Steve Ives

Lives in United Kingdom London, United Kingdom
Works as a z/OS Systems Programmer
Joined on Aug 23, 2001
About me:

Sony DSC-F55 - Sold.
Sony DSC-F505V - Sold.
Canon EOS-10D - Sold.
Sony DSC-M1 - Sold
Canon EOS-1D Mk II - Sold
Nikon D100 - Sold
Canon 350D - Sold
Panasonic TZ7 - Sold

Sigma 100-300 f4 - sold
Sigma 12-24 - sold

Epson 2100 - Sold
Epson R2400 - Sold
Epson 7800

Comments

Total: 70, showing: 1 – 20
« First‹ Previous1234Next ›Last »
In reply to:

Sirandar: You have to wonder what this article has to do with photography.
There is some implication that a photographer did this.

It is incredibly unlikely that this van was left there by anybody who would call themselves a photographer.

If we had real news instead of fake news we would know if the van even had plates (probably not) and if the VIN number was traced, or even if the van was reported stolen. In Canada, out of province people routinely buy old junker vans to travel the west coast to save $$. When they no longer work they are abandoned.

Because being an actual reporter is no longer a viable occupation, there is nobody to "report" these little details.

Um, relevance to photography? Incredibly popular photography location potentially spoilt? Seems relevant to me.

Link | Posted on Mar 15, 2017 at 17:25 UTC
In reply to:

Steve Ives: I can see this bing useful for people producing training videos e.g. Golf, skateboarding, etc etc and who, previously, have had to press friends and relatives into action to follow them around with a camera.

Arastoo - if you can't formulate a coherent reply, then don't bother. Setting up straw men as arguments just to knock them hem down seems to be the main sort of argument these days, as is thr "I don't have a use for this so why on Earth did they make it?"

Link | Posted on Mar 6, 2017 at 13:07 UTC
In reply to:

Steve Ives: I can see this bing useful for people producing training videos e.g. Golf, skateboarding, etc etc and who, previously, have had to press friends and relatives into action to follow them around with a camera.

Not sure you've thought this through Arastoo - people who produce any sort of tutorial (for example) when they need photos or videos of themselves already have a use - this may just facilitate that.

If your needs vary, then I'm very happy for you, but don't assume that your requirements are everyone's requirements.

Link | Posted on Mar 5, 2017 at 10:02 UTC

I can see this bing useful for people producing training videos e.g. Golf, skateboarding, etc etc and who, previously, have had to press friends and relatives into action to follow them around with a camera.

Link | Posted on Mar 4, 2017 at 15:42 UTC as 15th comment | 13 replies
In reply to:

cosinaphile: how often do divers go below 15 -20 feet? a 60 foot dive is extraordinary and rare

silly depth rating silly to take an iso 20 phone with a 17 .5 sqmm sensor... the smallest anywhere
,
,
,
,
,
,
,
,
,

into the depths

Novice divers in the UK are limited to about 60ft. The usual for scuba dives is about 30m/100ft. Advanced divers can go up to 50m/ 160ft.

At 6m and less, boyancy control is a pain, due to the relatively large changes in pressure that asmall change in depth can produce.

Link | Posted on Jan 27, 2017 at 17:02 UTC

If you put the bits in a bag of rice, would that get the water out?

Link | Posted on Nov 14, 2016 at 12:24 UTC as 14th comment
On article Throwback Thursday: Canon EOS D30 (134 comments in total)
In reply to:

turvyT: The idea of recovering old cameras is fun, thanks for it. But certainly the anecdote about what you called BDG's is neither nice nor fun. "Schadenfreude", pleasure because someone who did not do anything mean to you spilled wine on his own camera? Nasty feelings there. And the footnotes...

Lighten up. We all know exactly what he means.

Link | Posted on Oct 20, 2016 at 11:39 UTC
In reply to:

Steve Ives: These sort of algorithms are impressive - I can ask my phone for pictures of 'birds' and it's scarily right. I can also ask for 'eagle' or 'owl' and it gets that right. Ditto for 'dog' and 'cat' although I can't imagine how it can tell them apart - neural network perhaps. Very useful for a quick search.

Austin - 100% of the images on my iPhone don't have captions, yet the built-in search (not, as far as I am aware, powered by google) is still capable of identifying the images.

Link | Posted on Sep 28, 2016 at 06:28 UTC
In reply to:

Alex Permit: Useful description to use in search. But as captions they add NOTHING to the photo. What is the purpose of reading a brief description of what you can obviously see? Useful captions add information or insights that are not in, or at least not obvious in the image.

The captions are *purely* for search purposes. They're not there to tell you what is in the photo once you've found it.

Link | Posted on Sep 28, 2016 at 06:25 UTC
In reply to:

Steve Ives: These sort of algorithms are impressive - I can ask my phone for pictures of 'birds' and it's scarily right. I can also ask for 'eagle' or 'owl' and it gets that right. Ditto for 'dog' and 'cat' although I can't imagine how it can tell them apart - neural network perhaps. Very useful for a quick search.

Austin - I assure you that my photos don't have caption.

Link | Posted on Sep 27, 2016 at 17:02 UTC
In reply to:

jdc562: Are the captions for blind people? Captions that state the obvious are useless.

