ottonis

Lives in Germany Germany
Joined on Dec 16, 2011

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Total: 276, showing: 1 – 20
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On article Sony ZV-1 review (268 comments in total)
In reply to:

RMS1986: I wanted to change my rx100m5 on this one, just because of the audio. I think in photos, the quality would be a little better, in addition to the updated focus.

Recently, there was a video-review on this camera on Youtube where they compared the ZV1 to two other cameras and the built-in camera mic quality was really nothing to write home about - in my opinion. That's not what they said but the video let you listen to the original audio and I really didn't like it.
But I am an audio connoisseur and quite picky, so your mileage may vary.

Link | Posted on Sep 23, 2020 at 18:52 UTC

It's important to understand that there is A) a large market for "average Joe" / casual photographers /"hockey moms" and B) a narrow/niche market for photography nerds, enthusiast amateurs and pros.

The large market used to be occupied by Kodak instant cameras, later on up from the early 2000s by compact pocketable digicams such as Digital Ixus and similar models. Up from ca. 2012 the camera phone segment has started a huge race against the largest part of phography market: the pocket digicams and the lower end of the system camera segment.
So, the only way for camera makers to survive is to give up on cheap cameras and focus on niche market of expensive FF models. If they cannot sell enough of their A9, A7riv, A7siii cameras there (Brazil) they don't see any reason to stay there.

Link | Posted on Sep 19, 2020 at 20:22 UTC as 39th comment | 11 replies
On article DPReview TV: Sony a7C review (414 comments in total)
In reply to:

John Gellings: Apparently, Sony cameras are for spec chasers. While I understand the disappointment by some, to act like this camera is not capable of great photographs is the silliest thing I’ve heard in awhile.

@Handsome:
You quoted my post to demonstrate how some commenters allege the Sony A7c may not be able to take great photographers (as proposed by the OP).

However, that's a gross misrepresentation of my post! I only said that some technical aspects of the A7c are outdated and thus may not justify the price tag of 2000 bucks.
Of course the A7c is more than capable of taking phantastic photos - just as many other cameras - no questions about that.
I questioned, whether its advantage in size actually justifies its relatively high price compared to competing models from the same as well as other brands.

Link | Posted on Sep 19, 2020 at 20:04 UTC
On article DPReview TV: Sony a7C review (414 comments in total)

I like the form factor and the amazing AF, but everything else, starting with the sensor, the atrocious rolling shutter, the subpar IBIS, the menu system, the 8 bit video Codecs, the dysfunctional touchscreen functionality and the small-ish VF is just a little bit outdated in order to make this camera worth the 2000 bucks it is asking for.

All these cuttings would be more than acceptable if Sony charged e.g. only 1300 USD for it.

And I am saying this as a long time Sony user (Nex5n and A7ii) and Sony aficionado.

Link | Posted on Sep 18, 2020 at 21:21 UTC as 41st comment | 6 replies
In reply to:

bayindirh: There's no need to react like every A7/A9 camera is discontinued and will be forcibly removed from owners' homes starting tonight.

It's a new, compact A7. It may not be everyone's cup of tea but, it's small. It might not fill everyone's needs but it doesn't have to.

It's an experiment on smallest FF body. Why not let a company to try and fail? Failure is a better teacher than success albeit a harsher one.

I applaud Sony for trying to find its limits. It's good. Sony is not untouchable. They can make mistakes. Let them be. They're successful because they made stubborn mistakes in the past (MD design choices, Memory Stick, refusing to support MP3, DRM love, etc.) and, they've learned from it well.

Let them experiment and learn.

Moreover: Camera market is shrinking, everyone needs experiments in today's market.

Very well said!

Link | Posted on Sep 15, 2020 at 20:37 UTC
On article Fujifilm XF 50mm F1.0 pre-production sample gallery (246 comments in total)
In reply to:

whitelens: Picture #43:
The grill of the Ford pick up has massive purple outlines.
The windshield wiper and the mirror bracket have massive green outlines.
I would not be happy with this lens!

@goodbokeh: "The 50/1.0 is designed to be used with in-camera or software correction for purple/green fringing (chromatic aberrations)."

You are certainly right, but it's still a weakness and not a feature. Any kind of "corrections" needed to be done in post-processing because the lens didn't do it right in the first place, will reduce some aspect of quality; it's not a "lossless" process: be it chromatic aberrations, geometrical distortion or extreme vignetting.

