Jason

Lives in United States Salt Lake City, United States
Joined on Apr 25, 2001

Comments

Total: 133, showing: 1 – 20
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Okay. You got me. This is a promo for the new Zoolander sequel, right?

Link | Posted on Jul 9, 2021 at 22:56 UTC as 106th comment
In reply to:

mahonj: 127 film - we had a 127 camera at home when I was small, large negs, but not great camera quality. If you scan them, however, they reveal a great deal of detail. Not as good as 120 film, but much cheaper cameras. P.s. if you scan the contact prints, they will also come up well.
I would add Polaroid instant film, and viewmaster slide sets (OK, you didn't take them, but they were camera-y).
I would say that cameras like the Olympus XA and it offspring began to kill off the smaller formats, especially when they automated loading and everything else on 35mm.
Then came digital and blew all that away.
Then came smartphones and blew the point and shoot digital market away.

I have a Yashica 44 TLR (similar to a baby Rollei) that uses 127. It's in mint condition, not counting the light meter. You can still get 127, but it's expensive. So I wedge a couple nickels in my 44 for spacers, and it becomes a really high-quality 35mm sprocket rocket. Winding and framing is unpredictable, but it's still a lot of fun.

Link | Posted on Jun 18, 2021 at 19:19 UTC
In reply to:

Jason: I had a "spy" camera I got from some sort of mail in offer when I was a kid in the 80s. The body of the camera clipped into the middle of a 110 cassette, with the film canisters exposed. It had a flip-up viewfinder (no glass--just a plastic square). I thought that thing was so cool and stealthy. I don't think I have any photos from it--probably threw them all out because they were poorly exposed.

A few years ago, I had some 110 nostalgia, god only knows why. I sought out a mint Rollei A110. It was a beautiful and heavy little piece of engineering. On my first roll, I was composing a shot while walking the dog. The dog suddenly yanked on his leash, and the camera leapt out of my hands. I had the stupid metal strap on, but it somehow untangled itself from my hands and hit the pavement. It wouldn't wind properly after that. That was the end of my 110 nostalgia.

Thanks for reading my story.

@FrancoD Very similar! It's been a couple decades at least since I saw mine, but I think it was a red Hot Shot Mini, like this one: https://www.flickr.com/photos/maoby/13202755775

Link | Posted on Jun 11, 2021 at 23:02 UTC

I had a "spy" camera I got from some sort of mail in offer when I was a kid in the 80s. The body of the camera clipped into the middle of a 110 cassette, with the film canisters exposed. It had a flip-up viewfinder (no glass--just a plastic square). I thought that thing was so cool and stealthy. I don't think I have any photos from it--probably threw them all out because they were poorly exposed.

A few years ago, I had some 110 nostalgia, god only knows why. I sought out a mint Rollei A110. It was a beautiful and heavy little piece of engineering. On my first roll, I was composing a shot while walking the dog. The dog suddenly yanked on his leash, and the camera leapt out of my hands. I had the stupid metal strap on, but it somehow untangled itself from my hands and hit the pavement. It wouldn't wind properly after that. That was the end of my 110 nostalgia.

Thanks for reading my story.

Link | Posted on Jun 11, 2021 at 15:26 UTC as 47th comment | 5 replies

These little drives are my favorite. I have a pair of the 500MB/s version. My photo/video library lives on one. I use the other for a bootable backup drive. I use Carbon Copy Cloner to automatically clone my internal drive once a week. If my computer dies, I just boot from my backup drive on any recent Mac, and it's like nothing ever happened.

These drives keep up with both tasks beautifully.

Link | Posted on Jun 2, 2021 at 15:49 UTC as 8th comment

Impressed! I loved it. Bryant Lake Bowl and Theater looks really cool, too.

Link | Posted on Mar 10, 2021 at 16:50 UTC as 56th comment
In reply to:

Jason: Love it. Bodies of work like this make me look at my stack of camera gear and wonder what the heck I think I'm doing with all this crap when other people can make compelling art like this with a simple (but amazing) camera like the 35S.

The answer is easy, of course--I'm compensating for a lack of talent.

@Samuel - I appreciate the encouragement, but the idea that these photos are mostly about access is minimizing the photographer's ability. You don't get shots like these just by being there. You have to recognize the beauty in a moment as it's happening. It's a gift, and I greatly admire it.

Link | Posted on Mar 5, 2021 at 18:53 UTC

Love it. Bodies of work like this make me look at my stack of camera gear and wonder what the heck I think I'm doing with all this crap when other people can make compelling art like this with a simple (but amazing) camera like the 35S.

The answer is easy, of course--I'm compensating for a lack of talent.

Link | Posted on Mar 5, 2021 at 16:36 UTC as 41st comment | 12 replies

Not sure what the definition of batch scan is here regarding Epson Scan, but I think Mr. Tomkins may have missed something. Batch scanning of manual crops in Epson Scan is easy.

