Rich Rosen

Lives in United States Stanhope, United States
Works as a retired
Joined on Aug 1, 2001

Comments

Total: 27, showing: 1 – 20
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Some years ago, it was predicted that the last serious DSLR would be the best there ever was. From what many owners have said, the D850 is that camera. And what do you have: strong proof that the next serious Nikon will be mirrorless. The restructuring of the Nikon imaging business was in part to increase efficiency, but also to prepare for the changeover to a system that require new lenses and accessories to match the new camera(s).

Link | Posted on May 18, 2018 at 00:45 UTC as 3rd comment
On article Sample gallery: Nikon 180-400mm F4E TC1.4 FL ED VR (126 comments in total)
In reply to:

Rich Rosen: 180-400 f4 at $12400, or 120-300 2.8 at $3600, with 1.4 TC at $300?

Or a D500

Link | Posted on Apr 20, 2018 at 15:56 UTC
On article Sample gallery: Nikon 180-400mm F4E TC1.4 FL ED VR (126 comments in total)

180-400 f4 at $12400, or 120-300 2.8 at $3600, with 1.4 TC at $300?

Link | Posted on Apr 20, 2018 at 13:30 UTC as 43rd comment | 2 replies
In reply to:

yazcui: They're Chinese... case closed

yazcui: You got me right! That's not an insult.

Link | Posted on Jan 17, 2018 at 01:03 UTC
In reply to:

yazcui: They're Chinese... case closed

Been to the US? I lived here my whole life, and I can tell you that there are people of all ethnic backgrounds that are just as nit picky.

Link | Posted on Jan 15, 2018 at 12:45 UTC
In reply to:

yazcui: They're Chinese... case closed

That comment is objectionable.

Link | Posted on Jan 15, 2018 at 00:09 UTC

The elephant in the rooms has been the CFast card, which is used by Canon and manufactured by Sandisk and Lexar. But Canon, Black Magic and Arri use CFast, so the elephant is pretty big. But Cfast has limitations, because of its SATA interface, which limits the card to 600mb/s. The Compact Flash Association, that support Cfast and not XQD, has now brought out a new standard; CFExpress, which has a much higher theoretical speed limit, because of the use PCie interface. It will also be backwards compatible to XQD devices. Of course these cards are only of interest to pro(sumers) who need speed, for which the CF card has reached its theoretical limit. The SD and its variants, are cards that a vast majority of cameras currently manufactured use.

Link | Posted on Nov 13, 2017 at 22:28 UTC as 1st comment
On article Nikon D3: The camera that changed everything (294 comments in total)

The D3 convinced me, at the time that full frame was the way to go. I admit that it was my GAS that got me to buy it, because at the time, I had a wonderful D2X that met my needs. But once I started using the D3, there was no turning back. Its speed, AF accuracy and low light capabilities led me to eventually sell all my APS-C cameras and use only full frame for a number of years (last year I did buy the D500 APS-C camera). Some of my best pictures were taken with the D3, and those images endure today as my best work. My decision to sell the D3, to get a D810, has given me some regret. While the D810 is clearly an incredible camera, the D3 was a better choice my intended use; sports.

Link | Posted on May 25, 2017 at 21:09 UTC as 67th comment
On article Nikon D7500 vs Nikon D500: Which is better for you? (398 comments in total)
In reply to:

Rich Rosen: The D7500 is probably a great camera, for those who don't need the speed, the buffer, the "pro type" body of the D500. I consider it an alternative camera to the D7200, and not an upgrade. I would not consider it because I do own a D500, and a D810, which more than covers all my needs. I am some what surprised at the price of the D7500, which is more expensive than the D7200. It could be the cost of the processor and sensor, but its features definitely don't warrantee increase in price.

If the D7500 is using the same processor sensor combination as the D500, it is only about a half a stop better than the D7200. Of course you are neglecting the fact that the D7500 is a 21mpixel camera compared to the D7200's 24. You are also neglecting the fact that the D7500, has one card slot compared to the two on the D7200. And finally...well not finally; the D7500 currently does not have the ability to take a battery grip, an accessory thats vital for using long lenses and shooting bursts in sports that can easily exhaust your battery in a football or lacrosse game. By the way CIPA rates the D7500 at only 950 frames per battery charge compared to the D7200's 1250+. No grip???
As far as being a better value than the D500. Nah. They're both expensive. At least the D500 gives you the best AF system in the Nikon lineup, the ability to shoot 10 frames per second, and shoot continuously for 200 frames without slowing down.

Link | Posted on May 13, 2017 at 22:55 UTC
On article Nikon D7500 vs Nikon D500: Which is better for you? (398 comments in total)

The D7500 is probably a great camera, for those who don't need the speed, the buffer, the "pro type" body of the D500. I consider it an alternative camera to the D7200, and not an upgrade. I would not consider it because I do own a D500, and a D810, which more than covers all my needs. I am some what surprised at the price of the D7500, which is more expensive than the D7200. It could be the cost of the processor and sensor, but its features definitely don't warrantee increase in price.

Link | Posted on Apr 19, 2017 at 15:48 UTC as 13th comment | 2 replies
On article Throwback Thursday: Nikon D70 (221 comments in total)

At the time, I was impressed with the images that came from this camera. So much so, that I walked into a local camera store, handled it for two minutes and bought it, along with 18-70 lens, and the Sb50 flash. But it never really became a favorite of mine. I think part of that can be attributed to Gas. I also had a D100, and D1X at the time. I moved on to other cameras; the D2x, the D200, and then the D3, I gave the D70 to my granddaughter, the lens and flash to her Aunt.

