Ultan

Joined on May 11, 2012

Comments

Total: 23, showing: 1 – 20
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On article Sony FE 100mm F2.8 STF bokeh demystified (299 comments in total)
In reply to:

Ultan: Why don't they put a transparent grayscale LCD where the iris would otherwise be? Then you could set not only f-stop but also the gradient width between the central clear aperture and the opaque surrounding region. Anybody who wants to patent it, be my guest, but contact me to put my name on the application.

I'm easy with terms, up-front fee $10K, $10 royalty per unit, or let's talk.

Thanks. I would have figured the screen-door effect wouldn't happen, that it would be out of focus and just make it a bit blurrier. B/W should be smoother than color LCD. With sufficiently high resolution, perhaps thin (under 10 micron) circles/arcs as pixels in a bulls-eye pattern it might work.

Other ideas: glass iris blades with gradient edges, maybe made similarly to Sony's apodizing element.

something something electrowetting

Two flats with index-matched oil between them, a stretched flexible membrane separating the oil into two flat volumes, the oil in one of those pigmented with a dark gray colloidal suspension, the other side clear. Varying the amount of clear oil from 100% to ~60% bends the membrane from being entirely pressed against the gray-side flat (open) to just having a small central region against / close to that flat (closed aperture). The curvature of the membrane where it is not pressed against the flat gives a catenary gradient, close to parabolic.

Link | Posted on Feb 18, 2017 at 15:03 UTC
In reply to:

Ultan: So much idiocy in the comments. The winning photo does not glorify anything.

#2 on the other hand, gives an entirely false impression of what happened and is happening with the (only violent criminal) Black Lives Matter (unless killed by another Black criminal). It glorifies a violent movement based on lies that has forced innocent people out of their homes, cost hundreds of retirees their life savings in Ferguson, Missouri by making their houses unsaleable, killed cops and made the rest reluctant to arrest Blacks, resulting in thousands more murders of Blacks by Blacks.

Shootings they protest were nearly all justified, but the BLM mob lies. Black officers are more likely to pull the trigger in such incidents, White suspects are more likely to be shot in similar circumstances. The photo lies, implying cops are violent and Blacks are peaceful, cops are cowardly and Blacks are brave. Truth is Blacks are over 25 times more likely to attack a White than the reverse (DOJ victim survey).

1. Nah, no TV.
2. Is that technically stereotyping or "othering"?

Link | Posted on Feb 18, 2017 at 03:57 UTC
On article Sony FE 100mm F2.8 STF bokeh demystified (299 comments in total)

Why don't they put a transparent grayscale LCD where the iris would otherwise be? Then you could set not only f-stop but also the gradient width between the central clear aperture and the opaque surrounding region. Anybody who wants to patent it, be my guest, but contact me to put my name on the application.

I'm easy with terms, up-front fee $10K, $10 royalty per unit, or let's talk.

Link | Posted on Feb 18, 2017 at 03:26 UTC as 31st comment | 3 replies

So much idiocy in the comments. The winning photo does not glorify anything.

#2 on the other hand, gives an entirely false impression of what happened and is happening with the (only violent criminal) Black Lives Matter (unless killed by another Black criminal). It glorifies a violent movement based on lies that has forced innocent people out of their homes, cost hundreds of retirees their life savings in Ferguson, Missouri by making their houses unsaleable, killed cops and made the rest reluctant to arrest Blacks, resulting in thousands more murders of Blacks by Blacks.

Shootings they protest were nearly all justified, but the BLM mob lies. Black officers are more likely to pull the trigger in such incidents, White suspects are more likely to be shot in similar circumstances. The photo lies, implying cops are violent and Blacks are peaceful, cops are cowardly and Blacks are brave. Truth is Blacks are over 25 times more likely to attack a White than the reverse (DOJ victim survey).

Link | Posted on Feb 17, 2017 at 00:42 UTC as 3rd comment | 2 replies
In reply to:

stevo23: Surreal photo. Shouldn't be glorified though.

@polarabbit If you look at the main site you'll see that there were dozens of more gory shots that didn't win, the Pakistan bombing with 70 dead, for example.

Link | Posted on Feb 17, 2017 at 00:14 UTC
In reply to:

Ruy Penalva: That is a shame. Where we are? This award is mixed with blood of prejudice against Russia people. Too bad!

"Photographer" is not a race. The "divine right of cameramen" attitude is bound to annoy some people, and being in the pay of some big propaganda outlet doesn't usually help.

Link | Posted on Feb 16, 2017 at 23:42 UTC
On article Flat metalenses now work with a range of colors (43 comments in total)

"This method for dispersion engineering can be used to design various ultrathin components with a desired performance,” said Zhujun Shi, a PhD student in the Capasso Lab and co-first author of the paper.

“This platform is based on single step lithography and is compatible with high throughput manufacturing technique such as nano-imprinting.”

Link | Posted on Feb 9, 2017 at 20:53 UTC as 3rd comment
On article Flat metalenses now work with a range of colors (43 comments in total)
In reply to:

bubblyboo: Visible light spectrum is around 300nm in total. This only works for a 60nm block . Still a long ways away.

