ottonis

Lives in Germany Germany
Joined on Dec 16, 2011

Comments

Total: 273, showing: 21 – 40
« First‹ Previous12345Next ›Last »
On article The Canon EOS R6 is the R5 for the masses (157 comments in total)

The R6 is absolutely impressive - and this is coming from a Sony fan.
It ticks all the bells and whistles: with its dual super-fast memory card slots, audio connectors, stunning in-body stabilization and up-to-date video specs, this looks like a 2020-version of the Sony A7iii.

So, assuming a price drop within 12-24 months by 10-20%, this is going to be camera I will be looking for - except that Sony is going to counter dollar-for-dollar with an improved future A7iv.

These are very exciting times....

Link | Posted on Jul 10, 2020 at 08:33 UTC as 10th comment
On article Canon EOS R5 initial review (1799 comments in total)

So, this one being a new high-end segment camera, the only true drawback I can see is the pathetic battery life (CIPA rating: 320 shots). All other specs are just awesome, in particular the video specs.

That being said, it will be interesting how Sony is going to counter in that segment. Sony would have to combine the whopping speed of the A9 series with the high-resolution of the A7r series with the video capabilities of a future A7s3 in order to compete with this R5.
Competition is always a great thing. Sony was at its best when they started as an underdog and ultimately revolutionized the market with ther APSC (Nex / A6x00) and FF (A7x) MILC cameras.
I remember an interview that dpreview staff had with a Sony CEO years ago, stating that they had introduced a 6-months- innovation cycle.

Now Canon have outpaced them, apparently - the R5 being a case in point. So, this will hopefully further increase the innovation pace at Sony and other brands - which is so good for everybody!

Link | Posted on Jul 10, 2020 at 06:29 UTC as 181st comment | 3 replies

Well, at two and a half grand, the R6 is ca. 20% above A7iii price levels. And anticipating potential price drops to <2k USD, there is no doubt, the 2 and a half year old A7iii will get those discounts just as well, keeping the price gap.

Technically, the most distinctive advantage of the R6 over the A7iii is in the video specs and some ergonomic features like the flip-screen.

Now, the A7-series approaching their 3 year production cycle, we can anticipate a brand new A7 mark 4 / A7iv within the next 6-9 months.
And that's where things are going to get very interesting: extrapolating from Sony's track record over the past 7-8 years, it's very likely that an upcoming A7iv will at least be competitive with regards to specs, same/similar while offering a couple of distinctive advantages - at a similar price as the R6 MRSP.

So, these are great times, and I truly hope the sub 2k FF MILC segment will have some great competition going on.

Link | Posted on Jul 10, 2020 at 06:03 UTC as 199th comment
In reply to:

ottonis: The original A7s was a disruptive technology in its time: it offered absolutely unprecedented and unparalleled low-light-video-capabilities in a package that was tuned to "see in the dark". The A7s Sony was several years in advance of its competition. I remember a short film by Philp Bloom that revealed stunning footage at night that he recorded with the A7s. That was a revelation back in the day.

Now, I fully understand why Sony took so long to reveal a worthy successor to the A7s/A7sii: Apperently the "7s"-series has to keep bringing disruptive video-centric technologies to the market.

Understandably, I am more than curious, what the A7siii (or whatever it's named) will actually bring to the table and in how far it will actually "exceed the expectations", as Mr. Takeda insinuated. The problem is, that the expectations are astronomically high, people expect the next "7s" to leave the competition in the dust - one more time.

So, spotlights are on - Sony, it's your show now!

@ZV-1: The A6000 was a legendary camera at its time of introduction and at the pricepoint. The following iterations (A6400, A6500) and later on the A6300/A6600 have each brought some evolutionary improvements but nothing really groundbreaking.
The reason for this is that Sony most likely tried to prevent its FF line from cannibalization. If the APSC-cameras are "too good", less people would get into the FF segment, so less money for Sony.
That's why we have seen virtually the same sensor since the A6300 (very similar DR, IQ).
Of course, a "legit" A7000 - a worthy successor to the legendary NEX 7 camera, would be awesome, especially if it would bring along a significant bump in sensor performance, maybe some computational imaging and camera ergonomics.

Link | Posted on Jul 2, 2020 at 06:39 UTC
In reply to:

King Penguin: When I see posts like this I think ‘Oh I’m so glad I migrated to a Leica M10 and a few nice Leica & Voigtlander primes’ (15mm, 21mm, 35mm, 50mm & 75mm)

Such a simple and intuitive camera to operate.......now I concentrate on light, shadow and composition, which is the real joy of photography instead of being amazed by the latest plastic gizmo or gadget.......

@lawny13
Quote "How many sony users out there feel completely disappointed when they didn't nail the setting to get the lowest ISO possible to squeeze out all the DR they can?"

The main point here is that Sony has massively advanced the mirrorless camera market in the last 10 years, starting with the Nex 3 and Nex 5 APSC MILCs, the first FF MILCs (A7, A/r), the first FF MILCs with IBIS and the legendary A7s, which could literally "see in the dark".
All of these have been truly disruptive technological events that changed the entire camera market.

