caterpillar

Lives in Philippines Quezon City, Philippines
Joined on Sep 16, 2002
About me:

Equipment: Sony a7 iii, Sony a5100, nex-5T, Lumix gx7, 20D. Panasonic fz-1000
Lenses - ef 85 f1.8 usm, ef-s 10-22 f3.5-4.5, ef 70-200 f2.8L IS, efs 18-135 STM, 50mm f1.8 STM
The Tamron 17-35 f2.8-4.0 Di, Sony 16-50 f3.5-5.6 OSS, 55-210 f4.6.3 OSS, 18-105 f4 PZ OSS. Lumix 12-35 f2.8 I, 12-60 f3.5-60 OIS, Oly 45 f1.8, PL 15mm f1.7, PL 24 f1.4.
Plan to get a sony sel 24-240, tamron 28-75 f2.8.

Love sports/action, portraits, candid, street, photography. Love doing weddings and happy events.

Comments

Total: 304, showing: 1 – 20
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On article Interview: Colin Goudie, feature film editor (35 comments in total)
In reply to:

Horshack: Interesting how the editor's biggest challenge is all the extra footage directors shoot with digital vs film. That would seem to shift the burden of the film's vision and assembly even more to the editor.

This is not new to those who have been into video for a long time. This was true even in the events/weddings industry. In the tape age, we try to limit a wedding to around 3-4 hours of raw footage. Firewire transfers were 1:1. It mean you have 3-4 hrs footage = 3-4 hrs transfer time! And you also have less material to wade through in editing.
With the advent of cheap videocams & SD cards, & multi camera setups, + transfer times of mins instead of hours, one can have 10-30 hours footage to wade through!
The solution is still to be selective in shooting, roll on continuously in only the most important parts of the wedding. Even at receptions, learn to cut aggressively, trim away useless materials. Think of limiting the final product to 15-45min tops. And be ready to provide a longer cut (w/c is easier to edit as it is linear and just free flowing) as a 2nd submission. The long cut also serves as a preview and getting familiar with what you have, so it's not really a waste of time.

Link | Posted on Aug 25, 2019 at 02:24 UTC
In reply to:

StoneJack: In interesting times we live. First mirrorless appeared as a cheaper alternative to DSLR. Gradually the mirrorless became more and more expensive especially as full frame mirrorless cameras grew.

I have a feeling that actually cheaper DSLR may end up being a more cost effective solution to photography than mirrorless.

Mirrorless are good as hybrid cameras- which is, for shooting video. I am not sure that all who in photography, want to shoot video, especially on full frame. Mirrorless PDAF just have a better focus, than DSLR, except the Canon's dual pixel in video.

Those who don't shoot video, may as well stick to DSLR or MFT. There is aint difference in photos shoot by either.

My point is that full frame mirrorless, is probably nearing saturation as well. Everyone who wanted FF mirrorless, bought one and it was Sony brand. Now Canon, Nikon and Panasonic are in. From all models in Japan's April camera market data, Nikon Panasonic showed steady growth, Sony was rebounding.

Why do people assume that MILCs are only occupying a higher price bracket? Aren't the M or a6000 series entry level prices? This has been so, for many years! What is certain is that DSLRs are dying fast.

However, Pricing cameras at U$1,300-2k is the range that will give a comfortable profit hence why it was secured 1st. Smartphones will eventually eat the u$350-650 range. The new low end could be U$800-1000. Unfortunately, DSLRs can't compete in specs and performance if you still front a dslr there. The 6400 and xt-30 are examples of this. They are untouchable by any dslr at the same price bracket or even higher than that.

3-5 yrs from now, there will still be U$500-700 cameras. 90% though will be MILCs. Likely the a6400 will be at U$650 and a6300 will be at U$500. Even if the margins are nil, Sony will still build them if only as an entry point for new buyers or those who want something cheap. You always maintain a presence in the low end as a bridge to the high end.

Link | Posted on May 19, 2019 at 06:55 UTC
In reply to:

JanMatthys: Overall good review, Nikon is def 2 generations behind Sony in mirrorless, I love where Panny is going with their system, would love to see the review when versions 2.0 from Nikon & Panny come out

@Revenant - I thought Panny "got" the same sensor as Nikon. I suppose they opted for the "cheaper" one since they will use DFD. If it is just masked, then they are still there. Of course, it is not that simple to unmask them once they are made.

People are overestimating eye-focus and other software based tech. It took Sony a while to get eye-focus this good. This is why some implementations lose E-F when subject is far, or won't be be able to track as quickly. You can claim you have it, but actual performance is still a ways off. Whether they'll get it to Sony standards in 6-8 months, I don't know. I am sure though, that Canon will not.

