Nikonparrothead

Lives in United States Longboat Key, FL, United States
Works as a Editor
Joined on Mar 21, 2004

Comments

Total: 68, showing: 1 – 20
« First‹ Previous1234Next ›Last »
In reply to:

AlwaysLiveView: Nikon, FF is really only needed by a small segment of the high end market. Make your first mirror-free professional camera an aps-c, and make it the best camera you have ever made. Take the Samsung (what did Sam sing?) NX1 as the starting point, and just dazzle us with what a camera can be. You can do it, you’ve done it before, in the middle of the last century. I remember; yes I’m that old, but still snapping.

It all depends on sensor cost. If there's still a dramatic difference in the cost of a FX chip vs a DX chip, then a DX camera may come first. Otherwise, Nikon may skip that step. in M 4/3 land the big concerns are better background separation (DOF) and better low-light performance/dynamic range.

The easiest solution for both would be a larger sensor.

Link | Posted on Jan 15, 2018 at 19:25 UTC
In reply to:

sirhawkeye64: Hopefully there will be an adapter to go from the "Z" mount to F mount lenses....? Especially if the camera will be FF.... that would be nice (and much cheaper for everyone). Please, Nikon, if you do introduce a new mount, please create a fully-electronic adapter, like you did for the Nikon 1 series... I would hate to have to buy my lens trilogy over again for the mirrorless line...

But I mean considering Nikon hasn't changed their mount for their SLR-style cameras in decades, I guess a new mounting system is not out of the orindary (I mean, other camera manufacturers have changed, and have different mounts for their mirrorless and SLR-style cameras). But it would be nice if they could maintain the same mount or offer an adapter for those of us who already own a lot of high-end FF Nikon glass.

Consider that the last time Nikon made a major change to its mount was when it went from the S mount rangefinder to the F mount, you're probably right.

When you consider that the original allure of the 4/3 and M 4/3 system was the ability to use all types of glass with adapters, I'd think that any mirrorless system would have that type of provision — at least with the OEM lenses.

Sony came out with that A to E mount adapter for its mirrorless gear, so I'd expect Nikon to do something similar. Especially because, if they don't there's no incentive for Nikon users to not jump ship to Sony (someday soon, someone will come up with a Nikon to Sony adapter that enables AF that doesn't create more problems that it solves).

The type of native lenses Nikon releases will help reveal who Nikon is targeting the mirrorless camera for.

Link | Posted on Jan 15, 2018 at 19:20 UTC
On article Have your say: Best high-end ILC of 2017 (173 comments in total)
In reply to:

racin06: I just learned something...MFT cameras are "high end"' and APS-C cameras are not.

I think it's wonderful that Fuji's been successful in APS-C. I'm not sure whether they released a high level APS-C camera this year. I saw Fuji entries in the other designation. This isn't a rolling poll, it only considers cameras released (or in the G9's case, announced) in 2017).

Link | Posted on Dec 18, 2017 at 13:47 UTC
On article Have your say: Best high-end ILC of 2017 (173 comments in total)
In reply to:

racin06: I just learned something...MFT cameras are "high end"' and APS-C cameras are not.

Nikon did the D500 last year and the mid level D7500 this year. I don't follow Canon designations that much but I believe the single numeral 7D would qualify as "flagship" while the 77D would be mid level. The 7D2 was at least a year ago, the 77D this year. (Not sure at all how Fuji and Pentax designate things).

Link | Posted on Dec 18, 2017 at 10:23 UTC
On article Have your say: Best high-end ILC of 2017 (173 comments in total)
In reply to:

Nikonparrothead: Why is the G9, a camera that won't ship until 2018, listed?

Those movies have usually been released in a minimum number of theaters in big cities. But anyone could see them. Releasing a camera to a couple of reviewers isn't the same thing -- to me at least.

Link | Posted on Dec 18, 2017 at 10:19 UTC
On article Have your say: Best high-end ILC of 2017 (173 comments in total)

Why is the G9, a camera that won't ship until 2018, listed?

Link | Posted on Dec 17, 2017 at 16:35 UTC as 23rd comment | 2 replies
In reply to:

Paul.R.Lindqvist: Cool to see the Elinchrom skyport protocol being used after it's been set free. :-)

Good to know. I've got HS triggers for my Elinchrom gear and have been contemplating using a Neo 2 in lieu of a speedlight in some situations.

