balios

Lives in Canada Canada
Joined on Jun 25, 2011

Comments

Total: 333, showing: 1 – 20
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In reply to:

realmadeira: I am old enough to remember the times when people were talking about size and weight advantages of the mirrorless...

Thankfully those days have passed. Ergonomics are more important than trying to cram your FF camera into your front jean pocket.

Link | Posted on Jan 18, 2018 at 19:55 UTC
On article On Assignment with Kylie Mazon and the Canon EOS M6 (132 comments in total)
In reply to:

eastwestphoto: where is the EVF view-finder? where is focus -peaking? Is the m6 a big fat cell phone? The photos looked good, sharp; good composition using the EOS lens mount. BUT; and a big but, back flange distance on EOS system to chip is longer than MFT or E-mount. So I question adaptability of the M6 to rangefinder lenses? Greatest reason to buy compact mirrorless is adaptability?

EVF is a purchased add-on. Leica M lenses can be mounted via a Leica M to EF-M adapter. IMHO, adapting rangefinder lenses to mirrorless has always been a niche market and not the reason most people buy a mirrorless.

Link | Posted on Jan 17, 2018 at 17:32 UTC
On article On Assignment with Kylie Mazon and the Canon EOS M6 (132 comments in total)
In reply to:

Acciolyfotograf: The Fuji X Pro 2 or even the X100F can do this Job beautifully, Really sorry Canon, not this time yet, keep working hard.

I tried photographing food with my X100F and it exploded. I recommend you get the Canon M6 instead.

Link | Posted on Jan 15, 2018 at 20:08 UTC

I'll wait for the fake "Fake Leica" sculpture on Ebay for $9.99

Link | Posted on Jan 11, 2018 at 20:48 UTC as 2nd comment
In reply to:

Jonathan Brady: Honestly, the worst part about this story as it relates to Canon is that they can't find the $$ to actually pay a photographer for an image. It's a company selling a variety of photographic equipment to a variety of people, including those who make a living from using the equipment they sold, and they can't be bothered to support them in return.
That's just sh***y.

The photographer was paid his asking price, which is $0. I don't see the point of being offended on behalf of the photographer. If that photographer is fine with the free use of his photo, then why would I have a problem with that? It's not my photo and I don't get a say in the matter.

Link | Posted on Jan 11, 2018 at 16:18 UTC

Good to know that my Canon 5Div photos can be composited with my Fuji X100F photos. Up until now, I've been worried that it would cause a tear in the space-time continuum. Thanks Canon.

Link | Posted on Jan 11, 2018 at 15:44 UTC as 72nd comment
In reply to:

George1958: I have a 5D mk IV and an Olympus EM 1 mk I, no way would I take a chance on getting them wet. Weather sealing is not water proof in my mind. It would be harsh to judge the Sony A7 negatively as there is nothing to say Sony claimed it was water proof.

I gotten my 5Diii and 5Div wet on many occasions with no issue. Not drenched but either in light rain unprotected, or heavy rain with moderate protection (eg. using a light stand and reflective umbrella as an actual umbrella).

My rational is that I have an event to shoot and the camera is a tool. I pay money to have a tool with weather sealing. If I don't use that feature then the additional cost is meaningless. If I worry too much about the tool, then I miss shoots. I understand the risk (the camera isn't water proof, just resistant). But for me its been an acceptable risk that has given rewards.

Link | Posted on Jan 10, 2018 at 14:49 UTC
In reply to:

OlavM: People do THAT many things for a living, like downhill skiing, an activity known to be a real hazard for one's life or health. Downhill skiing is on the Winter Olympic Games programme, and the skiers are heroes of sports. A large celebrity factor at the Kitzbühl downhill etc.. Still, the skiers do this for money, they're professionals. Remove the media and the attention from this sport, and it disappears soon ... see?

Everything you do carries some degree of risk. That doesn't make everything you do equally risky. In business you'd do what is called "risk analysis" to compare activities. Let's compare downhill skiing with hanging off skyscrapers:

If a million random people went downhill skiing, about 50 people would sustain a serious injury (0.005% change of serious injury), About 5 people would die (0.0005% change of death). These are based on actual statistics (NSAA.org). Based on the low chance of occurrence of serious consequences, downhill skiing is considered a low risk sport.

If a million random people hanged off a skyscraper, about 989,999 would die. I have no source for that statistic, but I believe that only 1% would not kill themselves (99% chance of death). Based on that rate, hanging off skyscrapers would be considered suicide. Or in other words, death is the expected outcome.

Link | Posted on Dec 15, 2017 at 14:26 UTC
In reply to:

Vik2012: But... but... weren't we told that DSLR's would be dead within two years, seven or eight years ago? How could this happen? ;-)

I would have guessed the most popular DSLR to be a Canon Rebel. But with the rather pricey 5D3 as the top DSLR, this list obviously doesn't represent the general market. All you can really say for sure is that more DSLR users are members of Flickr, especially if you own one of the higher end models. I still agree with your conclusion that DSLRs not dead yet.

Link | Posted on Dec 11, 2017 at 19:06 UTC

His excuse:

"When I received some torn-out pages from a handout flyer with these faces, my impression was they were already out in the public domain. Therefore, I thought they could be collaged as backgrounds to be further interrupted with text elements for the 4 Street community art-site concept."

