Pritzl

Lives in Canada Toronto, Canada
Joined on Nov 18, 2011

Comments

Total: 194, showing: 1 – 20
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To all those who still found a reason to whine, please return the update to Fuji and ask for a refund. Thank you for your assistance. :P

Link | Posted on Mar 23, 2017 at 14:14 UTC as 24th comment
On article Fujifilm X-T20 Review (310 comments in total)
In reply to:

Pritzl: Hoping the XT-20 sells well because the better it sells, the more likely I will be able to afford an XT-2.

I had a chance to try a friend's X-T1 for a while. I fell in love with the size and responsiveness of the EVF. Couple its WYSIWYG view with tactile controls and I found myself spending more time thinking about the picture rather than the camera; which is the point after all isn't it?

Unfortunately, I found moving the focus point with my eye to the EVF using the touchpad a bit challenging because of the smaller body. I even came on to the forum at the time and wondered how expensive adding an AF joystick would be. Bottom line, the joystick, 24MP and better AF are definitely worth the extra over the X-T1 and the joystick on its own is worth it over the X-T20 in my case. Just need to stretch my budget a little.

Link | Posted on Mar 21, 2017 at 20:04 UTC
In reply to:

Pritzl: WOW Rishi, you must be the life of any party you attend eh? :P

Seriously though, "it's the lenses stupid!" What we need now is something revolutionary to lighter and smaller fast aperture lenses, regardless of sensor format.

The problem is physics. Until lens designers come up with something other than glass we're stuck with the trade-off of size/weight vs speed.

Link | Posted on Mar 21, 2017 at 19:58 UTC
On article Fujifilm X-T20 Review (310 comments in total)

Hoping the XT-20 sells well because the better it sells, the more likely I will be able to afford an XT-2.

Link | Posted on Mar 21, 2017 at 15:11 UTC as 86th comment | 2 replies
In reply to:

Terry Breedlove: OMG the equivalence idiocy is now going in the other direction. LOL Now in the DP bizarro world smaller sensors are better. Please make up your minds. Or just go by a damn camera any camera please and be happy taking photos in the real world.

At first, I was thinking the same thing; the argument for full frame was suddenly being dismissed when it came to even larger sensors. However, I realized that the key points are two-fold: faster available full frame lenses and more R&D into full-frame sensors making them a sweet-spot if ultimate image quality is what you are looking for.

That does not mean that (a) smaller sensors are useless (size is still a relevant factor); or (b) larger sensors cannot similarly improve with faster lenses and more R&D.

Link | Posted on Mar 21, 2017 at 15:08 UTC

WOW Rishi, you must be the life of any party you attend eh? :P

Seriously though, "it's the lenses stupid!" What we need now is something revolutionary to lighter and smaller fast aperture lenses, regardless of sensor format.

Link | Posted on Mar 21, 2017 at 15:04 UTC as 344th comment | 3 replies
In reply to:

Triplet Perar: Companies MUST rethink their lenses, because people keep their digital cameras at home and use smaller equipment, like smartphones, to take more photos.
Lenses are the main problem! We live in the age where cameras shoot ISO 1 million, but still are fed with lens behemoths and designs from the film era, like, gigantic f1.4 primes or f2.8 zooms are recommended stuff. C'mon!
Which company will be brave enough, visionary enough, to release three smallish f/4 of f5.6 zooms, and four f/4 primes, all tiny and small, much more portable?

If you are going to use a slow lens anyway, then what's the point in carrying the larger camera body housing the larger sensor? Why burden yourself with extra gear at all if your results will be comparable to those from a smartphone anyway?

Quite the contrary, I am hoping for more F2.0 and faster lenses, particularly for APS-C cameras. And before you complain, note that an F2.0 prime can be quite small, just a couple of quick examples:
https://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/1191420-REG/fujifilm_xf_35mm_f_2_r.html
https://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/898726-USA/Canon_5178b002_EF_35mm_f_2_0_IS.html
and an F1.8 zoom is possible too:
https://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/967344-REG/sigma_18_35mm_f1_8_dc_hsm.html

Link | Posted on Feb 7, 2017 at 17:00 UTC
On article iPhone 7 Plus survives 13 hours in icy Russian river (98 comments in total)

Don't trust everything you read on the internet, especially if the source is Russian!

Link | Posted on Jan 25, 2017 at 16:34 UTC as 14th comment | 2 replies
In reply to:

Pritzl: I remember a time when seeing yourself in an ad would be a nice conversation starter; guess that puts me squarely in the old fogies group. Now it's a cue to run to your lawyer and start salivating apparently.