Link | Posted on Nov 25, 2017 at 21:37 UTC
In reply to:

Paul.R.Lindqvist: Cool to see the Elinchrom skyport protocol being used after it's been set free. :-)

I'm still waiting to heR whether one can use existing HS triggers on these (with or without a firmware update) and have full functionality.

Link | Posted on Nov 25, 2017 at 16:07 UTC
On article Panasonic Lumix DC-G9 first impressions (411 comments in total)
In reply to:

joelakeland: For an m43 enthusiast with specific tech needs, this looks to be a great solution. For dedicated stills shooter seeking the best available image quality this is not the answer.

I've owned and like Panasonic cameras in the G and GX series. For me, this one jumped the shark with its size alone.

Body size is not the only advantage of M4/3. Lens size factors in too. Though realistically any camera body with an extra battery grip is going to be oversized compared to the original intent of the format.

Image quality comes down to preferences of the end user. For newspaper work (what few are left) and most web work, the IQ is just fine.

Time will tell if this or the Oly EMI II be one must carries for daily shooters who earn money.

Link | Posted on Nov 10, 2017 at 13:07 UTC

Nice way for Godox to broaden its appeal.

Link | Posted on Nov 7, 2017 at 17:45 UTC as 6th comment
In reply to:

Charley123: I don't think we can pick a side when we've only heard one side.

However, I have personally worked as a computer programmer and photographer. As a programmer I worked sometimes as employee and other times as contactor. They both have their,good and bad points. An objectionable situation occurred with one company that called me a subcontractor on the books, but treated me as a contactor when it benefited them, and treated me as an employee when it benefited them. That's not acceptable.

I know age discrimination is common in many professions. It's not acceptable.

One question I have is why did he stay 10 years?

We'll agree to disagree. I've worked both as a salaried employee and a correspondent for newspapers for, well, my entire career (only five months as a correspondent — I left it when I got a full-time job with another paper, with benefits).

There is, in at least the newsrooms I've worked in, a vast distinction between what freelancers are and what full-time staffers are and what jobs they can and can't do.

If he spent the last 10 years ignoring the fact that the paper was laying off full-time staff left and right and expected to get hired on, then it was a mighty opaque set of blinders he had on.

There's an outside chance that the USA Today piece, which was AP was shot while he was at the Times, but Youth Today is a nationally distributed publication. I just searched that site and he had photo credits there for four years (2013-16).

He's a freelancer and not a staffer. But the judge will decide.

Link | Posted on Oct 23, 2017 at 19:30 UTC
In reply to:

Charley123: I don't think we can pick a side when we've only heard one side.

However, I have personally worked as a computer programmer and photographer. As a programmer I worked sometimes as employee and other times as contactor. They both have their,good and bad points. An objectionable situation occurred with one company that called me a subcontractor on the books, but treated me as a contactor when it benefited them, and treated me as an employee when it benefited them. That's not acceptable.

I know age discrimination is common in many professions. It's not acceptable.

One question I have is why did he stay 10 years?

No, the guy NEVER HAD A JOB with the New York Times. He was an independent contractor/freelancer who accepted assignments from the Times. He contracted with them for at least 14 years, the first two while working overseas and then 10 consecutive years (more or less) stateside. For what it's worth, I searched his name and Newsday and came up with this https://nwsdy.li/2z1VSd1 (in 2010 where a fellow photojournalist refers to him as a FREELANCER) as well as with USA Today in 2014 and came up with this: https://usat.ly/2yLVM83 which credits him along with AP ad this http://n.pr/2gx5sZP which ran on the NPR web in 2015 when he was shooting for "Youth Today."

He's done some nice stuff but as a freelancer — and didn't even freelance exclusively for the Times.

Link | Posted on Oct 23, 2017 at 15:29 UTC

It would be nice to see the contract he signed. I suspect there's nothing in it that either guarantees him work every day or obligates him to work for the Times every day.

Friends here in Florida who have worked as freelance photographers receive a day rate, with the understanding that they'll deliver X amount of photos. The Times called them to give them assignments. That is when they would have the parameters of when and where they had to be. Again, they're paid on a day rate.

Sometimes they'd say no because other gigs were booked.

