chlamchowder

Lives in United States WA, United States
Works as a Software Developer
Joined on Aug 28, 2010

Comments

Total: 314, showing: 1 – 20
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On article Have your say: Most important cameras of the 2010s (422 comments in total)
In reply to:

Reilly Diefenbach: The most important cameras hands down were the D800/e, or the Canon 5DSr, the first cameras that made image quality for any sort of normal enlargement a complete non factor. I suppose you could throw in the Sony a7r in there as well.

Also the D600 - if the 6D is on there for bringing the cost is FF down, the D600 should be there too.

Link | Posted on Dec 21, 2019 at 07:21 UTC
In reply to:

vscd: Everything was taken with DSLRs and only 3 pictures from a mirrorless A7 (mostly simpler ones). Reality knocks on the door when the weather get's harder or the professionals choose their equipment based on their needs.
I really hope that we can get more real pro-bodies from Nikon and Canon with serious sealing and a full grown DSLR body. Screw the batterykilling MLs in the field.

They'll probably release more bodies, but their old gear is so good. That's their biggest problem.

"newer gear gives you advantages" - the ones winning awards with the Canon 7D, 5D II, and Nikon D3 from over a decade ago clearly didn't get the message. And they're not going to get the message with the next generation either.

Link | Posted on Oct 18, 2019 at 22:48 UTC
In reply to:

vscd: Everything was taken with DSLRs and only 3 pictures from a mirrorless A7 (mostly simpler ones). Reality knocks on the door when the weather get's harder or the professionals choose their equipment based on their needs.
I really hope that we can get more real pro-bodies from Nikon and Canon with serious sealing and a full grown DSLR body. Screw the batterykilling MLs in the field.

Or really, things were so good half a decade ago that nothing now represents a significant upgrade. Pretty much if you miss a shot, it's not the camera - it's you.

Link | Posted on Oct 18, 2019 at 22:13 UTC
On article Canon's 32MP chip marks the end of the 24MP APS-C era (498 comments in total)
In reply to:

SmilerGrogan: Stop with the portentous silliness. Unless you're the VP of marketing for Canon it's not the "end of an era." It's another example of one of the world's great companies showing that it can out-innovate its supposed competitors.
The 24mp era won't end until every last 24mp camera is dead and the image files they created are no longer readable—so let's call it 150 years.

That wasn't my read at all. Reviewers only review new products (makes sense, old ones have already been reviewed so why do it again). So it's "the end of the 24mp aps-c era" in that we're going to see fewer new 24MP models released, and more high res ones.

Old bodies are great and continue to be great. IMO dpreview should bring old cameras back out in used buying guides and do some bang-for-buck comparisons with newer models.

Link | Posted on Oct 15, 2019 at 23:21 UTC
On article Canon's 32MP chip marks the end of the 24MP APS-C era (498 comments in total)
In reply to:

UllerellU: Yes, people who don't understand photography need this kind of data. 32mpx is more than 24mpx, more is better, therefore 32mpx is better than 24mpx, an overwhelming logic. In addition to my lens system and my bridge camera I always carry an LX100 MK1, when someone who has not touched a camera in their life sees it, their first question is always. How many mpx does it have? ... When I tell them that it has 12 their face is a poem, some suggest that their smartphones have more, then I ask them what a megapixel is and to what size it corresponds in cm, and their face goes to Be poker face. In the last year I will have printed at most two shots in A2 size, 24mpx with a zoom lens are more than enough for that size, if you put a good prime the thing changes considerably and you could print even bigger. I expect more from a site like Dpreview, has Dad Amazon ordered to make 24mpx sensors look obsolete? So we will all go to change our obsolete 24 mpx cameras for a 32mpx?

I don't have either camera, or any camera with more than 24 MP. But try with the $100 Canon 50/1.8 stopped down to f/4 or f/5.6. It should comfortably out-resolve both the 24 and 32 MP sensors especially in the center, giving the 32 MP sensor an advantage.

For the Sony, use their 50/1.8 if you want a native lens. it's $350 (bonkers insane price for a 50/1.8, but still below $550 = € 500).

The point is all you need to out-resolve any modern sensor is a moderate focal length fixed lens stopped down.

Link | Posted on Oct 14, 2019 at 22:49 UTC
On article Canon's 32MP chip marks the end of the 24MP APS-C era (498 comments in total)
In reply to:

UllerellU: Yes, people who don't understand photography need this kind of data. 32mpx is more than 24mpx, more is better, therefore 32mpx is better than 24mpx, an overwhelming logic. In addition to my lens system and my bridge camera I always carry an LX100 MK1, when someone who has not touched a camera in their life sees it, their first question is always. How many mpx does it have? ... When I tell them that it has 12 their face is a poem, some suggest that their smartphones have more, then I ask them what a megapixel is and to what size it corresponds in cm, and their face goes to Be poker face. In the last year I will have printed at most two shots in A2 size, 24mpx with a zoom lens are more than enough for that size, if you put a good prime the thing changes considerably and you could print even bigger. I expect more from a site like Dpreview, has Dad Amazon ordered to make 24mpx sensors look obsolete? So we will all go to change our obsolete 24 mpx cameras for a 32mpx?