Link | Posted on May 5, 2019 at 00:20 UTC
In reply to:

Hautedawg: The great thing is that Sony is a tech company first and foremost, so they will never sit idle and stop innovating and pushing the boundaries unlike Canon. Canikon fanboys hate Sony for dominating as of late, but need to be thanking them for pushing the industry forward.

@Hautedwg - agree. I've always said that this business is all about innovation. You don't innovate, you die. The bar is the A7-iii. Until the competitors can make one under their brand, the low sales will continue. Sony is at least 3 years ahead. I very much Canon can catch up even by 2020. They can narrow the gap if they swallow their pride and start buying Sony sensors. But they won't do that.

But as we see from Nikon, using Sony sensors will still not make you an a7-iii. You need to improve your software and processor! Even Panny, w/ 10 years MILC experience still have to improve their software and other areas. they should start using PDAF to narrow the gap w/ Sony especially when C-N are way behind in Video. Make compelling 35FF MILCs to carve their own niche!

Link | Posted on May 4, 2019 at 15:08 UTC
In reply to:

JanMatthys: Overall good review, Nikon is def 2 generations behind Sony in mirrorless, I love where Panny is going with their system, would love to see the review when versions 2.0 from Nikon & Panny come out

Panasonic's best play is to start using PDAF. They have Sony sensors anyway, so they just have to activate it. DFD, is definitely going to set them back. If they had PDAF on these cameras, there's little to fault them. In fact, they will be very good cameras and will definitley catch up very closely with Sony in gen 2.

Link | Posted on May 4, 2019 at 14:37 UTC
In reply to:

jay-A: The shrinking camera market is a nice try at finding an excuse but no cigar - other companies do not forecast lowering profits. Sony is actually increasing its profits as they get the rewards of innovation through increasing sales of high-margin products.

Canon, OTOH, is now really falling into irrelevance, a move that has started since mirrorless came it. There is a limit in the strategy of flooding the market with low profit, low innovation products.

@Jay-A, I agree on all your points.

For P&S, it need not die. Sony has the RX100 and RX10 that does well. Though we don't know how it will do 5 years from now, surely, there is a place for P&S if you know how to play or spec it well. Right now, one is for extreme portability but full of specs/features, you have the RX100. For superzoom range or an all-in-one camera, the RX10. No doubt the other std, tradional P&S will eventually die, if not dead already. But I think there is a place for a small powerful rocket P&S and a decent superzoom. That 1" sensor justifies it, and even if they price it lower, it will still make money.

Canikon can't tap on these 2 because they don't have the tech to go 1-on-1.

Link | Posted on Apr 20, 2019 at 05:38 UTC

To those who like to quote that Canon is no 1 in sales (volume), this is why you should not use that as a metric as the one that determines if a firm is healthy or not. Even if you have 16 years of being no 1. at the end of the day, it's still the bottom line. Just check out their FS and you will see, they have had way lower quarterly reports for the past 5-6 quarters. And their yearly FS shows they are way down.

Now, check their competitors and find that they are not as hit as much or even doing well, even if they are not no 1 or 2, or even 3 in sales volume. Selling more, does not necessarily equate to more profits, not if you are selling at the low end where margins are thin. A company can go on even selling 100,000 units if the margins are high. But even selling 1M cameras at small margins can put you in the red. Thus, market share does not indicate how good a company is really doing.

Bottom line - it's the bottom line that matters!

Link | Posted on Apr 20, 2019 at 00:07 UTC as 141st comment
On article Sony a6400 review (1238 comments in total)
In reply to:

SridharC: Is there a still reason to get A7III? I have an A7III and it has great autofocus but no so great JPEGs. Does it make sense for someone to just get 6400 instead?

@SridarC - Yes, the A7-3 is still very viable. But if you intend to shoot real fast action sports, the a6400 will be a better choice. The firmware update will not improve tracking that much in the A7-3. It's just adding animal eye-focus and the no more need to press the AF-On button and the shutter button can activate the eye-focus upon half-press. But tracking of fast subjects still goes with the a6400.

Link | Posted on Apr 11, 2019 at 00:19 UTC
On article Sony a6400 review (1238 comments in total)
In reply to:

avatar77: As a former A6000 owner who was ready to turn the page when the a6400 was announced, one look at the a6400 was enough to know that I was going to be leaving the Sony APS-C world altogether. All of the control and ergonomic shortcomings that made shooting with the a6000 a rather joyless task remain in the a6400.

