DotCom Editor

Lives in United States New England, MA, United States
Works as a Technology journalist, editor, and author
Joined on Apr 4, 2005

Comments

Total: 277, showing: 1 – 20
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Let's see... Camera: $3,500. Ill-fitting orange L bracket from China: $45. Custom-fitted L bracket with clamp for strap boss from RRS: $185,

Yep, it definitely IS a no-brainer. I'll take the RRS product every time.

Link | Posted on Jul 14, 2017 at 17:52 UTC as 6th comment

My first cell phone was also a disposable camera — I lost it.

Link | Posted on Jul 14, 2017 at 17:45 UTC as 24th comment

I belong to the *other* PETA — People for the EDIBLE Treatment of Animals.

Link | Posted on Jul 14, 2017 at 17:44 UTC as 205th comment
In reply to:

DotCom Editor: No manufacturer is immune from recalls. Nikon, Canon, Takata airbags, and many more.

Canon issued multiple recalls for the "failure to focus" fiasco in the 1D Mark III.

Leica recalled the M9 for sensor woes.

Nikon had the oil-on-sensor woes with the D600. The company replacee cameras entirely with the D610.

Canon recalled models for discoloration of rubber grips.

Canon 5D cameras had mirrors simply fall off at the most-inconvenient times.

Fujufilm had a problem in 2005 with CCD sensors that led to captured images appearing completely black.

And let's not forget 1998, when Sony recalled 700,000 video cameras after customers found that the night vision, infrared technology designed for taking pictures in dark could, during daytime, see through clothing, revealing tattoos, underwear, and body parts.

Finally, even Rolls Royce is not immune. In November 2015, the luxury carmaker issued a recall — for ONE car.

So, Nikon screwed up? Sure. But, so does nearly everyone else.

And those Trent engines have dozens of sensors. Our cameras have but one.

Link | Posted on Jul 14, 2017 at 16:52 UTC

No manufacturer is immune from recalls. Nikon, Canon, Takata airbags, and many more.

Canon issued multiple recalls for the "failure to focus" fiasco in the 1D Mark III.

Leica recalled the M9 for sensor woes.

Nikon had the oil-on-sensor woes with the D600. The company replacee cameras entirely with the D610.

Canon recalled models for discoloration of rubber grips.

Canon 5D cameras had mirrors simply fall off at the most-inconvenient times.

Fujufilm had a problem in 2005 with CCD sensors that led to captured images appearing completely black.

And let's not forget 1998, when Sony recalled 700,000 video cameras after customers found that the night vision, infrared technology designed for taking pictures in dark could, during daytime, see through clothing, revealing tattoos, underwear, and body parts.

Finally, even Rolls Royce is not immune. In November 2015, the luxury carmaker issued a recall — for ONE car.

So, Nikon screwed up? Sure. But, so does nearly everyone else.

Link | Posted on Jul 14, 2017 at 00:25 UTC as 82nd comment | 6 replies

Ultimate imaging experience?

So sad that there will never be a need for any new camera, sensor, or photography website once the ultimate imaging experience is finally upon us. With no more technology improvements possible, imagine the tens of thousands of people at camera and software companies who will find themselves unemployed since "ultimate" is an end point, the final frontier. This is rather disheartening news, indeed.

Link | Posted on Jul 6, 2017 at 15:53 UTC as 33rd comment | 1 reply
On article Ask the staff: wedding season weirdness (273 comments in total)

I shot weddings throughout the 1970s while I was in college. Mamiya RB67 (the original, before the Pro S), and a Mamiya Universal press camera — both running 220 color print roll film. Metering was courtesy of a Gossen Luna Pro hanging around my neck. Flash done with a Braun RL 500 with 510-volt battery pack slung over my shoulder and a Honeywell Strobonar 770 "potato masher."

I didn't have the saccharin sweet persona that a wedding photog really needs to deal with astonishingly annoying and intrusive people. Playing psychologist and referee to battling family factions just wasn't my idea of a good time, consequently, I hated it. But, boy, the money was really, really good.

Link | Posted on Jul 3, 2017 at 03:41 UTC as 42nd comment | 3 replies
On article Caltech research team develops lensless camera (61 comments in total)
In reply to:

Franz Weber: Finally I can sell my unloved tele lenses

Embedded chip... How will Amazon or Google transform that into a profit center?

Link | Posted on Jun 23, 2017 at 20:56 UTC
On article Caltech research team develops lensless camera (61 comments in total)
In reply to:

Franz Weber: Finally I can sell my unloved tele lenses

Speaking of tele, the next thing after going lensless will be cameras with a telepathic user interface.

Link | Posted on Jun 22, 2017 at 21:59 UTC
In reply to:

Clyde Thomas: Dead pixel.

What? This website changed its name to Dead Pixel Review?

Link | Posted on Jun 22, 2017 at 21:57 UTC
In reply to:

Alex Efimoff: It funny how in the age of internet the same things are being rediscovered again and again every year.

It's like we say in journalism: "There are no new stories, only new reporters."

