Richard Butler

Richard Butler

DPReview Administrator
Lives in United Kingdom Seattle, United Kingdom
Joined on Nov 7, 2007

Comments

Total: 4801, showing: 21 – 40
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On article Nikon D7500: Should I upgrade from my D7200? (256 comments in total)
In reply to:

Dr_Jon: Does slide 10 mean people shouldn't use old Nikon batteries of the same size that presumably will fit in it?

There were two types of EN-EL15, some of which ran down really quickly in the D500, the new ones were fine, but it was hard to tell which was which until you looked closely (The new ones said Li20 in small letters on them).

My guess (and it's only that, based on vague talk of changes to 'power management') is that Nikon has rebranded the Li20-style EN-EL15s so that you know which you're ordering/getting.

Link | Posted on Apr 18, 2017 at 23:55 UTC
On article Canon EOS 77D Review (247 comments in total)
In reply to:

Najinsky: So, DPR, please help me understand.

They put their very best APS-C sensor in a mid level enthusiast camera for $900.

It's an excellent sensor, with base ISO DR the same as full frame sensors from a few years ago, such as the Nikon D4.

But because it's not the very best APS-C sensor available, that's now a "Con".

And to squeeze it into this category, you introduce the role of peers; citing D7200 and A6300.

D7200, a camera introduced for $300 more.

A6300, also introduced at slightly higher price ($1000) but a now a mirrorless camera?

Why not Sony's most recent APS-C DSLR, the A68. Which has almost identical sensor performance to the Canon (Canon fractions better but negligible)?

Say we accept a mirrorless 'peer', so what about the Fujifilm X-T2 for $1600 or the cheaper X-T20. These have near identical sensor performance to the Canon (fractions). Yet for those, sensor DR is not a "Con".

I get that you like to rib Canon a bit, but is the DR of this camera really a "Con"?

I think it's fair to call a stop's difference in DR a visible as well as measurable difference.

Beyond base ISO you give up 1EV of DR for every stop of amplification that's been applied. Most people think of this, plus the additional stop of shot noise from reduced exposure, as noise performance. About which we've made no criticism.

Link | Posted on Apr 18, 2017 at 23:08 UTC
On article Canon EOS 77D Review (247 comments in total)
In reply to:

Najinsky: So, DPR, please help me understand.

They put their very best APS-C sensor in a mid level enthusiast camera for $900.

It's an excellent sensor, with base ISO DR the same as full frame sensors from a few years ago, such as the Nikon D4.

But because it's not the very best APS-C sensor available, that's now a "Con".

And to squeeze it into this category, you introduce the role of peers; citing D7200 and A6300.

D7200, a camera introduced for $300 more.

A6300, also introduced at slightly higher price ($1000) but a now a mirrorless camera?

Why not Sony's most recent APS-C DSLR, the A68. Which has almost identical sensor performance to the Canon (Canon fractions better but negligible)?

Say we accept a mirrorless 'peer', so what about the Fujifilm X-T2 for $1600 or the cheaper X-T20. These have near identical sensor performance to the Canon (fractions). Yet for those, sensor DR is not a "Con".

I get that you like to rib Canon a bit, but is the DR of this camera really a "Con"?

The 77D doesn't directly compare with anyone else's product range, D5600 is cheaper, D7200/D7500 is more expensive, for example. It's a similar case with a6000 and a6300. And, except for very specific niches, we consider ILCs as a single category, regardless of whether they have mirrors. This means mirrorless cameras are expected to live up to the standards of DSLRs and *vice versa*.

But the Pros and Cons are lists of factors that the would-be buyer might want to consider. It's not a checklist where one Pro cancels out each Con: it's up to each reader to decide whether each factor matters to them or not.

Canon's latest chips have less downstream read noise than the older ones, which means they have better dynamic range. However, it is visually (as well as measurably) still behind the chips used in just about everyone else's cameras. Its much less of a problem than it was, but it's not so small that we're going to pretend it's not there.

Link | Posted on Apr 18, 2017 at 21:47 UTC
On article Canon EOS 77D Review (247 comments in total)
In reply to:

mosc: What's all the naming fuss. It has a pentamirror doesn't it? It's a Rebel T7s. Canon Jerks.

Top plate LCD and a second control dial as a market differentiation makes no sense to me.

I've adjusted the Con where it was already highlighted and added some detail to the conclusion that it's the smallest viewfinder to appear in an XXD series Canon.

Link | Posted on Apr 18, 2017 at 19:38 UTC
On article Canon EOS 77D Review (247 comments in total)
In reply to:

MichalEs: DxO sensor measurements for 80D and M5 gave different results for dynamic range or high ISO noise. It' hints at a possibility of Canon using some slighly different sensors for other cameras than the one used in 80D. It would be very interesting to see if DPR dynamic range and ISO-invariance tests could confirm it, but sadly the review doesn't include these tests. Will it be added in the future?

I've just made them public so that they can be accessed from other review widgets.