@avatar77 - one's preference does not necessarily reflect most or majority's preference. As far as ergo's go, that is subjective. Even more telling is that the world has already voted and if Sony's ergonomics are really that bad, they would not sell as much. Again, their FS reflects that. So, in terms of popularity and market acceptance, your claim is not true.

In fact, it's just plain complaining and anti-sony. Now, you may have your dislikes and likes. Fine. But if one is to complain about Sony, then it shouldn't be just Sony. As I wrote earlier, other brands is as bad, and even worse. But few talk about bad ergonomics or menu system of Fuji or Olympus. So, this Sony bashing is more of a resentment that many feel (not necessarily you), that their favored brand is threatened and being beaten. A silly thing really, but many consider Sony a threat.

And rightly so. But it should be only from a firm's POV. As consumers, just buy whatever suits you.

Link | Posted on Apr 11, 2019 at 00:16 UTC
On article Sony a6400 review (1238 comments in total)
In reply to:

caterpillar: The a6400's AF-C and eye-focus (even for animals) basically renders the joystick and Canon's crude R slider inutile. They are no longer needed except for some demanding users or in some applications. But if you have touch to focus and track, you start wondering why you need mechanical focusing mechanisms anymore!

This also lowers cost, simplifies manufacturing. In these times where photography is diminishing in sales, this is important. This is also not easily copyable by others. This is a software R&D. Competitor's gazillions AF points or h/w does not make it track well or have good eye-focus implementation. Canikon arestill 2-3 years behind this tech.

Bottom line is - like the joystick before, this is the new standard of how we indicate where to focus. By default, if not selected, the eyes are targetted automatically if present. This is a huge competitive advantage! Anybody who does portraits, weddings/events, sports/action, birding/wildlife will benefit from this.

@Rishi Sanyal - thanks for your input. Yes, I agree.

The touch screen to change the subject to be tracked can be useful too. For example, I am shooting a baseball game. My kid is my main subject. But with a touch of the screen, I can go immediately to the pitcher, then my kid, maybe the 1st base guy, etc. Or in a soccer game, I can switch subjects from player 1 to 2 or to the goalie. It's much easier to do this by touching the screen then let the camera do the tracking from there.

I can think of a 100mm sprint or down the wire finish where the last 100m is over in just 12-13 seconds. In a 2-3 or 4 man sprint down the line, I can just touch the person I want to focus/track. That's still going to be faster than moving a joystick.

Link | Posted on Apr 10, 2019 at 02:03 UTC
On article Sony a6400 review (1238 comments in total)
In reply to:

ShaiKhulud: I love how trolls are moaning about ergonomics where the whole point of new Realtime AF is to make controls unnecessary. Stop with this copypaste, I'm reading this kind of nonsence since NEX-7 release (and that was perfectly capable and convenient camera for me, despite my previous 50D experience).

To be perfectly honest with you, cameras these days are so smart, I rarely change anything besides very few settings. And both aperture and shutter speeds are not that hard to reach even on crappitest cameras, guys.

If you want to use equipment 100% you will adapt to anything, really. And almost every camera today is OK to use, there is no such thing right now as truly bad ergonomics (except the cheapest Rebels, maybe). If you really want to use something really bad, try broadcasting camcoders from Panasonic or Canon. I dare you.

@Thematic - you forgot overheating. Non issue now.

Also, others (like Fuji) put a time cap for video so they won't reach the overheating temp. So, it's not as if Sony is the only one which can overheat.

Others have smaller sensor (MFT) so they don't overheat.

Basically, the litany of complaints is getting few and thin. It's just complaining for the sake of complaining. Even the menus are no longer issues. And it's not as if Fuji, Olympus aren't culprits themselves. Sometimes, even worse. But of course, the die-hards will thrown stones at the only nemesis that can threaten their brand.

But where it matters most - DR, high ISO performance, AF-C, eye-focus, tracking, etc. competitors cannot respond. Sony's AF-C/tracking/eye-focus is about 2 years ahead of Canikon. They cannot solve this by just having 5,000 AF points! These features are software made. They are algorithms. Plus you are going to need a good processor to manage such data! These are things Canon is lagging.

Link | Posted on Apr 10, 2019 at 01:31 UTC
On article Sony a6400 review (1238 comments in total)
In reply to:

avatar77: As a former A6000 owner who was ready to turn the page when the a6400 was announced, one look at the a6400 was enough to know that I was going to be leaving the Sony APS-C world altogether. All of the control and ergonomic shortcomings that made shooting with the a6000 a rather joyless task remain in the a6400.

@avatar77 - I am glad you know which is good for you. Good luck with your switch!

