A-Frame

Lives in United States United States
Joined on Nov 1, 2003

Comments

Total: 17, showing: 1 – 17
In reply to:

Lee Jay: "Anyone who manages a large image library knows how important keywording and captioning are for categorizing and keeping things searchable."

I have around 400,000 images, and they aren't keyworded. And I can find them.

Say you have a photo of a white poodle. Do you then create a folder structure:

animals/domestic/dogs/poodles/large/white/...

Of course you can just create a folder structure:
animals/dogs/white_poodle.ext

But what if the photo is "cats and dogs with a group clowns and children wearing animal costumes in front of the Eiffel Tower in Las vegas"?

Using folders to manage images is simply too limited. Sure you can use very long descriptive folders and names but why not just use keywords? Most OSs can now index metadata which makes the effort worthwhile. There's a reason why metadata and databases were invented.

Link | Posted on Sep 27, 2016 at 10:44 UTC
In reply to:

Lee Jay: "Anyone who manages a large image library knows how important keywording and captioning are for categorizing and keeping things searchable."

I have around 400,000 images, and they aren't keyworded. And I can find them.

How long does it take you to find images of specific subjects? Milliseconds or minutes? Even DAM systems with robust metadata it can take a few seconds to find images. Can anyone else find your images easily and quickly?

Link | Posted on Sep 27, 2016 at 02:43 UTC
In reply to:

PhotoKhan: In my calibrated monitor there seems to be a yellow/greenish veil cast in all the samples.

Definition is, indeed, very good but nothing to write home about for a MF sensor.

I was hopping to be more impressed. Maybe with the next batch of samples?

@tesilab 50MP+ would be great for product, architecture and landscape.

Link | Posted on Jul 7, 2016 at 00:28 UTC
In reply to:

PhotoKhan: In my calibrated monitor there seems to be a yellow/greenish veil cast in all the samples.

Definition is, indeed, very good but nothing to write home about for a MF sensor.

I was hopping to be more impressed. Maybe with the next batch of samples?

The color looks fine on my iMac screen calibrated with X-rite i1 Pro 2. I think this camera will be a hit with professional portrait photographers. I would like to see a 88-100MP version.

Link | Posted on Jul 6, 2016 at 21:17 UTC
In reply to:

The Davinator: 8x10 sheet of Provia. Done.

Thanks for your comments. It's always good to hear another point of view.

Link | Posted on May 19, 2016 at 20:38 UTC
In reply to:

The Davinator: 8x10 sheet of Provia. Done.

The PhaseOne IQ180 is old.

My comment about film applies to repro work. 8x10 film resolution is very good but achieving good results is extremely difficult if not impossible in a production environment.

Moreover, there is more to image quality than resolution. I have shot and scanned thousands of large format film and also use digital systems that cost more than homes. There is really no comparison between state of the art digital repro systems and scanning film. As much as like the look of film for fine art work I wouldn't recommend it for repro.

You might find this information interesting:
http://www.normankoren.com/Tutorials/MTF7.html
http://cybercopyfinearts.com/services/fine-art-reproduction-article/

Link | Posted on May 19, 2016 at 18:35 UTC
In reply to:

The Davinator: 8x10 sheet of Provia. Done.

The quality of scans from large format film does not come close to a directly captured image using a high-end digital back. Digital surpassed film a long time ago.

Link | Posted on May 19, 2016 at 01:50 UTC
In reply to:

A-Frame: Quality is pretty good but not as good as scanning backs.. I see some focusing and stitching errors.. It's still quite amazing and I hope this inspires other innovations.

Not gigapixels but a Rencay SuperFineArt has over 400MP. The Google Art Camera scans that I saw on their site has many image artifacts. I don't think this system will meet cultural heritage digital preservation standards. Maybe once the hardware and software improves this will replace highly trained repro techs but it's not there yet.

Link | Posted on May 19, 2016 at 01:34 UTC

Quality is pretty good but not as good as scanning backs.. I see some focusing and stitching errors.. It's still quite amazing and I hope this inspires other innovations.

Link | Posted on May 18, 2016 at 19:23 UTC as 28th comment | 4 replies
On article Two in one: LG G5 camera review (83 comments in total)
In reply to:

_vlad: I am quite surprised by low quality rendering - water color quite often especially in greens. Having V10 and G4 I hardly ever got this level of smearing. I think LG with this model has gone Samsung route - quite heavily overprocessing the JPG. V10 renders - at least in comparable scenes - visibly more naturally - not to mention available full manual video mode.

