Karroly

Lives in France Grenoble, France
Joined on Jan 13, 2009

Comments

Total: 2050, showing: 1 – 20
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In reply to:

Karroly: So, a camera without a viewfinder to frame and check focus ?
I'll come back when they design one...

Hot shoe viewfinders work with prime lenses and are available for a limited number of focal lengths. Forget the use of zoom lenses. "Zoom" viewfinders are very rare.
Also, guessing the distance works with a fair amount of depth of field. Forget the use of a 85mm F1.8 portrait lens, or even a 50mm F1.8 wide open.
So what is left available ? 35mm prime lens or shorter stopped down at F8 ?
Also, you need to use fully manual lenses with a mechanical aperture ring. These kind of lenses are not made by Sony and are available usually for Canon or Nikon as well. So, just grab an old Canon EOS EF-M. As its name suggests, it is an MF body with a split-image focusing screen and an EF mount...

Link | Posted on Apr 26, 2018 at 14:58 UTC

So, a camera without a viewfinder to frame and check focus ?
I'll come back when they design one...

Link | Posted on Apr 25, 2018 at 18:56 UTC as 4th comment | 3 replies
In reply to:

ZilverHaylide: I wonder if any of these technical wizards give any thought to what they are doing: With every "advance" in image manipulation and content-aware fill, they are diminishing the documentary and evidentiary value of photography. That wouldn't be a problem if the metadata of a digital image was guaranteed to truthfully represent the origins of the photograph and also record the occurence and specific nature of any subsequent manipulations -- but I don't believe that is currently the case, at least not on standard consumer-level cameras. Camera manufacturers must devise an untamperable system, available on ordinary consumer-level cameras and digital images, that restores confidence in the authenticity of the photograph.

dr.noise,
I agree, plus we can imagine a special type of memory card that is write-once, like CD-R or DVD-R. The pictures on the card cannot be tampered by nature and nostalgic photographers could store their cards in a shoe box like their old slides and negatives :-)

Link | Posted on Apr 24, 2018 at 09:02 UTC
In reply to:

BJL: Never mind the small size—why the 3:2 shape? The 4:3 shape dominates in both compact digital cameras and the stills from camera-phones (even if the screens are a far wider "HD" shape for the sake of video).

I doubt that the main target market for this printer is users of APS-C or 35mm format interchangeable lens cameras, which are about the only ones using 3:2 as the default image shape.

P. S. Medium format digital is 4:3 too, but I doubt many MF users are looking for such a printer.

BJL,
PhozoKozmos wrote "3:2 prints match 3:2 sensors", not me...
However, what does matter, is not the sensor ratio, but the ratio the user chooses to take the picture. I personally do not take pictures with a smartphone, but if I did, I would choose 16:9 for the reason I have given above. And friends of mine usually choose 16:9 too, because it matches the smartphone screen ratio. So, I think that 3:2 is a good compromise between users who shoot at the 4:3 native sensor ratio and those who shoot at the 16:9 screen ratio.

Link | Posted on Apr 21, 2018 at 23:35 UTC
In reply to:

Edmond Leung: Definitely will try it if it is less than $85.

You can try it even if it costs $2000. Buying it is another story... ;-)

Link | Posted on Apr 21, 2018 at 15:07 UTC
In reply to:

BJL: Never mind the small size—why the 3:2 shape? The 4:3 shape dominates in both compact digital cameras and the stills from camera-phones (even if the screens are a far wider "HD" shape for the sake of video).

I doubt that the main target market for this printer is users of APS-C or 35mm format interchangeable lens cameras, which are about the only ones using 3:2 as the default image shape.

P. S. Medium format digital is 4:3 too, but I doubt many MF users are looking for such a printer.

As I said before, I crop my pictures to match my TV format most of the time. But I never ever keep the format of the sensor for not wasting pixels. When I crop to something different from 16:9, this is to select a frame that enhances my subject.

Link | Posted on Apr 20, 2018 at 18:54 UTC
In reply to:

BJL: Never mind the small size—why the 3:2 shape? The 4:3 shape dominates in both compact digital cameras and the stills from camera-phones (even if the screens are a far wider "HD" shape for the sake of video).