FYI, your "ergonomic shortcomings" is not reflected by the brisk sales of Sony's cameras all over the world. In most places, the ergo issue is a non-issue. Sony's FS also shows they are doing way better than Canon in spite of the latter selling more cameras. That means that Sony is selling more expensive "ergonomically bad" cameras.

Speaking of Canon (and other cameras), why do people continually harp about Sony's ergonomics? The M6 is even worse as the m100 and older models. Even Fuji's XT-x0 series is not exactly a model of ergonomics! Even Oly's Pen cams have questionable ergos. But nobody throws the ergo complaints against them. It seems most people are just finding something to complain about.
As for control, I find Oly's or Fuji's menu system confusing. So, this is a matter of training and just getting used to. If you program Sony's Mymenu, & buttons, you don't really use the menu anymore.

Link | Posted on Apr 10, 2019 at 01:21 UTC
On article Sony a6400 review (1238 comments in total)
In reply to:

(unknown member): I test drove one for a week. Its a nice camera. About 95% of what I do doesn't benefit from the improved autofocus, and none of the cameras I've used recently had problems with missing shots anyway.
The big let down for me is the darned off center EVF. I normally use my left eye and it makes the cameras mediocre interface even harder to use. Panasonic has a few similar cameras that I find just as bad (so it is not a "Sony" thing.

I switch to an X-T30. The interface is far from perfect (darned Q button!), but much nicer than the A6400, and much more of a joy to use. The jpegs are very much nicer, and the eye AF hasn't failed me yet (though like I said, I don't use it that often).

So I agree with most reviews. The A6400 is a great technology camera, but it is not as enjoyable to use as other cameras. The off set EVF makes it even worse for me (I won't even try the GX95 because I know I won't like it either).

@Scotty Piper - 95%, but most likely 95-98% of users will benefit from Sony's AF and eye-focus. Landscape or architectural, or some type of photography may not even need this. But there are more which will:
- potraits
- wedding/events
- sports/action
- birders
- wildlife
- street
- etc.

Besides this, the a6400 has no serious 4k caveats or 30min video limit, longer batt life, no overeating, etc. etc. This tech alone is not easily copied by others at this time. They are probably at least 2 years behind this tech. And it is not h/w that drives it, but software.

As for being left type EVF, well, that is lame complaint. Other cameras are basically the same. Plus, having the EVF in the center does not necessarily solve your problem. Your nose is still going to touch the rear LCD. AFAIK, there's no camera that has the EVF to the right. So, you are complaining about something that is true for all. You'd best to just learn how to shoot w/ EVF to the left.

Link | Posted on Apr 10, 2019 at 01:12 UTC
On article Sony a6400 review (1238 comments in total)

The a6400's AF-C and eye-focus (even for animals) basically renders the joystick and Canon's crude R slider inutile. They are no longer needed except for some demanding users or in some applications. But if you have touch to focus and track, you start wondering why you need mechanical focusing mechanisms anymore!

This also lowers cost, simplifies manufacturing. In these times where photography is diminishing in sales, this is important. This is also not easily copyable by others. This is a software R&D. Competitor's gazillions AF points or h/w does not make it track well or have good eye-focus implementation. Canikon arestill 2-3 years behind this tech.

Bottom line is - like the joystick before, this is the new standard of how we indicate where to focus. By default, if not selected, the eyes are targetted automatically if present. This is a huge competitive advantage! Anybody who does portraits, weddings/events, sports/action, birding/wildlife will benefit from this.

Link | Posted on Apr 10, 2019 at 01:01 UTC as 202nd comment | 14 replies
On article Panasonic Lumix DC-G95/G90 Review (660 comments in total)
In reply to:

eno2: Bad CDAF only AF performance, huge 4K video crop, pour battery life and a lower image quality, all at at the above at $1199 price tag.

Both the A6400 and XT30 look like bargains by comparison!

@eno2 - it's obvious you have not used a panasonic camera. FYI, the AF is very fast in single mode. It's even faster than some PDAF! And that is even using an Olympus lens that is not large in aperture either! It's in video or AF-C that it is weak. AF tracking is not as good as PDAF like Sony's or Canon.

For battery life, I can get around 1:20 hours on the G85. My guess that is on par with the a6400. I am not sure of the no of shots, I get, but I am sure I get more than 300-320 on the G85. I expect this to have the same performance.

As for the 4k crop, yes, it can be annoying. I don't understand that. But it's not really excessive as you make it sound.