Link | Posted on Sep 5, 2020 at 10:24 UTC
In reply to:

silentstorm: After reading this, my geekiness kicks in.

I would very much like to buy a R5 and mod the heatsink inside. Remove the existing heatsink, measure its dimension, get a small workshop to duplicate the heatsink in pure copper, then use high quality thermal grease like the Artic MX4 to fix it up.

I wonder would that improve the thermal limitations? Sounds crazy but fun!

If it only were that easy!
Just a copper heatsink and great thermal past won't help if the heat cannot leave the camera body. You would have to drill quite a few big holes into the camera body in order to dissipate that heat from the inside to the outside.

Link | Posted on Aug 4, 2020 at 11:15 UTC
In reply to:

Jones Indiana: "It should be noted that Canon did not design either the EOS R5 or R6 to be professional video tools, nor does it primarily market them as such"

Not being marketed as such???

From the Canon page:

"Canon EOS R5 - A professional full frame mirrorless flagship camera offering photographers and filmmakers high resolution stills and 8K video."

https://www.canon-europe.com/cameras/eos-r-system/#Products

and...

"Setting new standards for filmmakers… all over again"

https://www.canon-europe.com/cameras/eos-r5/

So these days flagship cameras are aimed towards amateur users?
Well then this amateur aimed 'flagship camera' is then certainly being sold at a 'Pro' price level.

Very true! It was certainly Canon's misleading marketing of the R5 that is now backfiring and causing quite a disappointment or even outrage at those who expected a camera with revolutionary video.
If Canon had been honest, they would have advertised the R5 as a great stills camera that does line-skipped 4k video - and some extra video gadgets (4khq/8k) that are fine for occasionally shooting very short clips or just goofing around.

Link | Posted on Aug 4, 2020 at 10:02 UTC
In reply to:

ottonis: Much ado about nothing. There is no doubt that both The R5 and the R6 are fantastic cameras at their respective price-segments.
The main mistake or misconception was that the R5 got wrongly perceived as a pro camera for stills and video.
Now, it turns out that it can reliably shoot only line-skipped 4k and that any higher quality or resolution are "nice to have gadgets" but not really usable for any serious work.
I am not sure the 10bit 4:2:2 internal recording can make up for the line skipping, so all in all, from the perspective of practical *usability*, R5's video capabilities are roughly at the same ballpark as those of the Sony, A7r4. Sure, the R5 can do 8K and all that good stuff, but that's not practically usable except for playing around.

That being said, the R5 is still a fantastic camera, it's just not what some people wanted it to be: a do-it-all, jack of all trades, hell of a chap camera

That's absolutely true. Canon's marketing boldly claiming revolutionary video capabilities was just too bold and certainly misleading.

Link | Posted on Aug 4, 2020 at 09:54 UTC
In reply to:

Thoughts R Us: It's clear that the idea of a hybrid that can do it all is dead. The market is more specialized than in the 5DII days. Most pro's and enthusiasts specialize in either stills or video; few do both well. Any new product is judged by the extreme standards of both and social media amplifies the criticisms.

If I were Canon I would do what Panasonic did with the S1H and produce an entirely video centric version of this. Call it the R5V. Then segment going forward; that's what the market wants apparently. Release stills cameras with only ordinary video features. Release a video centric device with specialized features for that market. Then the photo people have what they want and the video people have what they want.

The market has split; there are no generalists out there. The people I know that do stills do not do much video at all, if any. The people I know that do video only do video; the most they do is take BTS shots of their video work.

Quote: "It's clear that the idea of a hybrid that can do it all is dead."

That's certainly not true at all. The true problem is that technology has not advanced as far as some people imagined it to be.

There is a triangle between body size, processing demands and processing efficiency.

Make a camera body large enough to fit a large heatsink and maybe an active fan, then you might be able to record 8k at high bit rates, 10 bit etc with no time constraints.

If you decide to keep the camera body too small in order to implement sufficient cooling, then you get an R5: it can record 8k but not long enough for any serious work.

If you decide to keep a camera body small then you gotta cut down on specs (no 8k), such as in the Sony A7siii.

Now, in perhaps in a couple of years, when 5nm or even 3 nm process nodes will have been established, the processing efficiency of CPUs will probably have improved so much allowing for 8k recording without the CPU breaking a sweat.