I doubt that the main target market for this printer is users of APS-C or 35mm format interchangeable lens cameras, which are about the only ones using 3:2 as the default image shape.

P. S. Medium format digital is 4:3 too, but I doubt many MF users are looking for such a printer.

BJL,
"That shape made sense last century when people were printing snapshots from 36x24mm format film cameras, but I do not see that it makes sense with phone cameras"
And 4:3 made sense last century, too, when people were watching 4:3 CRT TV and monitors, and I do not see that it makes sense with the 16:9 smartphone screen. ;-)
Today, everyone uses devices (smartphone, TV, PC display) with a 16:9 screen.
That is why I take most of my pictures with this format, now...

Link | Posted on Apr 19, 2018 at 23:21 UTC
On article Samsung Galaxy S9+ sample gallery (76 comments in total)

Overal good pictures. But... I like pictures of cat and bearded men because they show what a sensor can do. When I look at pictures 6, 21 and 22 I know that smartphone still have some way to go to match the resolution of "real" cameras with bigger sensors, especially when light gets scarse...

Link | Posted on Apr 19, 2018 at 16:45 UTC as 14th comment
On article Samsung Galaxy S9+ sample gallery (76 comments in total)
In reply to:

Rich Evans: Amazing. With AI/computational advancements like this in a couple of years it will be replacing smaller sensors like 1 inch and Micro Four Thirds for those who do not need many lenses. Specially when those portrait modes come around.

Mastering Light,
"APSC lenses are FF size too"
I disagree...
I also can tell you that my Samsung NX11 APS-C body (123 x 87 x 40 mm) is just very slightly bigger than my OM-D E-M10 II body (120 x 83 x 47 mm).
"We are heading for almost everyone using a smartphone"
For sure, but since digital photography exists, I have never seen as many young tourists using "real" cameras in my town streets...

Link | Posted on Apr 19, 2018 at 16:35 UTC
On article Sony 'striping': here's the fix (753 comments in total)
In reply to:

NOWHITELENS: Hey Sony, can we have some stars with these stripes?

No, this will be the fix for their star-eater bodies only ... ;-)

Link | Posted on Apr 19, 2018 at 15:30 UTC
On article Sony 'striping': here's the fix (753 comments in total)
In reply to:

Franglais91: Could this be why Nikon haven't used on-sensor PDAF in their products except for the Nikon 1 series? My understanding:

1. Aprina patented the On-sensor PDAF idea
2. Nikon used it in the Nikon 1 series with sensor made by Aptina
3. Sony did a cross-patent agreement with Aptina
4. Sony implemented on-sensor PDAF in many sensors for mirrorless cameras

I imagine that Nikon were fully aware of the problem and chose to never implemented on-sensor PDAF in their higher-end cameras. It looks like Canon has a better solution with twin-pixel technology.

Simon,
I was commenting about your last sentence : "When Canikon release a serious FF mirrorless body, they will have no choice but to use some form of on sensor AF".
This "choice" will not be difficult as they already know how to do it with the Dual-Pixel technology used in their APS-C MILCs. That was my point. Unless you meant that the Dual-Pixel technology is not "serious" enough for a "serious" FF MILC... ;-)

Link | Posted on Apr 19, 2018 at 15:25 UTC
On article Sony 'striping': here's the fix (753 comments in total)
In reply to:

Franglais91: Could this be why Nikon haven't used on-sensor PDAF in their products except for the Nikon 1 series? My understanding:

1. Aprina patented the On-sensor PDAF idea
2. Nikon used it in the Nikon 1 series with sensor made by Aptina
3. Sony did a cross-patent agreement with Aptina
4. Sony implemented on-sensor PDAF in many sensors for mirrorless cameras

I imagine that Nikon were fully aware of the problem and chose to never implemented on-sensor PDAF in their higher-end cameras. It looks like Canon has a better solution with twin-pixel technology.

