JordanAT

JordanAT

Lives in United States VA, United States
Joined on Mar 31, 2012

Comments

Total: 550, showing: 1 – 20
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In reply to:

winter1: As many before me. Tz100 update please. Improve evf and tilt lcd.
Then you can have some of my money!

The lens sharpness is just fine. Of course, to get a sharp TZ100 you have to do what I did and order three and run a QA test on a chart and then send the two rejects back. But the one I kept is fabulous!

Link | Posted on Apr 21, 2017 at 10:45 UTC
In reply to:

RadGuy: Goldsmith has no case, unfortunately. It's a derivative work of Goldsmith's photograph. And it hasn't impacted Goldsmith's ability to sell her original photo. She'll lose in court.

" It's a derivative work of Goldsmith's photograph"

Transformative is the word you're looking for. A derivative work is always the property of the original content owner. A good example is "I like big butts" by Sir-Mix-a-Lot as covered by Jonathan Coulton. The lyrics of the original were lifted from the rap and placed into a ballad with different cadence, meter, and chord progression, then sung in a lyric style with a completely different set of instrumental accompaniment. It's as close to transformative as you can get, but it's still deemed derivative due to the presence of the lyrics, and Coulton owns none of the original parts of the work he created.

Link | Posted on Apr 18, 2017 at 17:23 UTC
In reply to:

cshyde: Photographers have to make money some way so I suppose suing a dead man is one way to do it. At least some lawyers wont go hungry this winter.

In Soviet Russia, dead man sues you!

Link | Posted on Apr 18, 2017 at 17:13 UTC
In reply to:

photomikeleth: A photographer stealing a image and using it in another image is easier to determine if it is theft. When a painter uses an likeness in their work it is a lot harder to determine if this is theft or if the artist actually saw it like that without the photo.

More than likely the only ones that will make anything from this are the lawyers & the media. No the first case, won't be the last.

What about when an artist draws a picture of a physical artwork (monument)?

Link | Posted on Apr 18, 2017 at 17:13 UTC

...the statute of limitations has run out...

The only two things that last forever are diamonds and copyrights*.

*Nobody alive to day will still be alive when the copyrights on content created today run out. That's close enough until congress extends copyright length again in a few years.

Link | Posted on Apr 18, 2017 at 17:12 UTC as 14th comment | 1 reply
In reply to:

Samuel Jessop: The Galaxy S7 is a beautifully made device. The S8 would be top of my wishlist if it had 1. the larger sensor that is used in the Pixel, and 2. the option to turn off TouchWiz.

What is it you don't like about touchwiz? I switched from LG to Samsung last fall. I'm hard pressed to find UI elements I don't like (though I use NovaLauncher, so whatever Samsung uses for the launcher I never see). If you're talking about the GraceUI - I really like it, have since I got my Note 7, and like it now that it's on my G7E with the Nougat update.

I've also been pretty pleased with the phone camera. I think the difference between it and the Pixel is probably splitting hairs.

I should say, I'm likely not to fall for the S8 unless one of the variants turns out to be a Note (pen enabled) variant. The Note 7 was the first stylus phone I'd had since my WinMo days, and it was fabulous while it lasted.

Link | Posted on Mar 17, 2017 at 20:35 UTC
In reply to:

Iloveaircraftnoise: People need apps to remind them when the sun sets and where the milky way shines?

This really is a sad indictment on humans in the digital age.

As a student in the early 90s I looked into doing calculations which would allow this. At the time, it was a non-trivial task and I never got around to coding it up. It also took quite a while for the data to be available on the internet (my work was pre-web, around 1990/91). It's not about sunrise and sunset, but exactly when and where for an arbitrary location on the globe.

Link | Posted on Mar 16, 2017 at 23:17 UTC
In reply to:

munro harrap: Comparing a dual core i7 with a quad-core MacBook Pro last week and using Lightroom for 70 Raw files, the 4870 Mac took 14minutes for a fully corrected batch and the Lenovo i7, both with 16GB Ram took 31minutes. (with identical corrections)
With Optics pro the gap was MUCH greater with the dual core i7 Lenovo-like the one here -taking 65 minutes to do the same batch with Optics pro and the 4870 MacBPro taking about 20 minutes, so, as already stated its a non-starter with that processor, period.

Just put in a decent processor and you overtake the Macs as long as the battery life is competitive (i.e. better). A 2015 MBPro drained 72% of a fully-charged new battery on just one batch using Optics Pro (with the best noise reduction on). It did 6 batches using Lightroom. In other words using Lightroom to batch process RAW files on a macBook Pro (2015mid 4870model) drains a new battery (less than 50 cycles) in 85 minutes. Not useable in the field- as no spare battery possible.

You're up against physics here. The reason the quad core can processes 2-3x as fast is because it's running a processor which uses 3x the power. In both Skylake and Kaby Lake, the i7 U series parts are 15W TDP, whereas the HQ/HX are 45W parts. Whether you get it fast or get is slow, you'll be using a similar amount of battery capacity.

The old MBPs had a 100Wh battery in them - which made them pretty heavy but allowed you to go balls-to-the-wall for two hours of processing. But the battery alone weighs more than some lightweight dual core i7 machines. Until battery tech makes a leap forward, processing capacity - regardless of speed - is going to be weight bound.

Link | Posted on Feb 28, 2017 at 11:43 UTC
In reply to:

wilsonlaidlaw: is it just me that finds the current obsession with selfies (visit the far east to see it at its most absurd level), to be incredibly narcissistic and arrogant. These people with their phones on the end of sticks, in between hitting other folks on the head with them, seem to want to insert themselves in front of any scene they are taking.