The LG G5 jpeg engine is not great. Using the DNG RAW mode shows the potential of this phone. I posted samples here:
http://www.dpreview.com/forums/post/57739745

LG should include advanced JPEG options for compression and noise reduction and or improve the jpeg engine.

Link | Posted on May 11, 2016 at 02:47 UTC
On article Two in one: LG G5 camera review (83 comments in total)
In reply to:

melgross: So, the main camera is good, but not great. The wide angle camera is fair, but not really good, but you really like the fact that it's there.

Considering just how bad the reviews for this smartphone overall have been everywhere, it doesn't seem as though these cameras are going to move the sales much. Very few people consider the camera as being more than one aspect of consideration, and rarely the biggest aspect.

Perhaps if this was a better phone overall.

I read lot of these LG G5 reviews. I think the implementation of the modular design and build quality could be better. However, I think the phone feels quite well made. Performance wise there is really nothing to complain about. The UI is fast and call quality is excellent. I chose this phone over other phones because of the dual camera and the modular feature. I posted test photos here:
http://www.dpreview.com/forums/post/57725594

Link | Posted on May 8, 2016 at 03:36 UTC
On article Two in one: LG G5 camera review (83 comments in total)

The LG G5 looks better in person than in photos. The wide angle lens is fun. Performance wise I agree the jpegs are over processed. The dng files look much better. I'm pretty excited about the possibilities of future modules. The Cam Plus is OK but not something I would use daily. Overall it's a great phone.

Link | Posted on May 6, 2016 at 22:54 UTC as 23rd comment
On article Hands on with the Hasselblad H6D 50c/100c (267 comments in total)
In reply to:

fzrTom: A little question : who is using this kind of camera and what for ?

As many companies sale medium format cameras with a very high pricing (10k$, 20k$, 30k$, much more$) I'm curious to know who use them ?

Commercial studios, museums and libraries need high resolution and high dynamic range systems. I would consider a multi-shot version of the 100c but will now most likely go with a scanning back.

Link | Posted on Apr 12, 2016 at 21:20 UTC
On article Hasselblad unveils pixel-shifting 200MP H5D-200c MS (231 comments in total)

As the Hasselblad spokesperson said there is market for these high MP systems in libraries, universities, museums and archives. These markets are more interested in resolution and colour accuracy than high ISO performance. It will be interesting to see how this camera performs in the lab/studio.

Link | Posted on Aug 24, 2014 at 00:31 UTC as 9th comment
On article Nikon AF-S Nikkor 58mm f/1.4G review (416 comments in total)
In reply to:

A-Frame: This lens is a portrait photographer's dream. $1,700 for a lens is not absurd to a professional or amateur photographer who knows the purpose and value of this lens. The so called experts here will always have something to complain about.

@Der Steppenwolf
Depending on the way the image was shot of course I can tell. Moreover an art director will show me a picture they want to emulate and often times they want a certain look to the out of focus areas. This is a fairly common situation in portrait and product commercial photography and something the amateur photographer may not encounter.

Link | Posted on Jan 2, 2014 at 15:50 UTC
On article Nikon AF-S Nikkor 58mm f/1.4G review (416 comments in total)

This lens is a portrait photographer's dream. $1,700 for a lens is not absurd to a professional or amateur photographer who knows the purpose and value of this lens. The so called experts here will always have something to complain about.

Link | Posted on Jan 2, 2014 at 02:54 UTC as 53rd comment | 8 replies
In reply to:

Archearer: For me as for architect and architectural photographer it’s a GREAT news! Thank you Samyang! I’m sure I’ll buy this lens at the first day it will be on sale in Russia. Nikon’s 24 mm PC-E lens is tooooo expencive, even for professional shooting. Samyang engeneers, if you read this, please don’t stop your work and also produce one more wide-angle lens – for interiors. I mean if you’ll design something similar to canon’s 17mm ts-e, but available for ALL systems – it will be BESTSELLER in interior photographers professional environment. Look: there is no similar products in Nikon’s line, and in Sony’s, and in Pentax’s also. So at current time interior and landscape photographers HAVE to use canon ts-e 17mm or large format film cameras like Sinar, which are very heavy and slow operating. But I’d like to have possibility to shoot interiors on Nikon d800, because of it’s awesome 36mp sensor and because I already have all Nikon’s system of acessories.

IMO 17mm is too wide for architecture since it can distort foreground objects. It does have some use for very small interiors but if you have the space longer focal lengths create more balanced images. The 24mm and 28mm are the most useful focal lengths.

Link | Posted on Sep 7, 2012 at 23:39 UTC
Total: 17, showing: 1 – 17