For some contrast: https://www.thestar.com/news/gta/2017/01/09/460k-award-in-damages-upheld-after-durham-police-fail-to-protect-informants-identity.html
and the court of Appeal found the amount "“very generous” but nevertheless reasonable". And this was compensation for harassment that forced the family to move.

How much would she have sued for if she was poisoned at one of their restaurants?

Link | Posted on Jan 10, 2017 at 00:55 UTC

I remember a time when seeing yourself in an ad would be a nice conversation starter; guess that puts me squarely in the old fogies group. Now it's a cue to run to your lawyer and start salivating apparently.

Link | Posted on Jan 10, 2017 at 00:49 UTC as 81st comment | 1 reply
In reply to:

Ben O Connor: Lovely cams. But X line has huge lenses. I haven't see any seious pancake or folding zooms as microfourthirds offers.
X-T2 is a video beast of Pre-GH5 era. But will it remain same ?

X-Pro is also cool but huge for sensor/body ratio since sony made full frame 7 series.

Not to stir up the equivalence pot, but: Micro-four thirds, being smaller sensors, would have roughly the same size lenses if you account for aperture equivalence. i.e. to get the same amount of subject/background separation and light gathering ability as the, admittedly quite large, Fuji 16-55 f2.8 you would need, roughly, an F2 standard zoom.

That said, Fuji does offer 2 lines of lenses it seems: Large, no compromise beasts and slightly slower, though still well built normal size lenses. They don't do a lot of cheap'n'light lenses which I don't think are missed by the intended target audience.

Link | Posted on Jan 6, 2017 at 14:19 UTC
In reply to:

DuxX: Thanks to Television and photography one sick man, a killer, and one militant terrorist group is successfully sent their message to the world. Great job!
Who can say and prove now that all of this (photo session and message sending) is not planed before this monstrous crime against humanity, ha?

It's not the sane, rational people we are worried about.

Link | Posted on Dec 20, 2016 at 20:05 UTC
On article Modern Mirrorless: Canon EOS M5 Review (1628 comments in total)

I love Canon's usability and was waiting for a good stab at mirror-less from them for a while. I have a sneaking suspicion that this might be a case of too little, too late though.

Link | Posted on Dec 20, 2016 at 16:33 UTC as 177th comment
On article Action-packed: Sony a6500 review (1147 comments in total)
In reply to:

Pritzl: I have a stupid question? Sony are no longer digital imaging noobs and yet they continue to fail miserably on the user experience front. Are they oblivious to those failings or unwilling to invest the time/money to address that shortcoming?

It's a shame really because they do indeed pack their bodies to the gills with features. The problem is that it always seems that you are kept at arms length from the creative process by some odd design decisions. They are almost the polar opposite of Canon, who keep their esoteric decisions limited to artificially differentiating their line-up but offer some of the nicest handling cameras outside of Fuji. The first time I scrolled through a Sony menu, I immediately realized that I was not the target audience for their cameras.

Sony: soul-less bleeding edge tech baubles.
Canon: conservative dinosaurs that just work.
Fuji: Nirvana? I'll find out as soon as I figure out a cost-effective transition strategy.

I am not trying to win an argument. You have your opinion and I have mine. Sony has not done enough on the UI front to make their otherwise excellent cameras appealing to me. Cheers...

Link | Posted on Dec 16, 2016 at 20:09 UTC
On article Action-packed: Sony a6500 review (1147 comments in total)
In reply to:

Pritzl: I have a stupid question? Sony are no longer digital imaging noobs and yet they continue to fail miserably on the user experience front. Are they oblivious to those failings or unwilling to invest the time/money to address that shortcoming?

It's a shame really because they do indeed pack their bodies to the gills with features. The problem is that it always seems that you are kept at arms length from the creative process by some odd design decisions. They are almost the polar opposite of Canon, who keep their esoteric decisions limited to artificially differentiating their line-up but offer some of the nicest handling cameras outside of Fuji. The first time I scrolled through a Sony menu, I immediately realized that I was not the target audience for their cameras.

Sony: soul-less bleeding edge tech baubles.
Canon: conservative dinosaurs that just work.
Fuji: Nirvana? I'll find out as soon as I figure out a cost-effective transition strategy.

What's love got to do with it... da dum da dum...

I have used Sony cameras, I just don't own any right now. And again, I never said any brand was flawless or that everyone found the Sony UI annoying - though a lot do from what I've seen. I just mused that questionable UI is forgivable for a new player in the camera market - e.g. I don't expect that Yi camera to be great out of the gate - but Sony's been around a while and they seem either reluctant or unwilling to invest in improving the UI. Maybe they also think there's nothing wrong with it.

And UI is not just menus by the way, it's control layout, tactile response, ergonomics etc... The menu systems just happens to be one of the more glaring problems from my perspective.

