ottonis

Lives in Germany Germany
Joined on Dec 16, 2011

Comments

Total: 80, showing: 1 – 20
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Dear DPReview staff,

thank you for this very useful overview of Photoshop alternatives, but I truly missed Corel Photo Paint and Corel Paint Shop Pro in this collection.

Link | Posted on Aug 24, 2016 at 17:42 UTC as 8th comment

Some very nice photos here! Even more impressive when considering that these pics were taken in the context of camera gear testing.

Keep on the good work, guys!

Best

David

Link | Posted on Aug 20, 2016 at 18:56 UTC as 14th comment
In reply to:

ProfHankD: I wonder how many actual DEATHS have been caused by people taking photos? You know, backing-up into traffic as you try to fit everything into the frame or falling off a cliff while striking a pose for a selfie.... it's at least hundreds -- https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_selfie-related_injuries_and_deaths . After all, tens of thousands have died because of texting or making calls on a cell phone; 16,000 between 2001-2007 according to http://www.reuters.com/article/us-cellphones-driving-idUSTRE68M53K20100923 .

Photography - more dangerous than commonly believed!

"Two things are infinite: the universe and human stupidity; and I’m not sure about th’universe!"
(A. Einstein)

Link | Posted on Aug 17, 2016 at 05:51 UTC
On article 6 tips for better wildflower photos (58 comments in total)
In reply to:

WilliamJ: Oh my ! I've stopped just after reading "Choose the right gear for the job" thinking in myself: oh no, not again !!!

Do people writing for dpreview readers think we are all dumbs like stones, or what ? I can't bear any longer this sort of stupidity. And what's next ? The as well spoiled "do your homeworks" ?

Just because you are a professional who may (or may not) know everything, doesn't mean that others (like me) could not benefit from such basic articles. The advice given was sound and the examplary shots were pretty - a great little basic resource that has definitely enlighted me quite a bit and that will help me take better wildflower photos.

Link | Posted on Aug 15, 2016 at 06:22 UTC
On article 6 tips for better wildflower photos (58 comments in total)

Thanks for this great little article and the beautiful shots. It's an excellent introduction for beginners like me.

Link | Posted on Aug 15, 2016 at 05:40 UTC as 13th comment
On article An introduction to our studio test scene (105 comments in total)

Dear DPReview team,

thanks for sharing background information on what is certainly one of the best studio scenes for IQ comparisons. While I always consult different sources, your reviews and in particular your studio scene are among those I appreciate most.
Kudos for the good work and your dedication.
Keep on the good stuff and never stop improving on what is already an excellent tool.

Best

David

Link | Posted on Aug 8, 2016 at 19:28 UTC as 33rd comment

The idea of a Hasselblad camera module is great. However, a 10x zoom lens THAT small as shown in the render means two things: a very very tiny sensor, a truly slow lens (in terms of f-stops), or both.
So, I am excited and anxious about that announcement but also quite sceptical. Time will tell....

Link | Posted on Aug 5, 2016 at 19:57 UTC as 13th comment
In reply to:

elefteriadis alexandros: Its a same and sad that Microsoft destroyed NOKIA brand with their pathetic software.
NOKIA is one of the best - if not the best - phone manufacturer out there. I have the 1520 and the quality of hardware is top notch.

@3DSimmon: absolutely right, Nokia software developers simply didn't manage to advance Symbian OS to a state where it would offer similar user experience as iOS or the (back then) emerging Android OS. Moreover, although everybody is prasing the great Nokia "hardware", I think that their major cameraphone flagships (e.g. the Nokia N8) were massively underpowered and limited by choice of subpar CPUs. The camera modules, however have been industry-leading and pushed the envelope of what cameraphones can do. The Nokia N8 IQ easily destroyed point-and-shoot-cameras of that time. The Nokia build quality was also legendary.
The inability of the Symbian OS to allow for screen resolutions greater than 640 x 400 pixels was inexplicable. Nokia, THE mobile phone industry leader until ca. 2010, should have taken their billions of revenues and hire the best OS programmers, even if they had to headhunt them from Apple, Google, Microsoft etc. Instead, they relied on their own developers...

Link | Posted on Aug 4, 2016 at 17:09 UTC
In reply to:

Osa25: Nokia cameras are a bit the "Sigma DP compact" of the smartphone world. It's a bit of a masochist's taste for pain as pleasure....

Have you ever used the Nokia N8? In terms of camera functionality and usability it was excellent; it was the first offering of lossless digital zoom on mobile phone cameras and the IQ was just stunning. It was also reasonably easy to operate.
So, with regards to "camera"-functions the Nokia N8 was not at all painful. However, the underlying Symbian OS has so badly implemented basic internet and email functions that the "smartphone"-functionality was indeed a major pain to use.