BEKippe, the dichroic prisms would have to be lens objective size, so much heavier than regular optics of the same diameter. 3-sensor cameras have prisms that work after the light has been mostly focused, just before the sensors which are typically smaller than 1" nominal (~1/3 in actual). The difference in prism weight could easily be over 100x.

Link | Posted on Feb 9, 2017 at 20:50 UTC
On article CES 2017: Hands-on with Nikon D5600 (322 comments in total)

It's no exaggeration to say that of all the models of camera in the world, this is one of them.

Link | Posted on Jan 6, 2017 at 22:53 UTC as 11th comment | 1 reply
In reply to:

junk1: and knives are weapons, so ban them too? What else would a knife ever be used for?

Britain has long been that nuts. There, "knife crime" means having any knife or other cutting tool over 3 inches long or that has a fixed blade or a lockable blade or which could be used as a weapon. Naturally, this only disarms the law-abiding public, meanwhile an African Muslim decapitated a British veteran with a machete on the public street and no one could stop him. No right to self-defense at all, even in your own home against armed men breaking in. That's what they have planned for the US -- disarmed citizenry and importing violent criminals who are effectively above the law. Sweden is even worse. I hope that they will soon be liberated and rid of invaders, clearly they're under enemy occupation.

Link | Posted on Oct 27, 2016 at 16:14 UTC
In reply to:

Nixyz: How is it an abuse of power if being on Facebook is not mandatory in the first place?

Because Facebook was funded by In-Q-Tel, the venture capital arm of the CIA. Because Facebook does in fact have power, which they use to limit public discourse more than the government may legally do directly, and that power which they abuse is ultimately derived from government. Because Facebook is a publicly chartered corporation whose owners get immunity from lawsuits. Because Facebook is a publicly traded corporation with a fiduciary duty to its shareholders not to chase off users or to assume liability for what its users post, which it does when it takes control over what they post. Because Facebook is effectively a monopoly in its market, so is subject to stricter regulation than normal businesses.

Link | Posted on Oct 27, 2016 at 15:42 UTC

The possibilities for trading frame rate for HDR and focus stacking are very interesting. Focus change at such rates will require a very different mechanism than in today's lenses, though, with the inertia of the lens group balanced by springs and position set with something like a voice coil with position feedback. It should be possible to read out only the regions that are anticipated to be in focus on most frames, which would make it quite a bit faster. Adding fast in-body stabilization would allow additional effects such as stacking image plane movements (tilt, shift) and perhaps even 3D (with special lenses) by moving the sensor between the right and left eye positions rapidly.

Lots of RAM is a must for such a camera, 32GB should be considered a minimum. The new high-speed non-volatile RAM that is supposed to be available soon would be great for such a camera.

Link | Posted on Oct 27, 2016 at 15:23 UTC as 10th comment | 1 reply
On article Ricoh teases spring 2016 full-frame Pentax DSLR debut (520 comments in total)

In-body stabilization with a wide range of movement that allows movements (tilt / swing / shift) for architectural use, rapid focal plane forward/back movement for focus stacking, astro-tracking, video frame-rates for multi-parameter stacking (e.g. high and low exposure for each of three focus shots for post-processing depth of field control and HDR , 6 shots in 1/10th sec.).

Advanced photon-counting sensor with flip-chip, thinned BSI, TSV, bonded to analog amp and digital preprocessor chip with an amp, memory buffer and preprocessor for each few thousand pixels, giving extremely fast readouts (and likely the ability to do other tricks.) Free-space (~1 -2 cm) optical sensor output and inductive power to sensor for internally wire-free sensor operation.

Mirrorless or semi -mirrorless design, (mostly transparent but retractable mirror design). Totally open, all-function remote control system. GPS / intertial tracker/ heading / elevation / auto time. Scr. tilt, HP jack, wifi, mono ver.

Link | Posted on Sep 22, 2015 at 18:11 UTC as 16th comment | 3 replies
On article Canon EF-S 10-18mm F4.5-5.6 sample gallery (99 comments in total)
In reply to:

Valiant Thor: A nice value for $300 however I would have liked Canon to upgrade the mounting plate to a more substantial plate of pre-famulated amulite surmounted by a malleable logarithmic casing in such a way that the gold spurving contacts ran in a direct line with the panametric fan. Also, the hydrocoptic marzul vanes should have been fitted to the ambaphascient wain shaft so that side fumbling is effectively prevented. The main focus ring should have been of the normal lotus-odeltoid type placed in panendurmic semi-bulloid slots of the stator with the threads being connected by a non-reversible tremmy pipe to the differential girdle spring on the up-end of the grammeters. Oh well, maybe the next version . . .

There is much to what you say, but I'd like to add that a chalcogenide-based frammis knurl volution on the forward rotical assembly would also have made it easily 20% more cromulent.

Link | Posted on Jul 30, 2014 at 19:06 UTC

So at a bit less than double the price of the Pentax 645z, you get the same size sensor, no camera, half the frames per second, and about 8 stops lower maximum ISO. Oh, and less than half the pixels on the screen.