I have a half-frame Oly Pen that shoots two frames in approximately the same space as a 35mm frame. As a result, Epson Scan doesn't know what to do with the negatives. I preview-scan a strip of 10-12 images and drag a selection box around the first image at the correct size. From there, there's a button to add another selection box of the same size. Once you move the second selection box into place, you can repeatedly click the button to add new selection boxes, and the software will intelligently position them in relation to the first two frames. As long as the frame spacing is uniform, the process is nearly automatic. Once all the selection boxes are in place, clicking the big scan button will scan all of the images in the same order the selection boxes were placed. It's actually a really easy process.

Link | Posted on Feb 17, 2021 at 16:35 UTC as 87th comment | 2 replies
On article DPReview TV: Fujifilm X-E4 first impressions review (92 comments in total)

Feel better! Looking forward to the full review as this seems to be the camera I've been wanting for a few years now.

In the meantime, The Last of Us Part II is a masterpiece. I'm on my second play through.

Link | Posted on Jan 31, 2021 at 19:27 UTC as 29th comment

Fascinating stuff. Now I'm off to fall down an internet rabbit hole about the inner workings of Tropel pens. Wish me luck!

Link | Posted on Dec 11, 2020 at 17:41 UTC as 24th comment
In reply to:

Jason: I had an interesting experience looking at these photos from my current state of mind. The last one of the children looking out through a frosty window--it could be in a Christmas catalog with a caption talking about visiting Grandma for the holidays with piles of brightly-wrapped gifts and sticky mugs of hot chocolate by a roaring fire.

But no--2020 got me, and I thought, these poor kids are in for some serious disappointment this year. Hopefully they don't give Grandma COVID--she might never fully recover.

I probably need medication. And a hug.

Aw shucks.

Link | Posted on Oct 29, 2020 at 20:20 UTC

I had an interesting experience looking at these photos from my current state of mind. The last one of the children looking out through a frosty window--it could be in a Christmas catalog with a caption talking about visiting Grandma for the holidays with piles of brightly-wrapped gifts and sticky mugs of hot chocolate by a roaring fire.

But no--2020 got me, and I thought, these poor kids are in for some serious disappointment this year. Hopefully they don't give Grandma COVID--she might never fully recover.

I probably need medication. And a hug.

Link | Posted on Oct 29, 2020 at 16:44 UTC as 35th comment | 2 replies

Love the one of Bernadette and Francis. Just keep enjoying that drink and don't look behind you.

Link | Posted on Sep 18, 2020 at 17:20 UTC as 14th comment

Is this Google altruistically trying to encourage youngsters to accept themselves as-is, or are they sick of OEMs screwing up their facial recognition database with altered portraits?

Link | Posted on Jul 20, 2020 at 21:11 UTC as 45th comment | 7 replies

Now that's cool. Amazing what these "consumer" devices can do in the hands of a highly talented and determined person.

Link | Posted on Jun 26, 2020 at 22:38 UTC as 32nd comment | 1 reply
On article DPReview TV: Scan film negatives with the Nikon ES-2 (276 comments in total)

Great background music for the subject matter.

Link | Posted on Mar 4, 2020 at 17:40 UTC as 76th comment

Cool thumb drive, but when are they going to start making some really tiny USB-C thumb drives? I used to have a tiny 128GB USB-A thumb drive that rarely left the port of my old MacBook Pro. It was so small I could leave it plugged in and toss the laptop in a bag without worrying that the port might be damaged. It was really useful to supplement the relatively small internal SSD. Now I have one of the stupid MacBook Pros with all the ports removed, and it still has a relatively small SSD. Help me out, SanDisk!

Link | Posted on Jan 8, 2020 at 18:24 UTC as 8th comment | 1 reply

Funny how in the clip of the video over the airport, the drone shifts orientation, almost as if the pilot was controlling it. Maybe he could send his log to DJI to find out whether the drone was faulty or his story.

Link | Posted on Nov 21, 2019 at 19:56 UTC as 80th comment | 1 reply
In reply to:

TillmanB: The Olympus XA was/is a fantastic camera, but a word of warning - even the newest examples are decades old and the electronics do not last forever. I've had a dozen of these things in the last few years and about a third of them have had issues with the circuitry that drives the shutter, often times manifesting itself as simply a dead camera, or a slightly more workable permanent self timer problem. Dropping these cameras tends to cause this problem, although is can often happen on it's own as well. Without replacing the circuit board (of which no new parts are available as far as I know) there is no repair to be done. It's a shame really, the lens on these little cameras is very good although due to how fiddly those tiny little controls are, I'd rather carry an XA2 or better yet a Trip 35.

I had a secondhand XA for a couple years. I used it quite often and loved the results, but I never really established a connection with it. The things I enjoy about film--manual focus through a big, beautiful view finder, fully manual exposure with chunky, old-school controls, the noisy shutter--were all missing. Yes, it's manual focus and aperture priority, but it's just not satisfying to use. It felt like the film equivalent of a smart phone, so I sold it. If I want to travel light, I'll use my iPhone. If I want to shoot 35mm, I'll use my OM-1.

So, if any of you are thinking of getting me a Christmas gift, please don't give me an XA ;).

Link | Posted on Nov 15, 2019 at 23:58 UTC
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