BlueBomberTurbo,
"DPAF is different than OSPDAF"
The design is different but it also uses the phase difference principle. Canon Dual-Pixel AF is another approch to do OSPDAF...
https://www.slrlounge.com/camera-tech-explained-canon-dual-pixel-autofocus/

Link | Posted on Apr 19, 2018 at 03:00 UTC
On article Sony 'striping': here's the fix (753 comments in total)
In reply to:

Franglais91: Could this be why Nikon haven't used on-sensor PDAF in their products except for the Nikon 1 series? My understanding:

1. Aprina patented the On-sensor PDAF idea
2. Nikon used it in the Nikon 1 series with sensor made by Aptina
3. Sony did a cross-patent agreement with Aptina
4. Sony implemented on-sensor PDAF in many sensors for mirrorless cameras

I imagine that Nikon were fully aware of the problem and chose to never implemented on-sensor PDAF in their higher-end cameras. It looks like Canon has a better solution with twin-pixel technology.

Simon,
Canon already uses on-sensor PDAF on their recent DSLRs (in live-view mode) and the EF-M bodies. This is called Dual-Pixel AF...

Link | Posted on Apr 18, 2018 at 23:46 UTC
On article Nikon dominates World Press Photo 2018 camera breakdown (379 comments in total)
In reply to:

camerosity: Take that, Nikon haters. It's not going away for a long, long time!!

@ThatCamFan,
I hope you are joking. Taking pictures of suffering people is merely the main characteristic of photo journalists because other people's pain and death is what sells well...

Link | Posted on Apr 16, 2018 at 23:20 UTC
On article Nikon dominates World Press Photo 2018 camera breakdown (379 comments in total)

"this is probably more an exercise in bragging rights than an accurate representation of camera company health"
Maybe these figures are just the demonstration that "old" photographers using "old" gear (understand DSLRs) are just more skilled and talented ? Their younger colleagues using the latest technology still having some way to go ?
I am curious to see the same kind of graph showing the participants ' age distribution..
...or, as the participants are pros who use their gear in tough, harsh environments, this is just a sign that MILC are not yet ruggedised and weather-sealed enough ?

Link | Posted on Apr 16, 2018 at 23:14 UTC as 77th comment
In reply to:

sharkcookie: quote "...you won't notice camera shortcomings as much as you'll notice that you hate your operating system."

I use for the word 'hate' for criminals, cancer and Donald Trump. If you feel hate for either iOS or Android your life must be pretty sad.

It looks to me that Trumps does hate a lot of things too... Journalists, to begin with.
And Trumps' face looks pretty sad as well...

Link | Posted on Apr 15, 2018 at 00:36 UTC
On article Tiny micro-camera sensor is self-powered by light (75 comments in total)
In reply to:

knight427: I'm confused. So they essentially built a solar panel behind the image sensor, which works because their image sensor is "leaky"??? Do all image sensors spill light like this?

@knight427,
Thank you to let me know that I was not paranoid enough... ;-)
I was not aware of this Terminator project...

Link | Posted on Apr 12, 2018 at 23:37 UTC
On article Tiny micro-camera sensor is self-powered by light (75 comments in total)
In reply to:

knight427: I'm confused. So they essentially built a solar panel behind the image sensor, which works because their image sensor is "leaky"??? Do all image sensors spill light like this?

IMHO, those type of sensors is intended for Big Brother so he can spread inexpensive, self-powered surveillance cameras all over the world. For him, the best image quality is not a must have...

Link | Posted on Apr 12, 2018 at 19:44 UTC
On article Tiny micro-camera sensor is self-powered by light (75 comments in total)
In reply to:

Horshack: Based on the laws of equivalence, a 1mm sensor powered by available light is equivalent to a full-frame sensor powered by a potato.

The variety does not matter, as long as it grows near a nuclear plant...

Link | Posted on Apr 12, 2018 at 19:38 UTC
In reply to:

Photoman: Sooo big and not a 2.8? Seems strange.

This is the first thing I noticed, too... ;-)
But this is an expensive lens, so it must be big...

Link | Posted on Apr 10, 2018 at 03:46 UTC
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