ET2

Lives in United States United States
Joined on Aug 25, 2010

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Total: 1130, showing: 1 – 20
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In reply to:

eazizisaid: Admirable !

Bravo to Fujifilm, Sony, Olympus, Leica & Hasselblad ! The clear leaders of tomorrow camera market !!

IdM photography, yes there is a reason why A99 has mirror, and the reason is that old DSLR lenses are not optimized for CDAF. The new mirrorless lenses perform fine on their native mount as these lenses were designed to AF fast without mirror.

Link | Posted on Sep 21, 2016 at 21:58 UTC
In reply to:

eazizisaid: Admirable !

Bravo to Fujifilm, Sony, Olympus, Leica & Hasselblad ! The clear leaders of tomorrow camera market !!

Mirrorless cameras focus far more accurately if you don't care about continuous AF, as they focus via main sensor which means they don't suffer from back and front focus issues like DSLRs

Link | Posted on Sep 21, 2016 at 21:16 UTC
In reply to:

eazizisaid: Admirable !

Bravo to Fujifilm, Sony, Olympus, Leica & Hasselblad ! The clear leaders of tomorrow camera market !!

Most mirrorless cameras released in 2016 have better AF tracking than Pentx cameras. Read K1 review

Link | Posted on Sep 21, 2016 at 16:57 UTC
In reply to:

eazizisaid: Admirable !

Bravo to Fujifilm, Sony, Olympus, Leica & Hasselblad ! The clear leaders of tomorrow camera market !!

Pixel shift is not unique. Both Olympus and Hasselblad had pixel shifting before Pentax. And it's not even very convincing implementation as it doesn't work without tripod and for any scene that isn't completely still.

Link | Posted on Sep 21, 2016 at 16:55 UTC
In reply to:

howardfuhrman: Is there a market for the a99 II since nearly all the promotion to date has focused on the A7Rii? What advantages does the a99 II have over the A7RII?

Interestingness, do you realize that dozens of different people post comment here? Some like smaller size cameras. They were posting cons of 5D IV as it's too large for them. Now DIFFERENT people are posting reasons why they like A99, as they like bigger cameras. Are you really this stupid to not understand that?

Link | Posted on Sep 20, 2016 at 04:51 UTC
In reply to:

howardfuhrman: Is there a market for the a99 II since nearly all the promotion to date has focused on the A7Rii? What advantages does the a99 II have over the A7RII?

larger size, battery, PDAF AF with mirror, and tons of A-mount lenses. Also there are diehard Amount users who needed an upgrade for A99

Link | Posted on Sep 19, 2016 at 15:29 UTC
In reply to:

Light Pilgrim: Why Apple calls it waterproof if they will not replace a water damaged phone?

The phone can withstand 30 minutes immersion in 1 meter deep water. That's waterproof. It's not just splash proof.

Link | Posted on Sep 11, 2016 at 15:02 UTC
In reply to:

Light Pilgrim: Why Apple calls it waterproof if they will not replace a water damaged phone?

Teila Day Iphone7 is rated as IP67, which means

6 Totally protected against dust
7 Protected against the effect of immersion between 15cm and 1m

Link | Posted on Sep 10, 2016 at 18:43 UTC
In reply to:

Light Pilgrim: Why Apple calls it waterproof if they will not replace a water damaged phone?

This is same for various other companies. Even if the phones are waterproof (and IPhone 7 is), companies always have disclaimer that they will not cover water damage. It was same disclaimer by Sony for Sony phones, even though those phone were advertised as waterproof too.

Link | Posted on Sep 10, 2016 at 14:57 UTC
On article Sony offers E PZ 18-110mm F4 G OSS for Super 35mm/APS-C (128 comments in total)
In reply to:

NDT0001: This is a great lens for e mount camcorders like the fs7 and fs5. This should have been what Sony originally released instead of the 28-135 which was nowhere near wide enough for doco style applications. Well done Sony.

FS7 ad FS5 aren't FF.

Link | Posted on Sep 9, 2016 at 09:38 UTC
On article Apple unveils iPhone 7 and dual-cam iPhone 7 Plus (946 comments in total)
In reply to:

Manbungo Skumbaum Chimwala: Wow, the iPhone 7 is shaping up to be every bit the DSLR killer it was rumored to be! Looks like there will soon be a second mass extinction of dinosaurs shortly...

iPhone is a mirrorless killer? LOL. DSLR will die long before that happens

Link | Posted on Sep 8, 2016 at 04:41 UTC
In reply to:

pagou: so now private companies have my fingerprint, and i pay for that?

Speaking of passwords, you cannot recovered a "hashed" password if the password was strong. i.e randomly generated 10 to 11 alphanumeric password would have 64 bits of entropy. The largest successful brute force attack ever was against 64 bits by distributed.net. It took 331,252 computers over 1,757 days to do it ( a lot of money, which I doubt anyone attacking a random joe would want to spend). Since then distributed.net.have moved to cracking 72 bits (256 times stronger than 64 bits) but they haven't yet done it, after 14 years of trying.

http://www.distributed.net/RC5

If password was randomly generated and had 14 alphanumeric characters, that's 83 bits of entropy. Even US govt, Amazon, Google, combined will have to spend serious amount of money to crack such a password, and would take serious time and effort.

Any password stronger than that would be beyond humanity's reach, unless SHA2 hashing algorithm is broken, which I think is unlikely to happen.

Link | Posted on Sep 3, 2016 at 17:27 UTC
In reply to:

pagou: so now private companies have my fingerprint, and i pay for that?

