BurkPhoto

BurkPhoto

Lives in United States Charlotte, NC, United States
Works as a Training Content Developer
Has a website at none
Joined on Feb 11, 2005
About me:

I have trained sales people and photographers for a major school portrait lab... I create training content (text, images, graphics, video, curricula) for hire.

Comments

Total: 34, showing: 1 – 20
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In reply to:

TonyPM: What cameras come with this software bundled in the box?

Panasonic.

Link | Posted on Jun 13, 2017 at 23:58 UTC
In reply to:

BurkPhoto: I like the new MacBook Pro, and will probably get one at some point. But here's what I would still like to have:

• Built-in Blu-Ray Burner
• 1 TB startup SSD, plus some sort of slot to swap out SSDs
• Removable, hot-swappable 12-hour battery
• A better, pro-quality audio interface solution for inputs AND outputs (separate!)
• Removable retina touch screen that becomes an iPad when removed, and can be used as a Wacom-like tablet for retouching, artwork, etc. with the Apple Pencil.
• Virtual touch screen keyboard that works like that of an iPad/iPhone
• User upgradeable RAM (up to 32GB minimum, preferably 128GB)
• SD card slot that buries the card in the body of the Mac like PCs do!

This would kick the weight back up to 6 or 7 pounds, and make the whole thing thicker and/or bigger, but I DON'T CARE. I want something portable that does everything. I don't want a desktop, I just want an external monitor and a dock for my peripherals in the office...

…and NO, I don't want a Surface Pro!

ThinkPads don't run OS X/MacOS. For me, that's a requirement, not a wish. I first used a Mac in 1985, and despite running a PC database dev project from '91 to '96, I was p***ed off by all PCs until Win2000. Vista and 8.x were abortions, too. Win10 is okay, though it is still not MacOS.

Link | Posted on Dec 7, 2016 at 21:06 UTC

I like the new MacBook Pro, and will probably get one at some point. But here's what I would still like to have:

• Built-in Blu-Ray Burner
• 1 TB startup SSD, plus some sort of slot to swap out SSDs
• Removable, hot-swappable 12-hour battery
• A better, pro-quality audio interface solution for inputs AND outputs (separate!)
• Removable retina touch screen that becomes an iPad when removed, and can be used as a Wacom-like tablet for retouching, artwork, etc. with the Apple Pencil.
• Virtual touch screen keyboard that works like that of an iPad/iPhone
• User upgradeable RAM (up to 32GB minimum, preferably 128GB)
• SD card slot that buries the card in the body of the Mac like PCs do!

This would kick the weight back up to 6 or 7 pounds, and make the whole thing thicker and/or bigger, but I DON'T CARE. I want something portable that does everything. I don't want a desktop, I just want an external monitor and a dock for my peripherals in the office...

…and NO, I don't want a Surface Pro!

Link | Posted on Nov 4, 2016 at 20:46 UTC as 131st comment | 4 replies
In reply to:

Phototaker41: Too little, too late Canon. Personally, I think Sony A6300 is much better. Even though I am a Canon fan but I prefer Sony A6300 to Canon M5 when going into mirrorless camera field.

Yeah, Sony has some decent mirrorless cameras. So do Panasonic, Olympus, and Fujifilm. Panasonic and Olympus have over 80 lenses that work with the native micro 4/3 mount, and they can accept adapted lenses from most of the major camera manufacturers. Canon EF lenses adapt well to m43 bodies, as the better adapters retain their IS, auto-aperture, and AF functions.

Link | Posted on Sep 19, 2016 at 14:30 UTC
On article 6K here we come: Here's the new Panasonic Lumix DMC-GH5 (173 comments in total)
In reply to:

Mateus1: Why it's so ugly? Really clumsy shape. Like Zenith from Russia.

If you've ever used a GH4, you know the shape and control layout were designed for comfort and intuitive use. Buttons are right where they should be. You can customize the hell out of it. It just feels right, even for hours of hand-held use. And the menus are the cleanest, most intuitive I've ever used (I used to be a Canon and Nikon user).

Panasonic has listened very carefully to the professional community as they've developed their last few GH cameras. They have a Lumix Luminary program, similar to Canon's Explorers of Light, where pros contribute their ideas, reactions, and experiences with prototypical hardware. They fold that feedback into their engineering and design.

Link | Posted on Sep 19, 2016 at 14:22 UTC
On article 6K here we come: Here's the new Panasonic Lumix DMC-GH5 (173 comments in total)

Some detractors here are making fun of 6K because it SUPPOSEDLY can be recorded for just a short length of time. Some said the same things about the GH4 before it was released. As it turns out, I can choke an SD CARD on my GH4 well before the camera dies, and a single battery is good for over two hours of recording. It does record in 4GB chunks, but in the USA, at least, it doesn't stop until the card is full, or the battery dies. I can't imagine Panasonic putting a limit on 6K performance, unless local tariff laws require it.