For U$1,200, now that is too much. I'd rather go for the XT-3 for U$200 more. I expect the g90 to settle down to sub U$1,000 in 3-6 months. Or, go for the XT-30 or a6400 if you are after better AF, and other features. If MFT is your thing, maybe the G9 is a better buy. U$1,200 is too much to ask for this.

Link | Posted on Apr 6, 2019 at 01:35 UTC
On article DPReview TV: Panasonic G95 first impressions review (72 comments in total)

If you already have the g85, better skip this release. If you are coming from a gx85 or a g7, this is a good upgrade.

If you are with other systems, the xt-30 and a6400 or even the older a6300/a6500 are tough competitors and may not sway you to this, especially if AF-C is a big concern and you already have lenses invested.

It is a good model though I find the price a bit too high. If it eventually settles down to U$800-850, it should be competitive.

Link | Posted on Apr 6, 2019 at 00:25 UTC as 18th comment | 3 replies
In reply to:

KrisAK: I get the sense that 'photography' is merely a way for Sony to profitably leverage its tech. This is in stark contrasts to what I've read in interviews with Sigma, Fuji, etc., where photography itself is central to the values of the company.

@KrisAK - Why invent something you would not use? That is a waste of R&D money! Technology for its own sake is not the main goal. If any, you want it to seep into all divisions who can benefit from it. For example, why limit IBIS to cameras? If you can use them in smartphones, why not?

Remember - R&D cost money. If you can make other products or use it in as many products as you can, then you recover those costs faster!

Computational photography is another example. Do you think it will be just for photography? It will make more money once it is deployed to electric cars, autonomous driving! Even security/surveillance and medical applications can benefit from that!

So, yes, it is a way to leverage tech. And there is nothing wrong with that. Sigma is into lenses and cameras only. Fuji business is also less diverse and their R&D pockets less.

The other mistake is - you assume only traditional photography. When you take picture of lung or liver, that is also photography.

Link | Posted on Apr 4, 2019 at 14:43 UTC
In reply to:

Kaonashi: So basically, in a very convoluted way, they are saying that APS-C is not important and semi dead. Probably like Canon M will have to fade away slowly. A pity as I loved using my A6500 as my secondary system.

You have it backwards. It is very clear what is said.

APS-c is important. They just had to take care of 35FF first. That is very obvious. But aps-c is important simply because you need a presence there to cover the U$400-1,000 price points. Even if 35FF goes down to U$900, only aps-c can cover the U$400-800 and still earn a decent profit.

MFT is in trouble because they put their eggs in one basket. Remember, that aps-c can cover many things that 35FF cannot; and vice-versa. It's not just the lower price of APS-C. APS-C is better for sports, action, wildlife, birding, film making, etc. For Sony to abandon it is suicide!

Link | Posted on Apr 4, 2019 at 14:35 UTC

The interview is very revealing and Sony knows the main driver - technology. Or innovation. This is the main thing that creates the features and performance. This is the one that makes things happen! High ISO performance, wide DR, fast framerates, dual ISOs, eye-focus, fast sticky tracking, IBIS, etc, are all products of innovation. You don't have these tech's, you can't compete. It's as simple as that.

So, anybody who thinks cameras is not about technology will regret the lack of appreciation of innovation. It is to forget that Canon unseated Kodak and others because of innovation and technology they led in the early 2000! And to abandon it or do nothing to advance it will spell a decline in position, even possibly doom.

No wonder Sony is not worried. No wonder Canon was not worried either ca 2000-2009. When you have technological superiority, let them all come in. As long as they do not have mastery of the key techs, they do not have competitive advantage.

Link | Posted on Apr 4, 2019 at 14:30 UTC as 108th comment | 1 reply
In reply to:

Thorgrem: What is the opinion of Sony E-Mount APS-C shooters of this interview?

@Thorgrem - I started with aps-c. And I will likely have both sensor sizes as both have their plus and minuses. My aps-c lensesa are 16-35, 18-105 f4, 50 f1.8 OSS, 55-210 OSS. yes, they will crop with the a7-3. I know that. I go down 10mp for stills. But for video and in a pinch, that's ok. I still get 4k in aps-c.

And that is the advantage. I don't have lots to consider. I just know I go down to 24mp in stills. The camera is set to go aps-c mode crop mode automatically, so I don't see the vignette. That's it. Otherwise, nothing's changed!

It means, I can get an a6400 and use all e-mount lenses regardless of which sensor size they are targetting. Period. I Just remind myself of the crop for aps-c lenses and lower resolution I get if I mount aps-c lenses to 35FF bodies. No other caveats or fine prints except for those 2.

Link | Posted on Apr 4, 2019 at 14:23 UTC
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