm F1.8 G Master lens (406 comments in total)

Though many will consider this as a portrait lens or medium-long telephoto prime, I look at this as another nail in the sports/action photography. Those who do indoor sports like gymnastics, or volleyball will now have a fast lens for such applications. I used to use my 100 f2.0 usm in the past for such purposes.

I think this is one of those lenses before they release their 500mm or 600mm or 200-600mm for the 2020 Tokyo Olympics.

Link | Posted on Feb 27, 2019 at 01:17 UTC as 20th comment | 6 replies
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