Link | Posted on Aug 4, 2020 at 06:43 UTC

Much ado about nothing. There is no doubt that both The R5 and the R6 are fantastic cameras at their respective price-segments.
The main mistake or misconception was that the R5 got wrongly perceived as a pro camera for stills and video.
Now, it turns out that it can reliably shoot only line-skipped 4k and that any higher quality or resolution are "nice to have gadgets" but not really usable for any serious work.
I am not sure the 10bit 4:2:2 internal recording can make up for the line skipping, so all in all, from the perspective of practical *usability*, R5's video capabilities are roughly at the same ballpark as those of the Sony, A7r4. Sure, the R5 can do 8K and all that good stuff, but that's not practically usable except for playing around.

That being said, the R5 is still a fantastic camera, it's just not what some people wanted it to be: a do-it-all, jack of all trades, hell of a chap camera

Link | Posted on Aug 4, 2020 at 06:28 UTC as 318th comment | 2 replies
On article Sony a7S III initial review (2299 comments in total)
In reply to:

Thoughts R Us: What's needed is a more in depth comparison between the A7SIII and the Panasonic S1H. And honest opinions by video pro's, not necessarily all Youtubers, as to which one is best.

I absolutely agree with you that competition can significantly accelerate development cycles and improve performance/price ratio for the benefit of the customers.

However, there is one catch: when you look at the history of Sony MILC devopment during the past 8+ years, every generational iteration of the A6x00 and A7x families suffered from one snag or another: too little lenses available, then the menu structure, then it was bad AF, then it was the color science, then it was compressed Raw, then it was overheating, then too slow cards, subpar video Codecs, lack of 10bit video and what not.

That being said, Sony took their time to eliminate ALL of these shortcomings from the previous Gen A7sii to the current A7siii. I guess they aimed for the "perfect" videography camera - and they succeeded.

Link | Posted on Aug 2, 2020 at 15:14 UTC
On article Sony a7S III initial review (2299 comments in total)
In reply to:

Thoughts R Us: What's needed is a more in depth comparison between the A7SIII and the Panasonic S1H. And honest opinions by video pro's, not necessarily all Youtubers, as to which one is best.

The rumor that the siii has been ready in 2018 has been debunked. It's more than unlikely that the processing (CPU) power and processing efficiency (performance per Watt) was available at the time.

Link | Posted on Aug 2, 2020 at 12:20 UTC
On article Sony a7S III initial review (2299 comments in total)
In reply to:

StoneJack: It is clear that Sony has lost its momentum in mirrorless cameras, especially full frame ones, because until 2018 no one else bothered to enter that segment, but it was important not for stills but for growing digital hybrid video market and Sony did have an advantage with AF. But Nikon with Z6 in 2018, later Panasonic and Canon all entered the market with remarkable models, leapfrogging original Sony specs. Sony is trying to reestablish itself in full frame mirrorless, but it is already behind Canon and Panasonic in the full frame video segment and it loses the cost-performance comparison to Nikon. All Canon, Nikon and Sony have now great AF in video, but Nikon and Canon have also an advantage in stills and also produce incredible flagship DSLR, which Sony doesn't make.So whatever advantage Sony had, is being erased and the race is now led by Canon (I am Nikon user).Whatever YT shills like Gerald or Sony Northrop are saying, the truth is FF mirrorless has a new king, and it is Canon

For videogaphers who want most versatile and best possible and reliable quality recording experience currently available with a FF camera in a very pocketable form factor, there is no better than A7siii at this price point, hands down.
So, Sony ticked virtually *all* boxes with this one.
With no recording time limitations, the A7siii is a dream come true for those taping long interviews, talks or services.
It's also unrivaled in low light videography, it's almost a military-grade night-vision tool.
And look at how small it is. It delivers video quality close to the professional FX9 but at the fraction of the cost and the size.
Sony is not trailing Canon, Nikon, Fuji, Panasonic et al, with the A7siii, they are leading the bunch.

Link | Posted on Aug 2, 2020 at 10:12 UTC
On article Hands-on with the Sony a7S III (355 comments in total)
In reply to:

ottonis: I am kinda sick of all those "12 MP is not enough" comments.
The A7siii is a tool for videographers who want a low-light and DR king in a small and compact, highly portable size and form factor, that is ALSO capable of shooting SUPPORTING photos of great quality. That's it. Not less and not more.

Lack of 6k/8k recording? Is definitely an acceptable tradeoff for no overheating issues and very fast sensor read-out/ no significant rolling shutter.