That doesn't mean that Sony did everything right and everything perfect. And Sony got some "beating" for it, e.g. its subotimal JPEG color science - which they thankfully massively improved in the last couple of years. Or their menu logic. And we could go on with many imperfect details, some of which may have been deal breakers for some people. But Sony really innovated and now we are expecting nothing less than a new disruptive camera.

Link | Posted on Jul 2, 2020 at 06:32 UTC
In reply to:

Full Stop: With the SONY IMX521 sensor this cam could
do in 4K what the GH5s (with IMX294) does in FHD.
Lower resolution for more sensitivity (night) OR
higher DR (daylight).
For stills this thing could have 16 stops of DR in one shot.

Not to mention that it may have vastly improved (reduced) rolling shutter.

Link | Posted on Jun 30, 2020 at 14:31 UTC
In reply to:

ottonis: The original A7s was a disruptive technology in its time: it offered absolutely unprecedented and unparalleled low-light-video-capabilities in a package that was tuned to "see in the dark". The A7s Sony was several years in advance of its competition. I remember a short film by Philp Bloom that revealed stunning footage at night that he recorded with the A7s. That was a revelation back in the day.

Now, I fully understand why Sony took so long to reveal a worthy successor to the A7s/A7sii: Apperently the "7s"-series has to keep bringing disruptive video-centric technologies to the market.

Understandably, I am more than curious, what the A7siii (or whatever it's named) will actually bring to the table and in how far it will actually "exceed the expectations", as Mr. Takeda insinuated. The problem is, that the expectations are astronomically high, people expect the next "7s" to leave the competition in the dust - one more time.

So, spotlights are on - Sony, it's your show now!

@ZV-1 Not sure if serious, since no a7000 has been announced as yet. I guess you are being sarcastic?
Anyways, if you don't like Sony hardware, you might as well get another videocentrc high-end camera utilizing the same sensor, as the famous IMX 521 that is rumored to be in the A7sii successor is said to also be available for 3rd party cameras - so maybe a future Panasonic or NIkon Camera may utilize this same sensor as well.

Link | Posted on Jun 30, 2020 at 14:30 UTC
In reply to:

King Penguin: When I see posts like this I think ‘Oh I’m so glad I migrated to a Leica M10 and a few nice Leica & Voigtlander primes’ (15mm, 21mm, 35mm, 50mm & 75mm)

Such a simple and intuitive camera to operate.......now I concentrate on light, shadow and composition, which is the real joy of photography instead of being amazed by the latest plastic gizmo or gadget.......

The Sony A7s-successor will obviously be a videocentric camera. I guess the Leica M10 is not the best choice for videos, but if you are into stills photography, the M10 is certainly a great camera.

Link | Posted on Jun 30, 2020 at 11:50 UTC

The original A7s was a disruptive technology in its time: it offered absolutely unprecedented and unparalleled low-light-video-capabilities in a package that was tuned to "see in the dark". The A7s Sony was several years in advance of its competition. I remember a short film by Philp Bloom that revealed stunning footage at night that he recorded with the A7s. That was a revelation back in the day.

Now, I fully understand why Sony took so long to reveal a worthy successor to the A7s/A7sii: Apperently the "7s"-series has to keep bringing disruptive video-centric technologies to the market.

Understandably, I am more than curious, what the A7siii (or whatever it's named) will actually bring to the table and in how far it will actually "exceed the expectations", as Mr. Takeda insinuated. The problem is, that the expectations are astronomically high, people expect the next "7s" to leave the competition in the dust - one more time.

So, spotlights are on - Sony, it's your show now!

Link | Posted on Jun 30, 2020 at 11:22 UTC as 56th comment | 9 replies

DP Review articles that changed my life: Article about "Camera Lucida" by Barney Britton.
This is seriously one of the most fascinating photography-centric articles I have ever read.
Thanks a lot, Barney!

Link | Posted on Apr 20, 2020 at 18:27 UTC as 16th comment | 1 reply

What a joke of sn announcement. According to some tech sites that have covered that announcement, Intel has shown off the performance gains of its 10th Gen CPUs by comparing them with 3 year old technology (spoiler alert the 2020 CPUs were faster than the CPUs from 2017).

Intel's main problem is efficiency. These "45 W TDP" CPUs are meant to draw a multitude of 45W over certain amounts of time if the CPU is kept cool by the thermals. So, in adequately cooled notebooks, these CPUs will be real energy hogs - absolutely no contest with AMDs super energy efficient 4000 Ryzen parts.

Intel's 10th gen CPUs are already outdated technologically. Only die-hard fan boys or limited availability of AMDs 4000 might cause anybody to deliberately choose Intel in 2020.

Link | Posted on Apr 5, 2020 at 22:08 UTC as 3rd comment
In reply to:

Einride: Incredible how DPR rushes out to do a re-test of the Sony. Why didn’t you do a re-test of the Nikon Z6 when Jordan said it’s preamps were bad? Or why not re-test the XT3 with more microphones.

Let’s do some reliability tests too. Let’s test the A7iii sealing against Canon and Nikon. Let’s test the A7iii resistance against overheating vs the other brands. And yeah, let’s test its IBIS too while we’re at it compared with the Z6.