Link | Posted on Aug 4, 2016 at 16:53 UTC
In reply to:

ottonis: Microsoft didn't value their biggest asset and their best trick up their sleeves: the Nokia imaging harwdware expertise.
The first camera-centric phone after the transition from Nokia-Symbian phones to Microsoft-Nokia Lumia phones, the Lumia 1020, was already a downgrade to the previous Nokia 808 and Nokia N8 cameraphones. I have the Nokia N8 and its stills image quality blows away anything I have seen from Android smartphones (including Samsung Galaxy Note 4, HTC One X etc.), despite being a sensor/camera module from 2011, which is almost an eternity by today's standards and speed of technological development.
Instead on building upon the Lumia 1020 and further refine and improve its main drawbacks (ultra-slow processing speed, soft corners, disappointing dynamic range etc.) in new iterations/successors, they just stopped further developing the imaging performance.
One of Nokias best imaging pundits, Damian Dinning, left Nokia in the wake of the Microsoft acquisition.

(continued). I guess Dinning had anticipated that imaging was not going to be a major focus anymore after Microsoft acquired Nokia, and this is exactly what happened: even though Microsoft had virtually unlimited resources to deeply integrate imaging features into the OS and to adapt the hardware accordingly (e.g. by larger buffer sizes, faster memory, maybe integrate specialized imaging-coprocessors etc.), the imaging performance of the Lumia phones started to be indistinguishable from the mainstream Android/Apple-smartphones. Once being a major differentiating point, Lumia imaging dropped to a me-too-level under Microsoft guidance.

So, seeing the old Nokia imaging pundits (at least some of them) return back to Nokia sounds promising because there is hoping that the new Nokia might try to push the limits of mobile imaging once again. The venerable Nokia N8 used to be a revelation, easily beating point-and shoot-cameras of that time. Come on Nokia, do it again!!!

Link | Posted on Aug 3, 2016 at 09:59 UTC

Microsoft didn't value their biggest asset and their best trick up their sleeves: the Nokia imaging harwdware expertise.
The first camera-centric phone after the transition from Nokia-Symbian phones to Microsoft-Nokia Lumia phones, the Lumia 1020, was already a downgrade to the previous Nokia 808 and Nokia N8 cameraphones. I have the Nokia N8 and its stills image quality blows away anything I have seen from Android smartphones (including Samsung Galaxy Note 4, HTC One X etc.), despite being a sensor/camera module from 2011, which is almost an eternity by today's standards and speed of technological development.
Instead on building upon the Lumia 1020 and further refine and improve its main drawbacks (ultra-slow processing speed, soft corners, disappointing dynamic range etc.) in new iterations/successors, they just stopped further developing the imaging performance.
One of Nokias best imaging pundits, Damian Dinning, left Nokia in the wake of the Microsoft acquisition.

Link | Posted on Aug 3, 2016 at 09:44 UTC as 16th comment | 1 reply
On article All about control: Huawei P9 camera review (77 comments in total)

First of all, thanks to Lars Rehm and dpreview for this nice and useful review.

It is just incredible how Huawei managed to let the combined output of two sensors perform worse than competitors' mobile cameras sporting only one single sensor. What a waste of resources. One would have expected a dual sensor setup to deliver twice as much SNR, half the noise and higher dynamic range, but they did't deliver. I was so excited about this promising dual sensor approach and anxious to read the reviews, now I am quite disappointed. I truly hope that future iterations of the dual sensor concept will work better than that. They really should.
Moreover, I wonder why they used a max aperture of only f/2.2 whereas other manufactureres have alerady reached f/1.8. That's more than half a stop of light....

Link | Posted on Jul 23, 2016 at 12:42 UTC as 14th comment
In reply to:

Kaso: While we're at it, let's have a dial/slider that goes from 1 to 16, with 1 (wide open) being the new Light mode, 16 (stopped way down) being the old Dark mode, and the in-between values being shades of grey.

@Kaso: Let's not go overboard! If you really need to a fine granular control over your visual reading experience, you can turn on the reading mode of your mobile device (my Samsung Tab S2 has it) or you could install a screen filter app that reduces contrasts and reduces eye strain by filtering out blue spectrum wavelengths.

