Twong

Lives in United States OH, United States
Joined on Sep 21, 2006

Comments

Total: 56, showing: 1 – 20
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Suggesting not to try taking pictures of the eclipse was probably a good intention but a wrong suggestion for photographers. Instead, it would be more helpful to suggest unusual lighting conditions that would result from the eclipse.

Link | Posted on Jul 21, 2017 at 15:21 UTC as 38th comment | 1 reply
In reply to:

Spectro: The amateur photographers bough the amazon chinesse knockoff lightings/strobes and the pro got the name brand. When the pro saw the amateur getting as good of a shot, they too got some knock-off to save money, end of bowen and other. I know quite a few switching to Godox as the go to portable solution.

I agree Chinese company are good at knock-off as they are the one commission to make them anyways. But innovation and customers support is really bad. I got Chinese products, I had to call main land china and got hung up. The other was a home camera door bell. Chat support was a fake screen with one one answering,...

Buying future electronic product might be dicy, but that is where it is heading toward. Just better hope it works. But China universities is getting better, westerners can't rest on their laurels either.

Nothing is sacred and no company (or any person) can sit on their laurels. Constant update and innovation are the primary drivers for staying relevant. Many companies started with a very humble beginning, Honda for example.

Link | Posted on Jul 18, 2017 at 13:32 UTC

It looks just like the cheap L-bracket I bought from Amazon. The color is different though. I have been using these cheap L-brackets for many years on different bodies. No sign of wear and tear yet. I think I only paid $11 for the first one.

Link | Posted on Jul 13, 2017 at 17:38 UTC as 23rd comment
In reply to:

J Parker: Some of us are hesitant about any lens that isn't auto focus.

A while back, I observed old footage of photographers shooting Muhammad Ali. Although all the photographers had were manual focus lenses, not only were they focusing at lightning speed, they were focusing as if the lens was a natural extension of their hands (think of a piano player playing hundreds of notes without looking at the keys). I realized that if you've handled, focused and adjusted a lens hundreds of times, the lens became so intuitive that you could literally compose and focus as if it were second nature.

Although I was pretty content with my AF glass, I decided to try shooting manual focus exclusively. At first it was an extremely slow process -- and then I crossed a point where without zone focusing, I could follow and shoot even rapidly moving subjects with no issues. Yes, I mean no missed shots.

Develop the skill and learn the nuances of a MF lens. It will take your photography to another level.

I started out using manual focus decades ago and was reasonably good at it. I resisted buying AF lens until 2000, the year I bought my first AF lens. It is sad that I have lost that ability to reliably do manual focus now. I still do that for macro though. I cannot say I am a better or worse photographer because my style also changed over time.

Link | Posted on Jul 11, 2017 at 15:41 UTC

I have to agree that it is elegant, but low on practicality apparently. Knowing that it is a Leica, the MSRP is uncharacteristically low. Still not something I would spend money on. A work-in-progress imo, but nevertheless moving in the right direction for an old brand name.

Link | Posted on Jul 10, 2017 at 15:35 UTC as 38th comment
On article Sigma sd Quattro H real world samples gallery (107 comments in total)

Excellent sample images! Very natural looking. Very much like to see comparison with Pentax Pixel Shift technology.

Link | Posted on Apr 10, 2017 at 16:45 UTC as 8th comment
In reply to:

Twong: Polishing lens elements by hand, that must be for show only. There is no way to achieve high degree of reproducibility. Skilled professionals definitely exist, but not for this purpose, I hope.

You are so upset that you could not even type - "wth do you think "even with the LARGE astro mirrors ... " means?" How sad, I hope English is not your first language, which can explain a lot of your replies.

The word "large" has no absolute meaning, it is relative. You talk like a toddler. You need to go back to may be grade school to relearn the basic language skill.

Link | Posted on Mar 30, 2017 at 00:56 UTC
In reply to:

Twong: Polishing lens elements by hand, that must be for show only. There is no way to achieve high degree of reproducibility. Skilled professionals definitely exist, but not for this purpose, I hope.

No, I did not. That is exactly what you said. You may have missed something out without realizing it, but that is your problem. You did not mention what is large or small mirror in your previous reply.

Get a grip dude, like you said. If you have not learned the basics of logic, time to learn something. Don't get too upset, it has been fun. Have a good day.

Link | Posted on Mar 29, 2017 at 01:31 UTC
In reply to:

Twong: Polishing lens elements by hand, that must be for show only. There is no way to achieve high degree of reproducibility. Skilled professionals definitely exist, but not for this purpose, I hope.

@rrccad, you also contradicted yourself in one of your replies

"actually polishing astro mirrors is all done by hand .... astro mirrors which are usually done by machine"

Make up your mind if it is done by hand or machine. Or may be you are one of those management type who treats workers as machines.

Link | Posted on Mar 28, 2017 at 18:42 UTC
In reply to:

Twong: Polishing lens elements by hand, that must be for show only. There is no way to achieve high degree of reproducibility. Skilled professionals definitely exist, but not for this purpose, I hope.

@rrccad, you finally understood, what took you so long. You made assumptions that you could not substantiate. Now, you retreated to saying that I read too much into it. It is not there and it is not there. Case closed. You want to believe and so you accept blindly.