Not for blind people - the idea of automatically captioning the photos is not to tell you what's in the picture once your've found it, but to be able to use the highlighted words in the caption (red, car, dog, beach etc) to search for photos which match those descriptions. E.g. a search could be 'red car on beach'. It's not to tell you that the picture you are currently looking at is a red car on a beach.

Link | Posted on Sep 27, 2016 at 12:47 UTC
In reply to:

Lee Jay: "Anyone who manages a large image library knows how important keywording and captioning are for categorizing and keeping things searchable."

I have around 400,000 images, and they aren't keyworded. And I can find them.

But if you're looking for a picture of the red car you saw once, and you can't remember where or when you saw it...

Link | Posted on Sep 27, 2016 at 12:33 UTC

These sort of algorithms are impressive - I can ask my phone for pictures of 'birds' and it's scarily right. I can also ask for 'eagle' or 'owl' and it gets that right. Ditto for 'dog' and 'cat' although I can't imagine how it can tell them apart - neural network perhaps. Very useful for a quick search.

Link | Posted on Sep 27, 2016 at 09:13 UTC as 18th comment | 10 replies
In reply to:

Lee Jay: "Anyone who manages a large image library knows how important keywording and captioning are for categorizing and keeping things searchable."

I have around 400,000 images, and they aren't keyworded. And I can find them.

Each photo is in a folder. The folder name consists of the keywords for the photo.

Link | Posted on Sep 27, 2016 at 09:11 UTC
On article Modern Mirrorless: Canon EOS M5 Review (1627 comments in total)
In reply to:

RubberDials: It looks like we will all now be in loco parentis, burping Canon users getting over-excited about their first proper mirrorless.

Expect the 'EVF is no substitute for a good optical viewfinder' crowd to start turning up to work with their trousers on backwards and odd shoes. :)

EVF is no match for optical viewfinder. Digital is no match for film. MP3s are no match for CDs. CDs are no match for vinyl...

Link | Posted on Sep 15, 2016 at 14:59 UTC
On article ESPN publishes iPhone 7 Plus photos from US Open (341 comments in total)
In reply to:

Mister Roboto: More marketing BS as always. Anybody with $50 P&S camera + courtside game ticket or access to these POV will be able to produce better if not similar results.

If that's all you've got, then fine. Hopefully this $50 P&S is waterproof?

Link | Posted on Sep 14, 2016 at 11:40 UTC
On article ESPN publishes iPhone 7 Plus photos from US Open (341 comments in total)
In reply to:

BeaverTerror: These photos are absolutely terrible both technically and compositionally. Poor dynamic range, skewed horizon in first photo (intentional? dubious); a snapshot of some lady’s handbag? Third photo most of image dominated by a wall of black, and the player’s shirt already blown! Fourth photo “dude with towel in pain” (towel blown); fourth photo white shirt blown and dark shirts black (seeing a trend here?); next photo “dude with glass covering half of face”; etc...

The iPhone photography advertising campaign Apple ran a while back had some compositionally great photos gimped by technical limitations. At lease those were decent to look at from the vantage point of a train speeding past.

These photos are absolutely awful. It looks like they handed the phones to a couple of towel boys. This is a dramatic event. Anybody (apparently not) with any crap camera can get good shots from a courtside location. It's amazing how the photographers have failed at even this.

I suspect that there are many people who haven't purchased a 700d, or the Nikon equivalent etc, because of the capabilities of their smartphone, and who would miss the 'other' cameraphone benefits such as easy video, slow-motion, simple social sharing (Facebook, Instagram etc etc). So for some people, an iPhone probably has replaced a D-SLR.

Link | Posted on Sep 14, 2016 at 07:01 UTC
On article ESPN publishes iPhone 7 Plus photos from US Open (341 comments in total)
In reply to:

Francis Sawyer: This totally makes up for the iPhone 7 being a music player with no audio output.

I'd love Tim Cook to come onstage next year and say "This ISN"T the best iPhone we've ever made - last year's was better...". I think thier marketing in general is good - their adverts concentrate on how it feels to use their products (or at least they attempt to), what you can do with them and the 'lifestyle' aspect, rather than bland technical facts. Their success says they must be doing something right, and the answer is not that they appeal only to stupid people.

Link | Posted on Sep 13, 2016 at 14:31 UTC
On article ESPN publishes iPhone 7 Plus photos from US Open (341 comments in total)
In reply to:

Mister Roboto: More marketing BS as always. Anybody with $50 P&S camera + courtside game ticket or access to these POV will be able to produce better if not similar results.

Steelski - no-one said it had. The point is though is that an iPhone (or any recent smartphone) packs in a lot of advanced photo/video features in a remarkably small package. The underlying assertion that a $50 P&S would be a better option is belied by said P&S's lack of features and the fact that you don't take it everywhere.

Link | Posted on Sep 13, 2016 at 13:38 UTC
On article ESPN publishes iPhone 7 Plus photos from US Open (341 comments in total)
In reply to:

Mister Roboto: More marketing BS as always. Anybody with $50 P&S camera + courtside game ticket or access to these POV will be able to produce better if not similar results.

Which $50 P&S does time-lapse, 4K video and 10x slow-motion with wi-fi and GPS?

Link | Posted on Sep 13, 2016 at 11:12 UTC
Total: 70, showing: 1 – 20
« First‹ Previous1234Next ›Last »