Greg Ohio

Joined on Dec 27, 2017

Comments

Total: 419, showing: 1 – 20
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Problem is that it overheats halfway through transformation

Link | Posted on Aug 10, 2022 at 14:28 UTC as 41st comment
On article DPReview TV: Sigma 24mm F1.4 DG DN Art Review (46 comments in total)

The Sony GM works with the breathing correction in recent bodies.

Link | Posted on Aug 8, 2022 at 13:39 UTC as 13th comment | 1 reply
On article DPReview TV: The best lenses for Sony E-Mount (241 comments in total)
In reply to:

BackToNature1: I posted before that some Sony manager stated that the ZV-E10 “had the largest number of reservations ever among the mirrorless interchangeable-lens cameras released by Sony”. Rest assured most folks are NOT looking to spend much on Lens either.

So in light of today's economic turmoil, there out to be an Best Value Picks for Sony E mount. Kit lens are mostly trash. IMO

Canon and Nikon's kit lenses are usually very good. Sony should really resign theirs. A useful kit lens lowers the investment to get started with a system.

Link | Posted on Aug 7, 2022 at 19:58 UTC
On article Panasonic Lumix DC-GH6 review (662 comments in total)
In reply to:

MrBrightSide: But how close does it get me to the gorgeous look of an Alexa? Is it 50 percent as beautiful? 80 percent? 99 percent?

80 percent. It is very good. Probably will be Netflix certified. But, Arri just has that little bit better color that makes the difference between Netflix and Hollywood.

Link | Posted on Aug 5, 2022 at 18:42 UTC
On article Panasonic Lumix DC-GH6 review (662 comments in total)

An S6H, please? S5 size. Video capabilities of the GH6, S1H, and FX3? Internal 6K raw. Phase detection autofocus comparable to Sony, Nikon, or Canon.

Link | Posted on Aug 5, 2022 at 18:38 UTC as 20th comment
On article Panasonic Lumix DC-GH6 review (662 comments in total)

Anyone have a good comparison to the FX3?

Link | Posted on Aug 4, 2022 at 19:16 UTC as 46th comment
On article Panasonic Lumix DC-GH6 review (662 comments in total)
In reply to:

Mortal Lion: Which photographer in his right mind will get a GH6 anyway. Get and S5 instead.

That's a great question. The GH6 is higher-specced in almost every way. But, the S5 has 4 times the sensor area. I wonder which actually does better, and in what conditions.

Link | Posted on Aug 4, 2022 at 19:15 UTC
In reply to:

SteveNunez: The end of hobby drones is near. Big companies will have sole use of them for delivery, surveillance, mapping, rescue etc. It's sad that hobbyists created these things and now have been "ruled' out. Parks and beaches don't want or allow them- so where do you fly- in a remote desert in Nevada- give me a break- the end is near for these things.
I've been a drone hobbyist since the very beginning and this is most disappointing.
Are the tons of older drones that don't have RFID going to be grounded- many can't be fitted with RFID systems- who will sell them- someone will be making $$$ on these "retrofit' systems...what happens if it malfunctions?
Freedom is being taken away in every facet of life.....bring back the 1970's!

Yes, but everybody can see the real-time location of the operator without the involvement of law enforcement. That might not tell them who you are, but when they have a gun, it doesn't matter.

Link | Posted on Aug 3, 2022 at 14:50 UTC
In reply to:

BackToNature1: "the court said that the US Government "has exclusive sovereignty of airspace of the United States,"

Ah actually no, each state has exclusive sovereignty of their airspace. They just allow the US government to use it.

Article I:

"The Congress shall have Power...To regulate Commerce with foreign Nations, and among the several States..."

This is the view upheld by the courts many times, including this one.

Link | Posted on Aug 3, 2022 at 13:37 UTC
In reply to:

photoaddict: The ruling is common sense.

We ID all vehicles and flying objects. Why should drones be exempted?

None of those IDs invites all people to engage you right then and there. All they do is allow authorities to reach you later. If Remote ID did just that, it would be fine.

Link | Posted on Aug 2, 2022 at 22:38 UTC

I'll bet a drone operator is attacked within the first 30 days of this taking effect.

Link | Posted on Aug 2, 2022 at 22:35 UTC as 21st comment
In reply to:

Jason: So let me get this straight. By 9/2023, all existing drones (and/or remotes) must be retrofitted with some sort of RID broadcast device, or they're essentially garbage? What about DIY drones? What about drones under 250 grams? Can noncompliant drones still be flown on private property or under a certain altitude? What about in remote locations away from people and structures?