There's perhaps [a *slight* difference](https://www.dpreview.com/reviews/image-comparison/fullscreen?attr134_0=canon_eos77d&attr134_1=canon_eos80d&attr134_2=canon_eos77d&attr134_3=canon_eos80d&attr136_0=12&attr136_1=12&attr136_2=16&attr136_3=16&attr176_1=off&attr176_2=off&normalization=full&widget=465&x=0.14427747941347588&y=0.5688201983386605), but I wouldn't be confident in declaring it photographically relevant.

Link | Posted on Apr 18, 2017 at 19:01 UTC
On article Canon EOS 77D Review (247 comments in total)
In reply to:

entoman: It's a great shame that the pentamirror viewfinders fitted to this (and most other) "budget" DSLRs are so poor - a bit like peering down a dark tunnel. A proper pentaprism would add to the cost and weight, but surely not by a huge amount? The poor viewfinder experience is quite likely to convince a lot of potential buyers to go mirrorless. Canon, Nikon and Pentax all need to look seriously at ways in which they can improve the viewfinder experience of their budget DSLRs.

In fairness, Pentax has always been good at putting prism finders into cameras much further down their range than the other two DSLR makers.

Link | Posted on Apr 18, 2017 at 18:55 UTC
On article Canon EOS 77D Review (247 comments in total)
In reply to:

Tonkotsu Ramen: "Once you're in Live View, though, you'll have a camera that's every bit as responsive as it is while you're shooting through the optical viewfinder."

Sites like imaging resource show that the EOS-M6 is quite a bit slower (over half a second per shot, vs <.30 seconds per shot) than the 77D (through the viewfinder), are you guys implying that the 77D live view is faster than the M6?

I haven't got the 77D to hand, but I've just done some playing with the T7i (which is essentially the same internals, again).

There's no perceptible difference in speed between live view shooting and OVF shooting. (I tried in both single point mode and the modes where the camera selects an AF point). When compared on the same basis, there's no meaningful difference between them. I'd be inclined to reach the same conclusion as Carey, that they're every bit as responsive as one another.

Without knowing exactly how IR conducts its tests, I don't want to speculate why they're measuring that difference, but I'm not experiencing it.

The M6 uses different lenses, of course, which could make some difference, but on the T7i, there's no significant performance difference.

Link | Posted on Apr 18, 2017 at 18:31 UTC
On article Fujifilm X100F Review (740 comments in total)
In reply to:

basil_imperitor: I'm confused by the samples given for the digital teleconverter. It's the exact same framing for each image, so it just looks like a series of degraded quality JPEGs.

Would it be possible to get samples taken "in the real world" on a tripod, that shows the teleconverter in action from a single spot? The space needle from 35, 50, and 70mm.

The logic was that we thought most people interested in the X100F would be able to approximately visualise what taking a 50mm and 70mm equivalent crop would look like.

What seemed more important was the impact on image quality, which we figured would be most easily assessed by showing the same detail at the same size. In other words, we were trying to test the impact, rather than illustrating the feature.

Charlieangle - There's no reason to expect up-sizing a crop to give a better result than the crop itself, since you can't create data. You can guess what that data might have been (I believe Sony attempts this in some modes), but it's just a guess. So here we've shown what detail will look like in each mode.

Link | Posted on Apr 18, 2017 at 17:47 UTC
On article Canon EOS 77D Review (247 comments in total)
In reply to:

Tonkotsu Ramen: disappointing that canon continues to artificially remove features like adjustable minimum shutter speed for auto ISO n such.

And in-camera Raw conversion.

Link | Posted on Apr 18, 2017 at 17:31 UTC
On article Canon EOS 77D Review (247 comments in total)
In reply to:

uMad: So this camera, which is very similar in 1080p quality and lacks a 4K mode, get's a higher video rating than the X-T20?

dpreview, you have become really pathetic.

I looked into it and that was an error.

The 77D scores fairly well for video because between its really easy-to-use, dependable autofocus and its effective electronic stabilization, it's one of the easiest cameras to shoot video with. However, that doesn't completely excuse it being limited to 1080.

Link | Posted on Apr 18, 2017 at 17:30 UTC
On article Nikon D7500: Should I upgrade from my D7200? (256 comments in total)
In reply to:

Alexis D: Nice job, Richard. Nikon can use all the help it can get at this time.

Given I concluded that, unless you need the buffer depth, it's probably not worth it, and that it's worth considering picking up a D7200 at end-of-life (lower profit margin) prices, I can't imagine Nikon being particularly delighted.

Link | Posted on Apr 17, 2017 at 21:00 UTC
On article Nikon D7500: Should I upgrade from my D7200? (256 comments in total)
In reply to:

Sean65: You didn't mention 'build quality' which is a significant strength in favour of the D500.

This article isn't about the D500.

Link | Posted on Apr 17, 2017 at 20:56 UTC
On article Fujifilm GFX 50S vs Pentax 645Z vs Hasselblad X1D (337 comments in total)
In reply to:

Peiasdf: And you know DPReview isn't going to review any of them so we will never know how these three stood up to A7R II, 5DR and D810.