Link | Posted on Mar 28, 2017 at 16:29 UTC
In reply to:

Twong: Polishing lens elements by hand, that must be for show only. There is no way to achieve high degree of reproducibility. Skilled professionals definitely exist, but not for this purpose, I hope.

@rrccad, you are correct to say "grinding, alignment and pressure based upon interferometer results". But the report said "Master Craftsmen (or 'Takumi') can tell when to apply more or less pressure by feel alone" with no mention of instrument measurement, placing experience above instrumentation and suggesting experience is superior. Similar tactic is used in chocolate commercial that the chocolate master slowly pouring melted chocolate into a mold.

You failed to see this subtlety, but that is common human behavior. Our brains will fill in the gap of missing information as if they are there but they really are not. This is a common tactic in advertising.

Link | Posted on Mar 28, 2017 at 12:50 UTC
In reply to:

Twong: Polishing lens elements by hand, that must be for show only. There is no way to achieve high degree of reproducibility. Skilled professionals definitely exist, but not for this purpose, I hope.

Thank you, vscd. I know it can be done with proper measurement. But the report said this on slide #12:

"With decades' of experience, Master Craftsmen (or 'Takumi') can tell when to apply more or less pressure by feel alone. Some processes, like this one, are considered so critical that they must be performed by hand."

Do you see my point now? I believe DPR reported as is, but then one can only come to a less than comfortable conclusion, at least for Canon faithful.

Link | Posted on Mar 28, 2017 at 01:56 UTC
In reply to:

Twong: Polishing lens elements by hand, that must be for show only. There is no way to achieve high degree of reproducibility. Skilled professionals definitely exist, but not for this purpose, I hope.

I can see you just want to win the argument but with no facts to back you up except to claim that you know something.

Quote from slide 6: " Canon claims a tolerance of +/-30 nanometers." Do you even know what nanometer is? 30 nanometers equal to 3.0e-6 cm or 1.18e-6 inches. And you can feel that? Either you are nano guy or have no idea what you are talking about.

And you definitely have no idea what marketing will do to impress the public, especially uninformed public.

Link | Posted on Mar 27, 2017 at 22:24 UTC
In reply to:

Twong: Polishing lens elements by hand, that must be for show only. There is no way to achieve high degree of reproducibility. Skilled professionals definitely exist, but not for this purpose, I hope.

No problem, but you know no one can use "feel" to measure that level of precision. Anyone buying into that has no ability to discern facts from fiction.

Link | Posted on Mar 27, 2017 at 00:22 UTC
In reply to:

Twong: Polishing lens elements by hand, that must be for show only. There is no way to achieve high degree of reproducibility. Skilled professionals definitely exist, but not for this purpose, I hope.

I can see many of you implicitly believe that handcraft is better, there is no solid proof of that. Many companies are tapping into this baseless but emotional argument to justify the high prices. Let me quote from the report:

"With decades' of experience, Master Craftsmen (or 'Takumi') can tell when to apply more or less pressure by feel alone. Some processes, like this one, are considered so critical that they must be performed by hand."

He can tell differences in nanometer scale by feel alone? It must be an alternative universe he is living in.

Link | Posted on Mar 26, 2017 at 21:30 UTC
In reply to:

Twong: Polishing lens elements by hand, that must be for show only. There is no way to achieve high degree of reproducibility. Skilled professionals definitely exist, but not for this purpose, I hope.

For one off items, no point in building a machine. Doing it by hand does not guarantee quality, it needs machine measurement to know if it meets specifications. That measurement cannot be done by feeling as suggested in the report, no matter how well trained. The whole thing is a show that is part of Canon ad campaign.

Link | Posted on Mar 26, 2017 at 02:30 UTC
In reply to:

Twong: Polishing lens elements by hand, that must be for show only. There is no way to achieve high degree of reproducibility. Skilled professionals definitely exist, but not for this purpose, I hope.

You can of course choose what to believe. It is not DPR misleading you, DPR did a fine job. I did not question DPR integrity in this report; you have misread my comment. It is Canon that is doing the dog and pony show. Canon for sure loves faithful consumer who does not question or has no ability to question. Pay more and they will have more hand crafted lenses at huge profit margins.

Link | Posted on Mar 21, 2017 at 14:58 UTC
In reply to:

Twong: Polishing lens elements by hand, that must be for show only. There is no way to achieve high degree of reproducibility. Skilled professionals definitely exist, but not for this purpose, I hope.

I do know quite a bit about industrial processes. High precision is something I am familiar with. If you still believe the story, you have your head in the sand.

Link | Posted on Mar 20, 2017 at 23:05 UTC

Polishing lens elements by hand, that must be for show only. There is no way to achieve high degree of reproducibility. Skilled professionals definitely exist, but not for this purpose, I hope.

Link | Posted on Mar 20, 2017 at 14:48 UTC as 100th comment | 27 replies

When it was first announced, I thought the 4/3 system with a whole new lens mount was a bad idea. It still is. However, I bought into the m43 system though. It is not my main system but I just bought another m32 lens for an upcoming trip. The size of the entire system was the primary driving force. APS-C can be too big for certain situations. FF is just plainly too big. OTOH, MF is now getting my attention for ultimate IQ.

Link | Posted on Mar 11, 2017 at 21:30 UTC as 43rd comment
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