Some people apparently don't realize that current technology cannot deliver everything at once in a small dorm factor, so Sony went out to get the best possible balance between most useful and best workflow, great quality and overall usability.
And the A7siii seems to be just that - a perfectly balanced, highly advanced workhorse.

@Mortal Lion: Ahahahaa, this made my day. This is an excellent advice! :-)

Link | Posted on Jul 30, 2020 at 13:59 UTC
On article Hands-on with the Sony a7S III (355 comments in total)
In reply to:

ottonis: I am kinda sick of all those "12 MP is not enough" comments.
The A7siii is a tool for videographers who want a low-light and DR king in a small and compact, highly portable size and form factor, that is ALSO capable of shooting SUPPORTING photos of great quality. That's it. Not less and not more.

Lack of 6k/8k recording? Is definitely an acceptable tradeoff for no overheating issues and very fast sensor read-out/ no significant rolling shutter.

Some people apparently don't realize that current technology cannot deliver everything at once in a small dorm factor, so Sony went out to get the best possible balance between most useful and best workflow, great quality and overall usability.
And the A7siii seems to be just that - a perfectly balanced, highly advanced workhorse.

The A7siii is clearly not made and not meant for stills shooters!
Do you guys complain about the Lumix GH5s low resolution? No, because none of you would even consider this 5 MP camera for anything stills related.

So, why bashing the A7siii for something that it is not and that it not even pretends to be?
It CAN also shoot lovely 12MP stills - that's a nice option, but not a selling point.

Link | Posted on Jul 30, 2020 at 13:12 UTC
On article Hands-on with the Sony a7S III (355 comments in total)

I am kinda sick of all those "12 MP is not enough" comments.
The A7siii is a tool for videographers who want a low-light and DR king in a small and compact, highly portable size and form factor, that is ALSO capable of shooting SUPPORTING photos of great quality. That's it. Not less and not more.

Lack of 6k/8k recording? Is definitely an acceptable tradeoff for no overheating issues and very fast sensor read-out/ no significant rolling shutter.

Some people apparently don't realize that current technology cannot deliver everything at once in a small dorm factor, so Sony went out to get the best possible balance between most useful and best workflow, great quality and overall usability.
And the A7siii seems to be just that - a perfectly balanced, highly advanced workhorse.

Link | Posted on Jul 29, 2020 at 18:18 UTC as 38th comment | 10 replies
In reply to:

aaaja: Sony has 'strange' track record when it coms to productlines. They dropped mobile phones, notebooks and other products, when competition became strong. If i had to decide for a few millions on equipment, this would be a point to make me reluctant. Mainly because the Camera Market is in troubles or will be in trouble soon. Iphones and co. are killing the point and shoot part and soon also HQ visual tools. Does Sony, Canon, Nikon etc.. be there in 3 years? 5 years..

@aaaja
Sony has high stakes in cameraphones as well. Not only do they produce cameraphone sensors, they have also been developing and refining cameracentric smartphones, while Canon, Nikon, Fuji etc didn't do that.

Link | Posted on Jul 24, 2020 at 08:33 UTC
In reply to:

Oleg Ivanovskiy: I think the whole idea of sticking to one brand is very limiting and sounds like totalitarianism, it's a 20th century approach. Slow in reaction and prone to one man's mistakes affecting the whole company. Why not give your staff а freedom to shoot with what they want, as far as they manage to bring home the results?

Streamlined processing parameters and infrastructure? A sweet deal with the manufacturer to deliver updates, new models and other equipment and certainly a special servicing deal at lower cost?
Apparently, AP already tried some local cooperations with SOny and they have been pleased with it, so there you have it.

Link | Posted on Jul 24, 2020 at 08:31 UTC

The point quite a few commenters are missing is that this decision to switch over to Sony was not made just yesterday but was a process over several years. Apparently, AP realized the potential benefits of mirroless cameras quite early and then probably waited the right moment of a mirrorless system to reach a sufficient level of maturity, versatility and meet professional demands in order to switch over.
And since Sony FF MICLs are those with the longest time of development and highest level of maturity, it was just consequential to pick Sony cameras.

Well done, AP!

The benefit for the consumers is that this prestigious deal with AP is an incentive for Sony to keep on innovating and staying dedicated to its MILC FF system, rather than abandon it like Samsung did with its marvelous but unfortunate APS-C MILCs.

Link | Posted on Jul 24, 2020 at 08:28 UTC as 84th comment | 3 replies
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