:)

We're currently checking whether we got everything we needed with the X1D to complete the review.

Link | Posted on Apr 14, 2017 at 18:40 UTC
In reply to:

George1958: Based on two months sales according to some?

Based on two months sales according to the press release.

Link | Posted on Apr 14, 2017 at 17:55 UTC
On article Fujifilm GFX 50S vs Pentax 645Z vs Hasselblad X1D (337 comments in total)
In reply to:

Peiasdf: And you know DPReview isn't going to review any of them so we will never know how these three stood up to A7R II, 5DR and D810.

No, no s1rf4n, Peisadf is completely correct: that's why there's not [a page in the GFX 50S review](https://www.dpreview.com/reviews/fujifilm-gfx-50s/8) making exactly this comparison.

Link | Posted on Apr 14, 2017 at 17:41 UTC
On article Nikon D7500 vs Nikon D500: Which is better for you? (387 comments in total)
In reply to:

Triplet Perar: What is the purpose of D7500? I mean, can somebody tell, what Nikon had in mind (if that is possible to know or guess), for issuing one more same sewing machine?

People do love to compare launch prices to end-of-life markdowns and conclude that prices have jumped.

I saw someone yesterday complaining the Canon 5D IV price had been hiked to an outrageous degree, whereas the launch price is the same as every other model in the 5D series, which means they've got cheaper in real terms.

Link | Posted on Apr 14, 2017 at 17:37 UTC
On article Nikon D7500 vs Nikon D500: Which is better for you? (387 comments in total)
In reply to:

Shotmaker2: They gave it the wrong number but I understand why. The D7500 is the successor to the D5600, NOT the D7200. They had to go with a D7XXX number due to the unexpected increase in cost and therefore, price.

The D7200 is not going anywhere. The other reason for the D7500 is that too many D500 sensors were made relative to the demand. No reason for most photographers to purchase the D7500 since better options are available.

We are still waiting for Nikon's anniversary camera most likely coming out in June, or thereabouts.

So it's a D5X00 series with an AF drive pin, twin dials, larger viewfinder (all features usually reserved for D7X00 series).

Not a D7X00 series with only a single second slot and no battery grip to make way for the previously absent D500?

That's a *very* odd conclusion to reach.

Link | Posted on Apr 14, 2017 at 17:31 UTC
On article Nikon D7500 vs Nikon D500: Which is better for you? (387 comments in total)
In reply to:

CosminMunteanu: Dear Nikon .. why didn't you call the camera D6000 ? Why this strip down ?
Does the 7500 have internal memory, about 128 Gb (to justify the single card slot) ?
An upgrade means to add more, new features and/or to increase the performance of the existing ones.
What I understand is that from now on, you want pros (for whom the dual card slot is very important) to buy your 2000 usd/euro camera. If at least you would have been able to come up with new DX lens lineup. Unfortunately you were not able to do even this.

Who says a replacement has to be an upgrade?

The D40 was a step down from the D50 (presumably because the D50 and D70s were too similar). Companies segment the market and try to push certain types of buyer towards certain products. If wedding photographers are buying the enthusiast model, then you've messed up your market segmentation, to the detriment of D500 sales.

All companies do this. Look back through Canon's lineup: the 60D was positioned lower down the market (in response the the 7D line being introduced above). This didn't work so the 70D went back further upmarket yet, a generation later, the T6s/760D had as much in common with a 60D as it did with a Rebel. Move on a generation and the T6S has been replaced by the the ~T7s~ 77D.

Companies constantly adjust their offerings to match the market. They don't tend to make them for people to 'upgrade' one generation to the next (they want you to upgrade to the next tier).

Link | Posted on Apr 13, 2017 at 19:18 UTC
On article Nikon D7500 vs Nikon D500: Which is better for you? (387 comments in total)
In reply to:

Chris2210: Here we have two cameras... one is a Nikon with a 20 megapixel sensor in the DX format. The other is a Nikon DX format camera sporting an image capture wafer capable of resolving at 20 megapixels. On is smaller and cheaper and the other is larger, more expensive and has a few more features. But which one is better?

There's only one way to find out! FIGHT!

I was so tempted to get a bit Harry Hill on the first slide, but then realised that a significant chunk of our audience wouldn't understand it.

Link | Posted on Apr 13, 2017 at 18:33 UTC
On article Nikon D7500 vs Nikon D500: Which is better for you? (387 comments in total)
In reply to:

Serban Claudiu: Nikon D500 anytime. D500 is the best APS-C on the market. Offers two memory cards, better autofocus, illuminated buttons, better speed. I even prefer Nikon D7100 with two card slots against Nikon D7500. It's too risky to photograph a wedding for example with one memory slot.

I'm pretty sure Nikon would want wedding photographers (or any professional) to buy the D500, not the cheaper enthusiast model.

Link | Posted on Apr 13, 2017 at 18:28 UTC
Total: 4801, showing: 21 – 40
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