Link | Posted on Sep 19, 2016 at 14:19 UTC as 43rd comment | 3 replies
On article 6K here we come: Here's the new Panasonic Lumix DMC-GH5 (173 comments in total)

The benefit of 6K is zooming and panning during editing (Ken Burns effect for video), and the ability to apply excellent software image stabilization (which has to crop the original image to work) . As with 4K downsized to 1080P, the result of down-sampling to 4K from 6K during post-production is improved definition and detail.

This camera will have a big niche in independent film production. GH4s are currently used by lots of filmmakers on very low production budgets, by commercial advertising producers, and by corporate video producers who double as still photographers for their training and promotions departments. The GH5 will improve options and output, while leveraging the use of existing lenses — both the 80+ native m4/3 glass, and hundreds more that can be used with adapters.

Link | Posted on Sep 19, 2016 at 14:13 UTC as 48th comment
In reply to:

Phototaker41: Too little, too late Canon. Personally, I think Sony A6300 is much better. Even though I am a Canon fan but I prefer Sony A6300 to Canon M5 when going into mirrorless camera field.

If people buy this, they're not paying attention. Canon needs to COMMIT or drop the M line. We expect more from on them.

Link | Posted on Sep 19, 2016 at 02:03 UTC
On article Panasonic Lumix DMC-LX100 Review (1003 comments in total)
In reply to:

Alex O Shea: Lovely camera! I've shot with it a lot :D
Here's a short film I made with the Panasonic LX-100:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UR7Clt6pEgo

VERY nice work on the video!

Link | Posted on Jan 25, 2016 at 21:39 UTC
In reply to:

supeyugin1: A speech full of lies and inconsistencies. She blames US embargo and Russia pulling out, but nothing about communist regime. She should have visited Soviet union in 80-ies, which pulled out of Cuba in 1991 (and not in 1999),to see the same thing.
She is blaming everything, but the real cause of the problem. She should visit North Korea as well to see similarities and make a conclusion.

Anyone with a political agenda is going to find it easier to persuade with facts, presented logically, and supported truthfully with images as examples.

You're right... This came off as grandstanding.

Link | Posted on Jan 25, 2016 at 21:13 UTC
In reply to:

BurkPhoto: The media of speech and photographs can go together, but the images MUST expand on the text, or vice versa. They must be in sync, conceptually. In this speech/video, the photographer speaks around the images, not to them, for them, or with them.

She comes off as just another artsy liberal with a cause to promote for those who pay her way.

This should be an object lesson to just shut up and let the images speak for themselves! Maybe she had to speak because the images are not that compelling?

A few decades ago, I had the privilege of attending the 1983 AMI convention. Noted photojournalist, Jim Richardson, made over 800 professionals cry like babies with his little two-projector, black-and-white slide show on Cuba, Kansas... "Reflections from a Wide Spot in the Road." It was a portrait of small town life. Each and every one of his images was artfully composed, instantly understood, and tugged at the heart strings. The narration provided tightly contextual frameworks for the visuals. A weeping crowd stood and applauded, and Jim took home the Crystal AMI trophy that year.

I didn't get any sort of reaction from this.

Link | Posted on Jan 25, 2016 at 21:06 UTC
In reply to:

BurkPhoto: The media of speech and photographs can go together, but the images MUST expand on the text, or vice versa. They must be in sync, conceptually. In this speech/video, the photographer speaks around the images, not to them, for them, or with them.

She comes off as just another artsy liberal with a cause to promote for those who pay her way.

This should be an object lesson to just shut up and let the images speak for themselves! Maybe she had to speak because the images are not that compelling?

In color, with digital gear, so I could choose the effect in post.

I would crop, in camera, using zoom lenses. I would straighten horizon lines, avoid cutting off body parts, make more use of depth of field and lack thereof, find human moments that look natural, rather than transitional, and I would sure as hell use more than 3600 exposures in ten years, as her talk implied.

I come from a serious background in multi-image, working for yearbook and photography companies that did a lot of photojournalism. I believe in the power of images set to music and the right contextual narrative to tell compelling stories. Standing at a podium and clicking PowerPoint slides is just boring as hell!

Would be communicators should take note of TV advertisers like Apple who know how to cut quickly through hundreds of images in 30 seconds, yet still make a powerful point!

Link | Posted on Jan 25, 2016 at 21:01 UTC

The media of speech and photographs can go together, but the images MUST expand on the text, or vice versa. They must be in sync, conceptually. In this speech/video, the photographer speaks around the images, not to them, for them, or with them.

She comes off as just another artsy liberal with a cause to promote for those who pay her way.

This should be an object lesson to just shut up and let the images speak for themselves! Maybe she had to speak because the images are not that compelling?

Link | Posted on Jan 25, 2016 at 20:31 UTC as 12th comment | 5 replies
On article Am I missing something here? (627 comments in total)

Nikon and Canon are both missing the mirrorless boat. The Olympus and Panasonic offerings are much more ingenious and mature.