Link | Posted on Dec 15, 2016 at 19:23 UTC
On article Action-packed: Sony a6500 review (1147 comments in total)
In reply to:

Pritzl: I have a stupid question? Sony are no longer digital imaging noobs and yet they continue to fail miserably on the user experience front. Are they oblivious to those failings or unwilling to invest the time/money to address that shortcoming?

It's a shame really because they do indeed pack their bodies to the gills with features. The problem is that it always seems that you are kept at arms length from the creative process by some odd design decisions. They are almost the polar opposite of Canon, who keep their esoteric decisions limited to artificially differentiating their line-up but offer some of the nicest handling cameras outside of Fuji. The first time I scrolled through a Sony menu, I immediately realized that I was not the target audience for their cameras.

Sony: soul-less bleeding edge tech baubles.
Canon: conservative dinosaurs that just work.
Fuji: Nirvana? I'll find out as soon as I figure out a cost-effective transition strategy.

As for it not being important, I certainly disagree. In my opinion, the true mark of a good camera is one that gets out of the way of you taking pictures. A body that adds hurdles to your creative vision is just annoying; you end up fighting the camera instead of focusing on what you are trying to capture which is far more important. Time spent looking at a menu is time you could have spent finding a better angle, assessing the light or waiting for the ideal moment.

Link | Posted on Dec 14, 2016 at 22:42 UTC
On article Action-packed: Sony a6500 review (1147 comments in total)
In reply to:

Pritzl: I have a stupid question? Sony are no longer digital imaging noobs and yet they continue to fail miserably on the user experience front. Are they oblivious to those failings or unwilling to invest the time/money to address that shortcoming?

It's a shame really because they do indeed pack their bodies to the gills with features. The problem is that it always seems that you are kept at arms length from the creative process by some odd design decisions. They are almost the polar opposite of Canon, who keep their esoteric decisions limited to artificially differentiating their line-up but offer some of the nicest handling cameras outside of Fuji. The first time I scrolled through a Sony menu, I immediately realized that I was not the target audience for their cameras.

Sony: soul-less bleeding edge tech baubles.
Canon: conservative dinosaurs that just work.
Fuji: Nirvana? I'll find out as soon as I figure out a cost-effective transition strategy.

I'm sorry but Sony menus and controls are simply non intuitive. It takes a while to figure what feature is where; a lot longer than on a Canon body. I suspect part of the problem is the number of features but obscure naming/location of functions is certainly a big factor. Whenever I've picked up a Sony body (NEX-5, RX100, A6300) I've invariably arrived at a point where I'm not taking pictures and just staring at the rear screen trying to figure out how to get the camera to do what I want. As I noted earlier though, maybe I'm not the target audience.

Unless you're digging around in the custom menus, Canon is straightforward for 99% of my daily use.

Last but not least, the simple addition of a tab for your favourite settings saves a ton of menu digging time. Couple it with an extremely responsive touch-screen and menu-diving time is severely curtailed.

Nikon I did not comment on because of limited experience.

At the end of the day, it's just my opinion and you're free to differ.

Link | Posted on Dec 14, 2016 at 22:37 UTC
On article Action-packed: Sony a6500 review (1147 comments in total)

I have a stupid question? Sony are no longer digital imaging noobs and yet they continue to fail miserably on the user experience front. Are they oblivious to those failings or unwilling to invest the time/money to address that shortcoming?

It's a shame really because they do indeed pack their bodies to the gills with features. The problem is that it always seems that you are kept at arms length from the creative process by some odd design decisions. They are almost the polar opposite of Canon, who keep their esoteric decisions limited to artificially differentiating their line-up but offer some of the nicest handling cameras outside of Fuji. The first time I scrolled through a Sony menu, I immediately realized that I was not the target audience for their cameras.

Sony: soul-less bleeding edge tech baubles.
Canon: conservative dinosaurs that just work.
Fuji: Nirvana? I'll find out as soon as I figure out a cost-effective transition strategy.

Link | Posted on Dec 14, 2016 at 19:14 UTC as 115th comment | 15 replies
On article Gear of the Year: Richard's choice - Fujifilm X-T2 (172 comments in total)

A capable sensor in a beautifully tactile and functional body backed by a really great lens line-up. What's not to like?

If I did not suck at selling gear I would have made the switch to Fuji already.

Link | Posted on Dec 14, 2016 at 16:58 UTC as 32nd comment | 2 replies
In reply to:

virtualreality: I wish manufacturers would stop selling cameras that are not finished.

I'm not sure that adding features is the equivalent of completing an unfinished camera.

Link | Posted on Nov 29, 2016 at 22:51 UTC
Total: 194, showing: 1 – 20
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