@UllerellU - Then just get a Nikon D7500 instead? No rolling shutter, burst w/14-bit raw files, excellent dynamic range, and fast buffer clearing.

People who want 32 MP will get the 90D, and everyone gets what they want. Also, Richard's point is that Canon's 32MP sensor maintains good high ISO and DR performance. I can't find whether it can burst with 14-bit raws, but it still clears the buffer quickly. So going to 32 MP from 24 isn't coming with significant drawbacks.

Link | Posted on Oct 14, 2019 at 20:02 UTC
On article Canon's 32MP chip marks the end of the 24MP APS-C era (498 comments in total)
In reply to:

UllerellU: Yes, people who don't understand photography need this kind of data. 32mpx is more than 24mpx, more is better, therefore 32mpx is better than 24mpx, an overwhelming logic. In addition to my lens system and my bridge camera I always carry an LX100 MK1, when someone who has not touched a camera in their life sees it, their first question is always. How many mpx does it have? ... When I tell them that it has 12 their face is a poem, some suggest that their smartphones have more, then I ask them what a megapixel is and to what size it corresponds in cm, and their face goes to Be poker face. In the last year I will have printed at most two shots in A2 size, 24mpx with a zoom lens are more than enough for that size, if you put a good prime the thing changes considerably and you could print even bigger. I expect more from a site like Dpreview, has Dad Amazon ordered to make 24mpx sensors look obsolete? So we will all go to change our obsolete 24 mpx cameras for a 32mpx?

This whole debate happened with the 36 MP Nikon D800 back in 2012. Basically 36MP didn't hurt much except shooting speed (it only shot at 4 fps unless you cropped).

But the 90D shoots at 10 fps so there's not much to complain about unless you have tiny/slow memory cards.

Link | Posted on Oct 14, 2019 at 19:42 UTC
On article Canon's 32MP chip marks the end of the 24MP APS-C era (498 comments in total)
In reply to:

J C Strange: Totally agree!

Also that Samsung was UGLY!

I thought lack of recognition as a serious camera brand might have been it, but Sony faced many of the same issues. They weren't known as a serious camera brand. NEX cameras had serious UI issues and high end SLTs had control dial lag. I had a Sony a580 and it didn't feel as polished as Nikon (unless you talk about LV, that was actually quite polished).

The difference to me is Sony inherited a strong lineup of Minolta glass, and made an adapter for E-mount that enabled AF with those older lenses. I'm sure NX lenses were fine optically, but it's about filling as many niches as possible with a wide lens lineup, and Minolta glass probably held the line.

Could be something else too. It's just weird to see Samsung not survive while Sony did.

Link | Posted on Oct 14, 2019 at 19:34 UTC
On article Canon's 32MP chip marks the end of the 24MP APS-C era (498 comments in total)
In reply to:

J C Strange: Totally agree!

Also that Samsung was UGLY!

Yeah, what happened to the NX1? It seems to have all the stuff you'd expect from a modern MILC, like a high res EVF, high framerate, and tons of on-sensor PDAF points covering the frame. Was it just native lens lineup?

Link | Posted on Oct 14, 2019 at 18:02 UTC

The real problem is, you're compressing DR down to 8-bits because HDR monitors are almost nonexistent. With any high contrast scene, you're still messing with sliders trying to make both the highlights and shadows fit in those 8 bits without looking totally washed out.

But don't get me wrong - this is really cool. Making sure you almost never lose that highlight detail without wasting time turning dials to adjust exposure is really, really nice.

Link | Posted on Oct 12, 2019 at 00:17 UTC as 36th comment
In reply to:

Richard Murdey: Well I dunno, I didn't read this kind of discussion when Sony last updated their A6x00 line. If Sony can continue to sell A6x00 cameras I don't see what's stopping Nikon from selling a fair few of these Z50 models.

For standard zooms, Nikon has that covered both in F-mount (18-55 kit, 17-55/2.8, 18-200, etc), and is actively working on it for Z-mount (16-50 kit, 18-140 coming).

I see your point about wideangle primes. Pentax seems to be the only one with a strong APS-C lens lineup in that area. Everyone else probably figured it made more sense economically to have one production line with bigger volume, versus splitting that between two lines by making a separate APS-C lens. In Pentax's lineup, there aren't many cheap examples. For example the 15/4 is $400 - more than a Nikon 24/2.8.

As for lenses working differently when the 1.5x crop goes away, I still think that's better than heavy vignetting (which you get when mounting DX lenses on FF).