Link | Posted on Jun 26, 2016 at 11:51 UTC
In reply to:

ecka84: Decisions like that should never be based on opinions from mostly ignorant majority (including me, in many cases).
I find this situation silly and even pretty offensive, specially when DPR administration comments are like - "you can keep the page black" or "this was driven by user demand, nothing else" - which are just as inattentively & negligently unconcerning, as if a drug dealer would say - "don't buy heroin, if you don't like it, I'm not the problem ... you are". Many people don't care to learn about what's bad for them. Others are just careless in many departments (trust me, I'm one of them/you), even health or comfort, which to them is like an unpredictable and unmanageable magic, or god's will. That's just wrong.
"The white page makes it easier to read" - Yeah, sure, for a year or two, and then you start not seeing anything without glasses. Followed by endless discussions about 'not seeing the difference between crop and FF'.

ecka84 wrote: "Decisions like that should never be based on opinions from mostly ignorant majority..."

Well, if you don't listen to your readership, the readership will eventually leave. So, yes, it was an excellent decision by dpreview to please people preferring black as well those preferring the bright style. Offering both options will imporove the reading experience of a broader user base than offering one style only.

Link | Posted on Jun 26, 2016 at 11:42 UTC
In reply to:

LDunn1: If you are on a battery powered device (phone, iPad, laptop etc) then, I suspect the all white display would use more power.

Unfortunately, power savings will take effect in devices with AMOLED displays only. All these Apple devices have LED displays, which do not benefit from inidividual black pixels.

Link | Posted on Jun 26, 2016 at 11:34 UTC

Great options and great work, as always by DPReview!
I am very grateful for the option to get back to the black color scheme, as I am reading dpreview.com mostly on my mobile devices which are sporting AMOLED-screens. A black background lets the AMOLED screen shut down all black pixels (LED screens do NOT, however), which translates to significant power-savings and extends battery life.

Keep up the good work!

Best regards

David

Link | Posted on Jun 26, 2016 at 11:29 UTC as 37th comment
On article Sony warns against use of unauthorized third-party apps (183 comments in total)

Guys, first have a look at these hacks before negatively commenting!
One of the most ridiculous restrictions on DSLRS and MILCs is the tax-driven 30 minutes-limit of video recording. One of those hacks has actually successfully overcome this limitation on the A7s, which is most welcome for all those who want to record a talk/presentation in high quality.
Of course does Sony legally need to distance themselves from that. On the other hand: It's their very own press release that was the greatest advertisement for this hack and making more people want/buy an A7s which is certainly among the most affordable pro-level video cameras available today

Link | Posted on Jun 22, 2016 at 17:48 UTC as 11th comment | 1 reply
On article 2016 Roundup: $1200-2000 ILCs part 2: Full-Frame (285 comments in total)

Dear DPR,

was there a specific reason for omitting the Nikon D750? Its price is consistently below 2000 USD and it would probably be among the best cameras on your list.

Best

David

Link | Posted on Jun 11, 2016 at 10:30 UTC as 19th comment | 1 reply
In reply to:

browndt: Obviously we have an interview as part of the marketing phase. The question is why would anyone buy the a6300 without any decent small lenses. I get that these lenses are for FF, but why would they copy Nikon, by not making many good lenses for APS-C. This seems to be where camera companies are heading, go FF or use your phone.

browndt wrote: "Obviously we have an interview as part of the marketing phase. The question is why would anyone buy the a6300 without any decent small lenses."

Well, there *are* quite a few decent small native E-mount lenses:
--->SEL 10-18mm f/4
--> Zeiss Touit 12 mm f/2.8
--> Zeiss 24mm f/1.8
--> Zeiss Touit 32 mm f/1.8
--> SEL 35 mm f/1.8 OSS
--> SEL 50 mm f/1.8 OSS
--> 16-70mm f/4 zoom

Link | Posted on Feb 5, 2016 at 05:24 UTC

@ all the dudes here complaining about sample pictures being "uninspired" or in whatever else way "not good enough" to their standards:
.
Apparently, you guys forget that this was NOT a professional fashion shooting, where ONE photographer was shooting ONE model thousands of times over several hours, just to pick the best 5 pictures from perhaps 500+. Not to mention lack of control over lighting, model acting/posing etc.
Moreover, you guys conveniently forget that the reviewers here were given equipment they never before had in their hands (entirely new lenses and to some of them possibly even the cameras) without any chance to get accustomed to the new tech. Tell me ONE professional photographer who gets entirely NEW gear, gets out, takes 20 shots and all them are masterpieces? In what delusional world are you living, or are you just hating for no reason?

And I always thought that fanboy-ism was constrained to the guys < 16 years of age.....

Link | Posted on Feb 5, 2016 at 00:24 UTC as 18th comment | 3 replies
Total: 80, showing: 1 – 20
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