Of course you can crack "weak" hashed passwords a users tend to choose predictable passwords and you can precompute hashes and create lookup tables. That's why most sites will add "salt" to the passwords as counter to precomputed tables. A weak password would be still cracked , despite the salt, but keep in mind you are not breaking the hashing algorithm (like SHA2, md5 is broken and is irrelevant, no one uses it), but you are breaking the password by trying a few billion known passwords in your database.

None of this applies to fingerprint hashes as fingerprints are not like passwords. They are unique.

If the password itself is 128 bits, (not a weak predictable password like human tend to create), there is no way you can "crack" it as, the amount of energy required is more than produced by the US in an year.

See theoretical limits on brute force

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brute-force_attack#Theoretical_limits

Link | Posted on Sep 3, 2016 at 07:18 UTC
In reply to:

pagou: so now private companies have my fingerprint, and i pay for that?

md5 can't be cracked because it's 128 bits. It's cracked because algorithm was broken years ago. Same was true for SHA1 8 years ago, but as it turned out, none of these attacks worked on SHA2. That's why even though we now has SHA3, which is completely different design than SHA2, SHA2 is still used and recommended. If you could break SHA2, you would be a millionaire anyway, as you could steal all the bitcoins.
And "salt and pepper"? LOL. You are confusing salt, which is added to user passwords, to protect passwords from precomputed lookup tables, as users tend to use weak passwords, with something . "salt and pepper" .. yeah, right.

You don't have any clue on this topic. Take a basic high school class on crypto.

Link | Posted on Sep 3, 2016 at 06:46 UTC
In reply to:

pagou: so now private companies have my fingerprint, and i pay for that?

crashpc, you don't know what you are babbling about, really. The standard crypto algorithms (regardless if it's hash, or encryption) cannot be broken and has not been broken for past 20 years (AES is 16 years old).

The systems are always broken either because of the user error (weak passwords), implementation error (bugs in software), or some other means (like social engineering), but both SHA2 and AES (the most standard hashing and encryption algorithms used by everyone, google, apple, banks, etc) haven't been broken in last 20 years, and there is no reason to believe they will be broken in next 100 years, not even with quantum computers.

As for rainbow table, again you have confused knowledge about the topic. The amount of disk space required to create rainbow tables for something like 128 bits would require earth size hard disk.

Link | Posted on Sep 2, 2016 at 19:42 UTC
In reply to:

pagou: so now private companies have my fingerprint, and i pay for that?

Mister Joseph, SHA2 is open algorithm that has been studied for past 20 years by bazillions of students and mathematicians. It does not have a "secret" or "unknown" constants (like some NSA random number generator that were always suspect anyway).

There is absolutely no reason to believe NSA has a "secret" for SHA2 even when rest of humanity (brilliant people working for google, chinese, japanese, Indians) can't see it.

It's publicly known algorithm --- not some secret known only to NSA.

Link | Posted on Sep 2, 2016 at 19:22 UTC
In reply to:

pagou: so now private companies have my fingerprint, and i pay for that?

https://crypto.stackexchange.com/questions/1145/how-much-would-it-cost-in-u-s-dollars-to-brute-force-a-256-bit-key-in-a-year

"Given that k=1.38⋅10−16erg/∘Kelvink=1.38⋅10−16erg/∘Kelvin, and that the ambient temperature of the universe is 3.2∘K3.2∘K, an ideal computer running at 3.2∘K3.2∘K would consume 4.4⋅10−164.4⋅10−16 ergs every time it set or cleared a bit. To run a computer any colder than the cosmic background radiation would require extra energy to run a heat pump.

Now, the annual energy output of our sun is about 1.21⋅10411.21⋅1041 ergs. This is enough to power about 2.7⋅10562.7⋅1056 single bit changes on our ideal computer; enough state changes to put a 187-bit counter through all its values. If we built a Dyson sphere around the sun and captured all of its energy for 32 years, without any loss, we could power a computer to count up to 2^192. Of course, it wouldn’t have the energy left over to perform any useful calculations with this counter."

Link | Posted on Sep 2, 2016 at 19:19 UTC
In reply to:

pagou: so now private companies have my fingerprint, and i pay for that?

That's idiotic statement. A hash cannot be broken by brute force as the amount of energy required to go through 256 bits is more than sun will produced in 8 billion years. In fact it's more energy than produced by supernova.

Of course a "hash" can be broken if there is some mathematical flaw in the hashing algorithm that weakens it, but there is no known weakness in hashing algorithms that are standard today (like SHA2/3, etc) -- even though thousands of mathematicians/student study them every day in school.

Link | Posted on Sep 2, 2016 at 19:11 UTC
In reply to:

pagou: so now private companies have my fingerprint, and i pay for that?

No, they don't. The data from fingerprint is hashed so actual fingerprint is lost in hashing, and that hash doesn't leave your phone anyway.

Link | Posted on Sep 2, 2016 at 17:38 UTC
On article Canon announces new flagship EOS C700 cinema camera (169 comments in total)
In reply to:

zzapamiga: Looks like a beast of a camera with RAW recording and the option of a global shutter. I wonder if any Hollywood movies will use this camera? The global shutter would be great for fast moving action scenes. Hopefully this technology will eventually filter down into consumer cameras with a global shutter.

I am not a clueless "troll", moron. I know personally many cinematographers. Yes, I know C300 was used for need for speed. You think I don't know that? LOL. I was around when Shane Hurlbut was testing cameras for Need for Speed.

This doesn't change anything what I said above. . Arri rules Hollywood for digital Completely. You can look up on shotonwhat.com to verify that. Red and Sony are way behind in Hollywood (though Sony at least dominates news/broadcast industry, which isn't Hollywood). Film cameras are still used most in Hollywood. Canon is a joke and way behind in Hollywood. C700 isn't going to change that reality.

Link | Posted on Sep 2, 2016 at 14:32 UTC
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