I have an original Mavic Air that still meets my needs, so I don't plan to upgrade unless my batteries die and I can't get replacements. I'm registered with the FAA like a good little citizen. I'm guessing that the drone is physically capable of broadcasting the necessary info, but is DJI likely to issue a firmware update on such "old" gear?

DJI will implement it in firmware where they can, and provide add-on hardware where they can't.

Link | Posted on Aug 2, 2022 at 22:33 UTC
In reply to:

SteveNunez: The end of hobby drones is near. Big companies will have sole use of them for delivery, surveillance, mapping, rescue etc. It's sad that hobbyists created these things and now have been "ruled' out. Parks and beaches don't want or allow them- so where do you fly- in a remote desert in Nevada- give me a break- the end is near for these things.
I've been a drone hobbyist since the very beginning and this is most disappointing.
Are the tons of older drones that don't have RFID going to be grounded- many can't be fitted with RFID systems- who will sell them- someone will be making $$$ on these "retrofit' systems...what happens if it malfunctions?
Freedom is being taken away in every facet of life.....bring back the 1970's!

My car's license plate doesn't tell anyone and everyone precisely where I am when I'm not in it.

Link | Posted on Aug 2, 2022 at 22:32 UTC

Around here, people want to shoot down drones, based on the notion that they own any airspace within sight of them or their property. This will give them the ability to shoot pilots.

Link | Posted on Aug 2, 2022 at 17:19 UTC as 30th comment | 3 replies
In reply to:

biggercountry: We live in an entrenched smartphone/social media world, with all that entails (and which has been meticulously documented)... and now some are worried about the privacy ramifications of a remote ID on a drone?

@Gannon, that's somewhat true, but not in any way the same as providing exact location to everyone, in real time. Your phone doesn't even transmit its GPS location unless you specifically permit it, or you call 911. The location information they sell is much less precise (based on the tower you connected to) and is not real-time.

Link | Posted on Aug 2, 2022 at 17:14 UTC
In reply to:

Greg Ohio: The requirement that Remote ID provide the location of the operator places them in danger. A criminal intending to hide their activity could use that feature to eliminate potential witnesses. So could corrupt police.

The DOJ and FAA don't have the ability to protect pilots, even if they had the inclination.

It's a deal-breaker for me.

Criminals will be able to use Remote ID to eliminate witnesses.

Imagine a large-scale drug deal. The criminals are careful to ensure there are no witnesses on the ground. But, as the transaction is concluding, one of them says, "let me check for drones." Using an app on their phone, they check for any nearby transmitting Remote ID. Then, use it to locate the operator on the ground.

Link | Posted on Aug 2, 2022 at 17:10 UTC
In reply to:

biggercountry: We live in an entrenched smartphone/social media world, with all that entails (and which has been meticulously documented)... and now some are worried about the privacy ramifications of a remote ID on a drone?

The GPS on your phone doesn't disclose your location unless you specifically permit it.

Link | Posted on Aug 2, 2022 at 17:00 UTC
In reply to:

Greg Ohio: Calling it a "license plate" is ludicrous. If someone observes the license plate on your car, all they have is the option of contacting police, and making a complaint, which police will verify before they engage you. Criminals are very unlikely to pursue that path.

This is more like a GPS stalking tracker that can be placed on your car without even touching it.

I have no problem with law enforcement access, as long as there are safeguards to prevent abuse. But, remote ID, as currently specified, allows anyone to see the operator's location in real time.

It used to be possible to ask the BMV the name and address of the owner of a license plate. After many tragic outcomes, the states stopped it. Now, the feds are going to give out our location in real time?

Link | Posted on Aug 2, 2022 at 16:58 UTC

Calling it a "license plate" is ludicrous. If someone observes the license plate on your car, all they have is the option of contacting police, and making a complaint, which police will verify before they engage you. Criminals are very unlikely to pursue that path.

This is more like a GPS stalking tracker that can be placed on your car without even touching it.

Link | Posted on Aug 2, 2022 at 15:31 UTC as 39th comment | 3 replies

The requirement that Remote ID provide the location of the operator places them in danger. A criminal intending to hide their activity could use that feature to eliminate potential witnesses. So could corrupt police.

The DOJ and FAA don't have the ability to protect pilots, even if they had the inclination.

It's a deal-breaker for me.

Link | Posted on Aug 2, 2022 at 15:21 UTC as 40th comment | 3 replies
Total: 419, showing: 1 – 20
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