Link | Posted on Jun 16, 2017 at 01:47 UTC

Neat? Sure. Cool? Ok. Stunning? Ah, no.

Link | Posted on Jun 2, 2017 at 22:41 UTC as 17th comment | 3 replies
On article Google will no longer develop Nik Collection (390 comments in total)

On Sept. 17, 2012, when Google announced its acquisition of Nik Software, I reported the company was interested solely in the mobile Snapseed app and that the desktop-bound Nik suite was merely along for the ride. I expected Google would support the suite only until its underlying technology could be subsumed into other Google apps, initially Picasa, which it acquired in July 2004. In February 2016, Google killed off Picasa, elevating Google Photos to its sole photo platform.

After the Nik acquisition, Google cut the price from $500 USD to $149. In March 2016, it cut the price to zero, a clear sign the platform was closer to being jettisoned. Here we are, 14 months later, and that day has arrived.

The zero price appears to have had absolutely no negative impact on other fee-based third-party plug-in libraries from Topaz, On1, Alien Skin, Imagenomic, and DxO. At this point, there is little business case for Google to advance the Nik platform.

Link | Posted on May 30, 2017 at 22:45 UTC as 117th comment
On article Nikon D3: The camera that changed everything (283 comments in total)

The 1D3's autofocus woes were very real. Mine was sent back three times before Canon got it fixed properly and performed admirably. It is for that reason that I'll never again be in the first wave of adopters of any new camera body or lens.

Link | Posted on May 25, 2017 at 14:47 UTC as 93rd comment
In reply to:

Snapper2013: Dagnabit and I was just going to buy one of these cameras. 😢

And you made an enormously shrewd decision by not doing so! Congratulations.

Link | Posted on May 24, 2017 at 13:21 UTC

The 1D2 was far better than the follow-on 1D3, which suffered from one small inconvenience — a near-total inability to focus.

My 1D3 was returned three times under the recall until the geniuses at Canon finally got right.

Link | Posted on May 4, 2017 at 21:00 UTC as 59th comment
In reply to:

Najinsky: Just how bad is this Journalism. Did anyone reading this story get even the slightest clue about actually what the infringements are supposed to be. Specifically, what IP rights are being disputed?

On the surface Nikon's claims sound strong. As reported, ASML are acknowledging attempts to negotiate a license fee with Nikon, that seems to indicate that ASML acknowledge the need for license rights exist. But with so few relevant facts, trying to interpret the situation seems a crap shoot at best.

Time to search for better informed sites I guess.

Wretched writing.

Link | Posted on Apr 28, 2017 at 22:18 UTC
On article Sony a9 Full Review: Mirrorless Redefined (2724 comments in total)
In reply to:

DotCom Editor: "When I started shooting sports for college publications..."

And when I started shooting sports it was on a twin-lens reflex 6x6-cm camera with 120 roll film. There was no such thing as "frames per second." And no autofocus. And no through-the-lens metering. And no histogram. And no instant image review. And no tethering. And no blinkies. Today's "photographers," who are really just shutter-button-pushers would have absolutely no clue what to do if all those features were taken away.

Rev32, I wouldn't go back to the twin-lens reflex with hand crank film advance, either. I like my digitals with their high frame rates and tracking focus. But, you and I understand HOW to shoot without all that.

Link | Posted on Apr 27, 2017 at 19:14 UTC
On article Sony a9 Full Review: Mirrorless Redefined (2724 comments in total)
In reply to:

DotCom Editor: "When I started shooting sports for college publications..."

And when I started shooting sports it was on a twin-lens reflex 6x6-cm camera with 120 roll film. There was no such thing as "frames per second." And no autofocus. And no through-the-lens metering. And no histogram. And no instant image review. And no tethering. And no blinkies. Today's "photographers," who are really just shutter-button-pushers would have absolutely no clue what to do if all those features were taken away.

Riveredger, indeed, I feel good. In fact, I always feel good. You should feel good, too: I spared you the story of my college camera club that had a penchant for sending new members out to photograph (American) football with a Speed Graphic, a satchel full of 4x5-in sheet film magazines, a Gossen Luna Pro meter, and a darkroom stocked with HC-110 and Dektol.

PNad, I don't ride horses. They smell.

Famous photographer Tony Corbell has it right: He sometimes requires his workshop students to cover over the LCD display on their cameras. Thus, they are forced to actually LEARN about exposure.

Link | Posted on Apr 23, 2017 at 16:32 UTC
On article Sony a9 Full Review: Mirrorless Redefined (2724 comments in total)

"When I started shooting sports for college publications..."

And when I started shooting sports it was on a twin-lens reflex 6x6-cm camera with 120 roll film. There was no such thing as "frames per second." And no autofocus. And no through-the-lens metering. And no histogram. And no instant image review. And no tethering. And no blinkies. Today's "photographers," who are really just shutter-button-pushers would have absolutely no clue what to do if all those features were taken away.

Link | Posted on Apr 23, 2017 at 12:49 UTC as 458th comment | 29 replies
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