Or for the same price as the Hasselblad, you can get a Pentax with better engineering, better metering, better autofocus, better low-light performance, beter proceesor, better ergonomics, everything integrated SLR-style, and two or three new lenses designed for digital.

Wait, let me think about this....

Link | Posted on Jul 25, 2014 at 22:07 UTC as 31st comment | 5 replies
In reply to:

Gary Yelland: the lens is not that fast, no gps, no wifi zoom range is ok but not stella, so to sell this one the images would have to be amazing and superfast startup and shoot time.

Gripe, whine, moan. WTF is with the commenters here?

This is an incredible set of features for the money. The zoom range is perfect, it's at least as fast a lens as the competition even in some much more expensive cameras, it doesn't skimp on the wide end, focuses close, and it has an optically stabilized telephoto long enough for any common use. AA batteries are great, available everywhere and cheap enough to have spare sets. It's light and pocketable. The back-illuminated sensor will be sensitive for its size, and downsized to 1-4Mp it should have good image quality even in marginal light. Bigger sensors are always nice, but for $250 with a decent lens this is amazing. It has all the most important features in a total package of usability that has no real competition at this price. I hope the shutter lag is low and the focus is reasonably fast, but even if the camera is mediocre aside from the reported features, it's still going to sell very well.

Link | Posted on Aug 13, 2012 at 06:58 UTC
In reply to:

wkay: the majority of these pictures basically stink, why do I need this camera? maybe half the problem is the poster playing around with camera raw with no idea what he's doing

delete

Link | Posted on Jul 5, 2012 at 06:27 UTC
In reply to:

ProfHankD: This is actually a huge deal. Circuitry under a micro/nano-fab device is not a standard technology and this is "to increase the production capacity" -- I wasn't aware anybody was doing this in large-scale commercial application. Very cool, Sony!

Placing circuitry under sensors allows for significantly smarter circuitry per sensing element, and I've been working on smarter control to go under sensors for about a decade. Basically, the idea is to build a parallel supercomputer under a chip covered in sensing elements. Here's a 1-page summary:

http://aggregate.org/KYARCH/white20060808.pdf

The reason this is more important for phone sensors is that the circuitry is a larger fraction of the sensing element size with tiny pixels. You also need higher amplification which makes noise more of an issue and having good processing under pixels means less routing of touchy analog signals. Oh yeah... with smaller die sizes, they also can better tolerate yield problems during development.

Here's Sony's own technical backgrounder on the subject:
"Sony's Stacked CMOS Image Sensor Solves All Existing Problems in One Stroke"
http://www.sony.net/Products/SC-HP/cx_news/vol68/pdf/sideview_vol68.pdf
Key points - with fragile thinned back-illuminated sensors already needing a bonded silicon support substrate for mechanical reasons, it's a good idea to use that silicon area for something useful.
*65nm logic coming out this month, 45nm in the future
*Benefits: higher frame-rates, higher sensitivity, lower noise, more pixels, higher dynamic range, built-in DSP functions, lower costs, easier semiconductor processing customized for both sensor and logic without the usual compromises, quicker design-to-production cycles
*first bonded-logic chip coming out this month will be a 1/3" 13Mpixel sensor with RGBW pixels and "HDR movie" mode which improves color in brightly-lit scenes.

Link | Posted on Jul 4, 2012 at 19:53 UTC
In reply to:

Jogger: the resolving power will be limited by the lens methinks, even in the samples provided, the 100% are useless except for surveillance

gasdive - no, the resolution is limited by the sizes of the individual lenses, not the size of the whole board, so your resolution would be more on the order of arcminutes than arcseconds. They are using 1 big lens rather than the conventional camera-array setup for just this reason. (Over long distances the fluctuating distortions in the atmosphere are the limiting factor, anyway. With sufficient framerates and processing this can actually be turned into an advantage.) The real problem with high resolution cameras is the vast amounts of data that have to be stored and processed. 1 gigapixel x 8 bits x 30frames/s (which is just an 11x11 array of quad-HD (QFHD) cellphone cameras) = about 30 gigabytes per second raw data, 3.7TB/hr - which can be reduced by a factor of 10 or more for storage, but each byte needs hundreds of operations done on it, so that's on the order of teraflops. Even very power-efficient processors still will need hundreds of watts.

Link | Posted on Jul 1, 2012 at 18:35 UTC
In reply to:

K_Photo_Teach: What I see here is new technology that will improve low light performance regardless of whether it is put into a camera or a DSLR.

WIN WIN

But it shows that the camera phone market is driving the innovation. Between this and the Nokia 808 who knows what the future will bring? Imagine the Nokia 808 with great low light performance?? It already rivals Full Frame DSLRs in resolution. Take a look here:

http://www.gsmarena.com/pureview_blind_test-review-773p3.php

limlh - This could benefit large sensors eventually. This gives the possibility of having many more amplifiers and even ADCs and low-level digital processors per pixel. With current technology the number of amplifiers scales with the length of the longer edge of the sensor. With a bonded chip, it can scale with the area of the sensor and also use much shorter and more uniform length connections. This could lead to lower readout noise with faster framerates.

Link | Posted on Jul 1, 2012 at 17:59 UTC
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