Not really. It's just a version of the same photo that has been taken by travelers since the beginning of photography where you don't have to (a) give you camera to someone else or (b) set your camera down, start the timer, and then sprint to be in the photo.

The selfie isn't new, it's just a new technique for taking the same picture.

Link | Posted on Jan 30, 2017 at 12:02 UTC

I'm a little surprised the ones convicted of crimes at multiple parks didn't have their visa permanently revoked.

"Riding a bike in the wilderness" sounds like a crime only the Onion could dream up. (I get the meaning of it/reason for it, but it just sounds funny).

Link | Posted on Jan 25, 2017 at 13:11 UTC as 25th comment | 3 replies
In reply to:

junk1: Wouldn't customers prefer ink tanks on a $2000 printer?

"Ink tanks for printing high accuracy color stuff doesn't seem to be profitable"

FTFY

Link | Posted on Jan 14, 2017 at 19:11 UTC

I'm just sorry that Getty isn't somehow listed as a defendant.

Link | Posted on Jan 12, 2017 at 15:14 UTC as 10th comment
On article Rugged Fujifilm XP120 arrives just in time for winter (25 comments in total)
In reply to:

Xentinus: I really would love to have such a camera with;
-1 inch sensor
-a lens wider than 24mm (at least 21 or 18 would be better)
-tilt screen
(I know it would be bigger and heavier but it is ok)

A durable version of the Panny ZS100 would probably be my ideal camera. I could even live with a lower zoom range (say 5x, tho the 10x is really nice!) and a fairly thick body if it meant turning the optics with a mirror and taking up much of the interior space with the zoom mechanism.

Link | Posted on Jan 9, 2017 at 13:19 UTC
On article Dell's 8K monitor goes on sale in March for $5000 (215 comments in total)
In reply to:

Snapper2013: Nice but I'm holding out for 16K.

I'd be good with a 16k ultra widescreen. I'd be okay with a slightly lower dpi to get a 60" wide x 20" tall aspect ratio.

Oh, and I want it curved with an optimal viewing/centerpoint of 30". Or maybe a Surface Studio style raising/lowering.

(you laugh, but I currently have two 4k x 42" monitors and a 12" touch/pen tablet, and it's pretty glorious, but I'd love to get a higher resolution on the screens, lose the center bezel, and/or be able to use the screen as my whole freaking desk.

Link | Posted on Jan 9, 2017 at 13:13 UTC

On paper, as a still camera, this looks like a rebadge and a price bump. Similar lens (range, aperture), same sensor, same size, same battery life, same sensitivity, frame rate, and shutter speed range, and a bit heaver. So, for still photogs, they're adding a touchscreen for $400?

Link | Posted on Dec 9, 2016 at 15:56 UTC as 83rd comment | 4 replies
In reply to:

Arizona Sunset: You need to update this article with two separate f-stop and focal length charts. One to show a more granular increase between 24-100, and another to show the actual focal length represented accurately. Your current chart does neither.

I can see why you might want more points in the chart, but you know you could just write in the values below their chart since the sensors of all those are 1". Or we could ask DPR to simply start making their focal lengths non-dimensional by dividing the actual focal length by the diagonal of the physical sensor and make the charts useless for everyone, but satisfy the odd fetish you people have with equivalents.

Link | Posted on Dec 9, 2016 at 15:49 UTC
On article Mobile Speed: Portable SSDs for photographers (205 comments in total)
In reply to:

SimenO1: This method requires a PC as a middle man. There should exist solutions to avoid dragging along a laptop, but still have a large backup in case the camera is lost, damaged or stolen. Preferably wireless for continuously backups without the wire hassle. A battery powered Wifi NAS with the appropriate compatibility with wifi cameras.

IIRC, it didn't get great reviews. There's an instructables out there about building one, but it looks like more work than I'm willing to deal with. Esp when my laptop weighs barely 1kg.

Link | Posted on Dec 3, 2016 at 01:58 UTC
On article Mobile Speed: Portable SSDs for photographers (205 comments in total)
In reply to:

SimenO1: This method requires a PC as a middle man. There should exist solutions to avoid dragging along a laptop, but still have a large backup in case the camera is lost, damaged or stolen. Preferably wireless for continuously backups without the wire hassle. A battery powered Wifi NAS with the appropriate compatibility with wifi cameras.

You mean something like this? https://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/887222-REG/Sanho_shdcsudma2000_Casing_for_UDMA_2.html

Link | Posted on Dec 3, 2016 at 00:22 UTC
On article Mobile Speed: Portable SSDs for photographers (205 comments in total)
In reply to:

JordanAT: I'm a little surprised none of these have either an optional RAID 1, like the CineRAID enclosure (about $50) for data integrity, or a combination SSD enclosure and SD card reader, like the SIIG (about $25).

I haven't tried either, tbh - I was hoping that a piece on portable hard drives would cover more than "roll-your-own" and "4 different, but expensive, shapes".

I'm lazy - I've got a bare 1TB internal SSD and a SATA-USB3 adapter. It's not - in any way - a durable or rugged option, but it's small and convenient (and, relatively speaking, cheap.)

Link | Posted on Dec 3, 2016 at 00:18 UTC
On article Mobile Speed: Portable SSDs for photographers (205 comments in total)

I'm a little surprised none of these have either an optional RAID 1, like the CineRAID enclosure (about $50) for data integrity, or a combination SSD enclosure and SD card reader, like the SIIG (about $25).

Link | Posted on Dec 2, 2016 at 11:54 UTC as 56th comment | 3 replies
Total: 550, showing: 1 – 20
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