Even Sony, with their a7 series, has a better approach. Why haven't Nikon and Canon seen the light and given us mirrorless full frame cameras that are a cut above everything else?

The SLR design was never right for digital. I even hated it the first time I picked up a Canon SLR in August, 1968. That stupid mirror blacked out the finder during exposure, and I've been ticked off about it ever since...

Link | Posted on Mar 27, 2014 at 01:37 UTC as 30th comment | 6 replies
On article Panasonic Lumix DMC-GH4: a quick summary (471 comments in total)
In reply to:

Ivan Lietaert: According to eoshd.com, the GH4 will cost $1,999 and the Interface Unit will cost the same.
As it happens I ordered a GH3 today (the whole kit), and I 'm having mixed feelings now. For what I do, I don't need 4K (right now) and I certainly don't have the funds for a 4K capable editing station and the expensive memory cards and storage etc.
What do you think, should I send back the GH3?

Keep the GH3. Build your lens kit. In a couple of years, 4K will start to become more interesting.

It will be at least five years before 4K starts to gain real traction in the mainstream. Remember that cable TV is dying!

Internet video is the new rage, and consumption on small screens (smart phones, tablets, and laptops) is growing rapidly. 4K requires WAY too much bandwidth for current network channels to support it in any major way. Give it time...

Some will say that 4K is needed to produce original content. Maybe in Hollywood, but that is another world for most video producers.

You can easily use your GH3 for another few years.

Link | Posted on Feb 12, 2014 at 21:23 UTC
On article Panasonic Lumix DMC-GH4: a quick summary (471 comments in total)
In reply to:

Cristian Mihai: My Macbook Pro ( not that is important here! 16Gb RAM with 2 SSD SATA 3 linked at 1Gb/s ) but with the normal Graphic card CANNOT play the 4K sample videos normally. 4K will force high end computer sales, storage, cloud space, etc...I

For 4K editing, get a Mac Pro (the new trash can design) and don't look back. It was designed for 4K video work.

The real sweet spot for this camera is commercial advertising agency use in TV ad production.

Link | Posted on Feb 12, 2014 at 21:15 UTC
On article Panasonic Lumix DMC-GH4: a quick summary (471 comments in total)
In reply to:

Filk4k: It would be great to have GH4 heart inside AG-AF101 body. Or maybe Panasonic is already cooking a new camcorder AG-AF4k, just a thought.

Calm down... This is a HYBRID camera: Stills plus video. It is not a video camera with stills tacked on; it is supposed to be a balanced combination of the two.

ND filters can be screwed onto the front of most m43 lenses.

Link | Posted on Feb 12, 2014 at 21:10 UTC
On article Panasonic Lumix DMC-GH4: a quick summary (471 comments in total)
In reply to:

GaryJP: I sometimes wonder what has happened to photographers' eyes. Look at the demonstration videos of 4k you see, designed to show the highlights of the medium, and they render people's skin as robot like and plastic. They are great for plastic, glass, reflections, and metal. We have got to a point where we accept digital artefacts unquestioningly, including the rather inhuman quality they impart to humans.

We always recognised film stocks had a quality. We now kid ourselves it's about "reality" rather than the intrinsic qualities of the medium. Electronic is not necessarily better than dye and light.

Years ago, I filmed a love story for television and faced immense pressure not to shoot it on film but video. I fought back and chose film. It makes skin look like something you would want to touch. Which helps love stories.

It's too late now. That ship has sailed. But it is saddening to me that all we can do is throw about big numbers and not actually LOOK at the mess they give us.

Film is dead. Long live film for those fanatics who can make a go of it, economically. You can have it.

Cameras like the GH4 will enable the rest of us to do a credible job of commercial video production for hybrid photography, training, advertising, promotions, "film" class projects, and even short "film" productions.

Trust me, your knowledge areas of lighting, lens selection and usage, audio production, and storytelling are far more important than whether you are using film or digital technology.

Link | Posted on Feb 12, 2014 at 21:03 UTC
On article 5 photography apps to download to your new iPad (151 comments in total)
In reply to:

(unknown member): For those of you not shooting a Full Frame DSLR and routinely making 16x20 inch prints or larger, I suspect these "toy" tablets with "crippled" "Apps" instead of real software (layers, masking to replace green-screen backgrounds, fine editng at the pixel level, etc.), are sufficient.

For reference, in additon to shooting with a DLSR, I still shoot B&W film 35mm-4x5 inches, develop it myself, and make prints up to 16x20 inches in my traditional "wet darkroom" as I have done since the mid 1970's. For some, quality in a no-compromise propsition.

Sounds like someone is about to move your cheese.

Film is dead. RAW is for rookies. Prints are going away, except at the VERY high end of the market, where inkjet rules.

http://www.hybridphoto.pro

Link | Posted on Nov 11, 2013 at 19:53 UTC
Total: 34, showing: 1 – 20
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