Clearly the Times called Solarik regularly for work in the NYC area. I suspect they called him more frequently as they LAID OFF staff photographers -- a common practice in the past decade. Our photo staff went from 14 to 3.

I wish him well but I suspect there's no case here. Freelancers aren't guaranteed work.

Link | Posted on Oct 22, 2017 at 00:44 UTC as 14th comment
In reply to:

PHOTOJOE55: This camera would look nice on a mantle or shelf. Definitely a conversation piece.

This is one of those cameras that will sell to "collectors" after all it's already overfunded on Kickstarter. The only thing I can guarantee on the future is I'll be taking a pass on this.

Link | Posted on Oct 11, 2017 at 12:34 UTC
In reply to:

sirhawkeye64: I think this is a bad idea... there are many non-pros that would like a mirrorless from Nikon, but I'm assuming that a FF mirrorless will be costly to most (especially newbies and hobbyists and others who are doing photography for fun and not as a form of income). They need to rethink this strategy in my opinion. It's like they're abandoning perhaps 1/4 to 1/3 of their potential market. DSLRs will die off at some point (probably a long ways a way, 10-15 years yet) but if Nikon doesn't take the mirrorless market more seriously, they will be left behind. Hopefully this new mirrorless system, whatever it is from Nikon, can be like what the Macintosh or Apple II was for Apple (which the Mac technically replaced the Apple Lisa.... which was a bloated, overpriced machine that from what I know, never really worked right or even made it to market--or at least never gained any steam as a viable computer).

Chances are they'll do both. The're taking out patents for DX and FX lenses. Te D7000 DX and D600-Df-D750 series bodies were basically all variations of the same body.

Link | Posted on Sep 18, 2017 at 21:28 UTC

It's clearly a niche product. For Profoto shooters who want to work a speedlight into their kit. Hope it works but not something I'd look into personally.

Link | Posted on Sep 15, 2017 at 20:39 UTC as 24th comment
In reply to:

Karroly: A lot of marketing BS with one key parameter missing : the guide number.

The Elinchrom trigger is based on a Phottix one. The only reason to use the Elinchrom protocols is to attempt to integrate those two systems. Meanwhile, I've had great (flawless) luck with my HS triggers. Friends with Godox have (admittedly anecdotally) had worse luck.

Link | Posted on Sep 6, 2017 at 11:33 UTC
In reply to:

jhinkey: Any idea of the actual flash duration - 1/8000 sec shutter speed sync doesn't actually say how fast the actual duration is. Could not find it in their technical info section.

The PHOTONICZ ONE is vaporware, being marketed on Kickstarter. At least Rotolight has the larger Aerosmith that does exactly what the Neo2 does, this is a mini version of that.

Link | Posted on Sep 6, 2017 at 11:29 UTC
In reply to:

Nikonparrothead: It's the little brother to the Aeos. Both have been pushed hard by Jason Lanier. Though the Aeos doesn't use the Elinchrom. trigger system (yet). There are enough YouTube videos on the original Neo. I'm sure Lanier will post more on the Neo2.

I'm intrigued because it should in theory integrate with other Elinchrom gear. But I suspect it would be most useful off camera and close to the subject.

It may be underpowered for the needs of mavy on this thread but at least it's not vaporware like that Kickstarter project seeking funding for one big LED-based flash.

Probably not. Definitely not something to overpower the sun in daylight in an on camera mode. People interested in the unit will try it for themselves (I'd consider renting one or two for off-camera applications). Those who don't see the need will pass.

Link | Posted on Sep 6, 2017 at 11:25 UTC

It's the little brother to the Aeos. Both have been pushed hard by Jason Lanier. Though the Aeos doesn't use the Elinchrom. trigger system (yet). There are enough YouTube videos on the original Neo. I'm sure Lanier will post more on the Neo2.

I'm intrigued because it should in theory integrate with other Elinchrom gear. But I suspect it would be most useful off camera and close to the subject.

It may be underpowered for the needs of mavy on this thread but at least it's not vaporware like that Kickstarter project seeking funding for one big LED-based flash.

Link | Posted on Sep 6, 2017 at 01:43 UTC as 17th comment | 2 replies
Total: 68, showing: 1 – 20
« First‹ Previous1234Next ›Last »