Link | Posted on Mar 31, 2017 at 13:02 UTC as 38th comment
On article Throwback Thursday: Our first cameras (394 comments in total)

My first "real camera," was a Pentax ME-Super, given to me by my wife. I still own it, but it stopped working years ago. The film advance jammed, and I chose never to get it repaired, because by that time I was into Nikon. My first digital camera was a Nikon 950 with its swivel. Except for its shutter lag (horrendous, compared to film), and battery, I enjoyed that camera immensely. But I "graduated" to DSLR's with the Nikon D1X.

Link | Posted on Mar 18, 2017 at 01:03 UTC as 101st comment
In reply to:

Rich Rosen: I know some like the idea of retro...the idea of totally manual settings, of manual focus, of the old solid metal bodies, and of a minimalist user interface. I kind of like some of those ideas myself, but not at the cost of $6500 (US), plus lens, for technology that is not exceptional. Would I like to own a Leica? Sure. But I can also get much of the same feel from an Fuji XPRO 2, at 1/4th the cost, and get a very pleasing photo experience.

Hey, if I were you and I owned the number of Leica's that you do, no other camera would feel quite the same way. But, for me, who owns nothing but traditional and digital SLR's. I can only guess about the experience that Leica, or for that matter, Fuji, brings to the plate. I have shot Leica on rare occasions, but have never shot any other rangefinder (mirrorless). So you are right; "you" is the key word.

Link | Posted on Feb 3, 2017 at 01:32 UTC

I know some like the idea of retro...the idea of totally manual settings, of manual focus, of the old solid metal bodies, and of a minimalist user interface. I kind of like some of those ideas myself, but not at the cost of $6500 (US), plus lens, for technology that is not exceptional. Would I like to own a Leica? Sure. But I can also get much of the same feel from an Fuji XPRO 2, at 1/4th the cost, and get a very pleasing photo experience.

Link | Posted on Jan 27, 2017 at 22:55 UTC as 47th comment | 16 replies
On article Slik Lite tripods feature built-in LED lights (46 comments in total)
In reply to:

MikeManr: I wish the dials and buttons on the camera would illuminate while in the darkness.

D500, D5.

Link | Posted on Dec 2, 2016 at 21:47 UTC
On article Field Test: Shooting action with the Nikon D5 (118 comments in total)

The new Nikon AF system is amazing. The use of 3D AF is great if you know who the subject is prior to shooting, but in team sports, such as football, basketball and lacrosse, that is not always possible. In Dynamic AF is best in those instances.

Link | Posted on Sep 6, 2016 at 19:46 UTC as 27th comment | 1 reply
In reply to:

Rich Rosen: What I find interesting, is that even with all the hoopla about newspapers going to photographers using smart phones, even with the so called stampeding of mirrorless, Getty has chosen to use the "antiquated" DSLR as their primary "weapon." I'm sure that mirrorless and smart phones will make an appearance, but it the DSLR that will be doing the heavy lifting.

Deep7: are you suggesting that there is no lag time, between what you see, and what is occurring in an EVF? I know what the lag time is in an OVF; the speed of light. But how does the electronics effect what you are viewing in an EVF?
I agree that mirrorless could be the dominant system in several years. It is certainly a next step in photography. But not today! Getty knows what Canon can do. I am also sure, that Getty has a sweet deal with Canon. For an event as important as the Olympics a company like Getty wouldn't experiment with new equipment. That will only happen when such equipment has been vetted at lesser events, and proven to be able to do the job.

Link | Posted on Jul 27, 2016 at 15:57 UTC
In reply to:

Rich Rosen: What I find interesting, is that even with all the hoopla about newspapers going to photographers using smart phones, even with the so called stampeding of mirrorless, Getty has chosen to use the "antiquated" DSLR as their primary "weapon." I'm sure that mirrorless and smart phones will make an appearance, but it the DSLR that will be doing the heavy lifting.

You may be right. I am not commenting on the abilities or inabilities of mirrorless. I am only commenting on Getty's decision to continue to use of DSLR's over mirrorless. However I would suggest that part of that decision has a lot to do with the power issues, the viewfinder lag times, autofocus speed and the availability of native long primes that are available. In all those instances, the DSLR is still superior. A skilled photographer with those advantages, will trump (no pun intended) a skilled photographer without those advantages.

Link | Posted on Jul 26, 2016 at 22:35 UTC

What I find interesting, is that even with all the hoopla about newspapers going to photographers using smart phones, even with the so called stampeding of mirrorless, Getty has chosen to use the "antiquated" DSLR as their primary "weapon." I'm sure that mirrorless and smart phones will make an appearance, but it the DSLR that will be doing the heavy lifting.

Link | Posted on Jul 26, 2016 at 21:49 UTC as 35th comment | 10 replies
On article D500 owner formally accuses Nikon of false advertising (474 comments in total)

That is one aspect of the D500 that is disappointing. While I did my research, and knew that Snapbridge and D500 connectivity wouldn't be available until after the Summer, for iOS, the apple logo is all over the D500 box and in the manual. I also understand that The Snapbridge App isn't much better than the WMAU app that is available for the D750 and other models. It is primitive at best.

Link | Posted on Jun 16, 2016 at 19:39 UTC as 177th comment | 2 replies
Total: 27, showing: 1 – 20
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