They didn't "rush" to re-test but were obviously nudged so by other users and professionals as well who obviously did have vastly different experiences with the Sony A7iii audio quality.

It was even more important to re-test the Sony because it was light-years behind the competition in their first test comparison video, those results seemed to reflect some sort of abnormality or technical issue rather than the true capability of the Sony A7iii audio preamps.

Link | Posted on Apr 5, 2020 at 14:22 UTC

Beside those issues, the image and video quality of the S20ultra seems to be quite underwhelming. GsmArena.com did a fairly comprehensive camera review as well as a camera comparison with the iPhone 11 and the Huawei Mate Pro 3. According to those samples, there is barely any area where the s20 ultra surpasses its peers.
The UWA is also a fixed focal length, without AF, which limits its use, for example in close up scenarios or for macro.

The camera phone that seems to be much more interesting and promising than the s20 ultra might be the Sony Xperia 1 mark 2, with a much more "professional" appearance and quite some computational features borrowed from the Sony A9.
In contrast to Samsung, Sony is sticking with 12 Megapixel sensors, which will considerably offload computational burden from the processing hardware and reduce the amount of data that needs to be shuffled around, while keeping resources for ultrafast eye autofocus and image stabilization, among others.

Link | Posted on Mar 1, 2020 at 22:11 UTC as 55th comment | 6 replies
In reply to:

jhunna: Quite seriously the only thing that might keep me from buying the Fuji X100V.

With regards to focal lenghts: I have always felt that the 24 mm main lens is just too wide - especially, if there is a UWA lens on board (16 mm or less) as well.
If it was me to design a triple camera, it would be 16 mm, 35 mm and 80 mm.

Link | Posted on Feb 25, 2020 at 13:30 UTC
In reply to:

BenRut: Very, very tempting as a smartphone. The dedicated shutter button is nice on the Sonys. However the main concern for me as a CAMERA is battery life (both on a day to day basis and also the fact it is not replaceable) and also cost. Spending what is now getting on for $1000 on a smartphone every couple of years is a seriously expensive way to take photos that are 'nearly' as good as a camera.

@yayatosorus: I have Mate 20 Pro with an 4000 mAh battery and the battery capacity has shrunken considerably within the past 14 months of possession. In the beginning, the battery lasted 2 full days of use. Nowadays, I charge it in the morning before worl and have to recharge the phone in the afternoon or early evening.

Link | Posted on Feb 25, 2020 at 13:27 UTC
In reply to:

pseudobreccia: The guy that wrote this article is an uninformed idiot. The X100S is not the "original" in this series of cameras...it was the X100. If he can't even get that right...why continue reading the rest of the article, undoubtedly filled to the brim with ignorance.

Oh boy, you surely want to apologize, don't you?

Link | Posted on Feb 8, 2020 at 16:35 UTC
In reply to:

SilvanBromide: "If that's not a best-of-the-decade-worthy camera then we don't know what is."

How patently ridiculous to say that about the camera that you're relegating to second place and therefore conspicuously *not* awarding "best-of-decade" status, and then on the very next slide announce what you obviously already knew *is* the best-of-decade-worthy camera.

With all due respect, but this entire vote was NOT about the best camera at all, but about the camera that had the most influence on the camera industry and development.

Link | Posted on Jan 5, 2020 at 17:50 UTC

I agree with the vote. Without the Sony A7/r Nikon and Canon wouldn't have moved from mirror to mirror less, so the A7/r had an impact that ultimately led to a paradigm shift in the camera industry.
And that's why it is the most important camera. Of course there were faster and more capable and more ergonomical cameras, but none of them had that impact on the entire market.
That's what is often called a "disruptive" technology.

Link | Posted on Jan 5, 2020 at 17:48 UTC as 60th comment | 9 replies
In reply to:

Mariano Pacifico: Readers stick to only one camera brand. That is a given.
They do not go on location with dizzying number of camera brands and with equally confusing numbers of lenses. Having said that. They obviously will choose whatever they have existing camera systems they currently own as the best gear.

I have a Panasonic Lumix and two Sonly E-mount cameras, as well as (adapted) Canon FDn, Sigma, Voigtländer, Sony and Samyang glass.
I even still have an old Canon Powershot camera (from 2005) in my cabinet.

Now, that's quite a brands, ain't it?

I think that many people do have more gear from more than one brand in their possession.
And while I do not possess a Sony A7iv, I still voted voted for it as gear of the year, because of the significant advantages it offers over its competitors.

Link | Posted on Dec 29, 2019 at 18:23 UTC
In reply to:

music4ever: Yes, its rendering is much better than Sigma. Very carved. But the camera is something completly unspecial. The colors are basic and not eye-catching. far from Nikon and further from Canon

@music4ever
There is consensus that Sony JPG color science has catched up with Nikon/Canon.
If you are shooting Raw, then the colors are up to you and your Raw Editing software of choice, anywhere.

Link | Posted on Dec 26, 2019 at 08:41 UTC
Total: 273, showing: 21 – 40
« First‹ Previous12345Next ›Last »