Link | Posted on Dec 11, 2017 at 13:33 UTC as 5th comment
In reply to:

balios: 512MB of on-board storage with 500 MB of uninstallable bloatware...

I stand corrected, lol

Link | Posted on Dec 7, 2017 at 17:19 UTC

512MB of on-board storage with 500 MB of uninstallable bloatware...

Link | Posted on Dec 7, 2017 at 13:34 UTC as 16th comment | 2 replies

Shooting photo galleries for reviews in rainy Seattle weather is no longer a problem.

Link | Posted on Dec 6, 2017 at 16:26 UTC as 41st comment | 1 reply
In reply to:

stevo23: Did she get a model release? How did she obtain the photo?

You only need a model release if you use the photo commercially. In other words, she only needs a model release if she used the photo in such a way that Bruno Mars is perceived to be supporting or advocating a particular idea, product or service. She is otherwise free to take photos of Bruno Mars and sell them as photos.

Link | Posted on Dec 1, 2017 at 17:31 UTC
On article Gear of the Year 2017 - Dan's choice: Sony a9 (371 comments in total)
In reply to:

dynaxx: The same old clichets rolled out very time that a competent photographer compares a camera targetted at high-speed photography with what they want from an all-round camera. Dull, predictable and pointless.

Reading this article would never convey what a superb device this is for its intended purpose.

Perhaps it contains all the clichés about being a good all-round camera because Dan is an all-round shooter (this is an article about his favourite gear and why)? Rather than "clichés", I'd call them simply simply "needs", as in Dan is simply stating what the needs of an all-round shooter are and how the A9 met them.

What's of note to me is that this is the first Sony mirrorless camera where those "clichés" actually apply. It is their first mirrorless where the phrase "I still use my DSLR for sports" has been rendered obsolete. For all-round shooters (and there are many) the Sony A9 was a watershed moment.

Link | Posted on Dec 1, 2017 at 13:51 UTC

So if the NSA loses my personal data, there's a backup in China.

Link | Posted on Nov 30, 2017 at 20:37 UTC as 68th comment | 3 replies

Were the winners selected using artificial intelligence?

Link | Posted on Nov 30, 2017 at 20:34 UTC as 3rd comment

It's only partially selecting the shadows. I assume you'd want all or nothing. So maybe it's not so intelligent yet? Still impressive and time-saving regardless.

Link | Posted on Nov 30, 2017 at 17:55 UTC as 2nd comment | 1 reply
In reply to:

balios: I fail to see what DJI did wrong. If the contract that DJI offered contained an unacceptable clause(s), Mr. Finisterre has failed to divulge them. The actions of DJI, as described by Mr. Finisterre, are entirely consistent with a company concerned with protecting the private data of its workers and customers.

Mr. Finisterre says he accessed "highly sensitive user data, including: identification cards and passports, flight logs, and drivers licenses." DJI must absolutely ensure that any information is destroyed and not shared nor divulged. The $30K must therefore include some form of non-disclosure agreement.

After failing to reach such an agreement, it was also appropriate for DJI to send a legal demand that all information be destroyed. Regardless of whether an agreement is reached, Mr. Finisterre is not entitled to the "highly sensitive user data" he accessed.

Customer data is personal and sensitive: names, addresses, phone numbers, purchase history, credit card numbers, etc.

Employee data is personal and sensitive: names, addresses, phone numbers, social security numbers, salary, linked bank accounts, wage garnishing, etc.

Additionally, not all countries have national social security numbers. They will instead ask employees for copies of things like driver licenses or passports. These are also personal and sensitive.

Link | Posted on Nov 29, 2017 at 19:23 UTC
In reply to:

balios: I fail to see what DJI did wrong. If the contract that DJI offered contained an unacceptable clause(s), Mr. Finisterre has failed to divulge them. The actions of DJI, as described by Mr. Finisterre, are entirely consistent with a company concerned with protecting the private data of its workers and customers.

Mr. Finisterre says he accessed "highly sensitive user data, including: identification cards and passports, flight logs, and drivers licenses." DJI must absolutely ensure that any information is destroyed and not shared nor divulged. The $30K must therefore include some form of non-disclosure agreement.

After failing to reach such an agreement, it was also appropriate for DJI to send a legal demand that all information be destroyed. Regardless of whether an agreement is reached, Mr. Finisterre is not entitled to the "highly sensitive user data" he accessed.

"you seem more interested in semantics "

I've written paragraphs explaining why DJI's actions seem to be appropriate (to the best of my knowledge). You've ignored that and focused on a single sentence made to counter an accusation of forced silence (gag order) to point out he was actually offered a NDA in exchange for money.

And its not just semantics. It is an extremely important distinction when people accusing DJI of suppressing his free speech. Taking money in exchange for silence is a mutual agreement (willing), not forced silence (unwilling).

"An NDA doesn't ensure data is destroyed."

'NDA' is simply a word describing a general type of contract. Since it is simply a contract, it can contain any terms agreed to by both parties (such as a promise to destroy data). Whether you want to still call it a NDA is... semantics.

"who would be crazy enough to give DJI pics of their passport or ID"

Employees.

Link | Posted on Nov 29, 2017 at 14:22 UTC
Total: 333, showing: 1 – 20
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