Finally I doubt Nikon's ditching enthusiast APS-C. There's the D500, D7500, and of course the Z50. None of those are cheap. (Edit: Z50 not Z6 lol)

Link | Posted on Oct 11, 2019 at 21:31 UTC
In reply to:

User8242780838: I don´t understand the idea behind it. The mount is the same as for full format, so why the small sensor? Does not make much sense to me, especially if DX lenses can only be used with awkward adapters. Ok, it may be intended to be an intermediate solution, but that in turn means that the DX SLRs are being discontinued. I personally don´t mind, I´m happy with my D500 and will be. But if I went to a mirroless, I´d go for 24x36 straight away.

1. smaller sensors are cheaper
2. same situation with canon/sony - there's a wide selection of EF/A mount lenses that you can only use with an awkward adapter. Also there are native FF lenses you can use without an adapter. Covering a larger imaging circle won't stop them from working well on a smaller format.
3. DX SLRs probably won't be discontinued anytime soon. We've been hearing that for a while, but those things still sell and some people prefer the smaller format (for pixel density, price, or whatever). And it's not just Nikon. Canon also makes plenty of APS-C DSLRs and apparently they sell enough to launch tons of new models.

Link | Posted on Oct 11, 2019 at 18:05 UTC
In reply to:

rcl100: This is getting so freaking old with Nikon, Canon, etc. As always, I have to live with a mediocre “kit lens” (already sick of this), just so I can have image stabilization. Shoot video with a camera? What a concept! Nikon, Canon, etc. are still in the Stone Age, no wonder people are using their phones instead.

Show me a phone that can cover 24-70mm with stabilization, and still handle well as a phone.

Link | Posted on Oct 11, 2019 at 17:48 UTC
In reply to:

Reilly Diefenbach: If I want a smaller Nikon, I'm going with a D3500 plus kit lens for $399.

Or buy used. Get a D70 for $39 and be happy with spending 1/10 of the money.

Link | Posted on Oct 11, 2019 at 17:47 UTC
In reply to:

Richard Murdey: Well I dunno, I didn't read this kind of discussion when Sony last updated their A6x00 line. If Sony can continue to sell A6x00 cameras I don't see what's stopping Nikon from selling a fair few of these Z50 models.

My opinion is APS-C support is only important for wide angle. Otherwise, normal or telephoto FF lenses with good central sharpness work just fine on APS-C sensors, with that 1.5x crop.

I'm curious what you're hoping to get with dedicated APS-C lenses. They aren't cheaper, only have a size advantage when comparing slow tele zooms, and even then it's not that much smaller.

It's simpler from both sides to have one lens (whenever possible) that works well on both FF and APS-C.

Link | Posted on Oct 11, 2019 at 17:46 UTC
In reply to:

jyw5: Chinese products are like weekends...they just don't last long enough.

@miric look away from China - look at Taiwan. Same Chinese people, different system.

TSMC, Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Company, makes all of AMD/NVidia's GPUs, almost all cell phone CPUs, AMD's CPUs, and who knows what else. Their major competitors are Intel, who's stuck on 14 nm while TSMC's on 7 nm, and Samsung (which has a much smaller presence).

Taiwan has a competent government and competent regulation. That's all Chinese people need to have Chinese owned companies compete head to head.

Link | Posted on Oct 9, 2019 at 20:56 UTC
In reply to:

Rob890: let of that stupid arm already

ARM is like the mirrorless camera of the microprocessor world. It's powerful enough for a lot of everyday activities, but held back by lack of software support on the desktop (=native lenses?).

But now there's binary translation (=adapting lenses?) to give a good start, so we'll see where it goes.

Link | Posted on Oct 3, 2019 at 16:38 UTC
On article iPhone 11 sample gallery (359 comments in total)

Nice images overall, but I think cell phones should really tone down the noise reduction artifacts. At pixel level, things don't look natural at all.

For example, the foliage detail in https://www.dpreview.com/sample-galleries/7185418017/iphone-11-sample-gallery/5649915546 looks like it's been
mushed by noise reduction, then sharpened to increase edge contrast. That kind of overly processed artificial look at ISO 160 is disappointing.

Link | Posted on Sep 29, 2019 at 19:04 UTC as 73rd comment | 1 reply
In reply to:

jyw5: Chinese products are like weekends...they just don't last long enough.

The iPhone is different because Apple's doing the QC.

Culture in China unfortunately places personal relations and loyalty over doing the right thing, and there's no accountability like there is in western nations (regulators won't touch you as long as you're in favor with those in power). Then everyone flouting regulations becomes a vicious cycle because you're at a competitive disadvantage if you do obey rules.

IMO China needs to look to Taiwan and other neighboring Asian countries as examples (and not copy their products. copy the underlying system of regulation and transparency that enables quality products)

Link | Posted on Sep 25, 2019 at 20:50 UTC
In reply to:

jyw5: Chinese products are like weekends...they just don't last long enough.

If you treat it well, it'll last. Not much can go wrong with a simple manual focus lens. There's no focus motor to fail, no electronics to be incompatible with, and really, not much at all.

It just needs to come way down in price to make any sense.

Link | Posted on Sep 25, 2019 at 02:28 UTC
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