riknash

Lives in Canada Canada
Joined on Dec 22, 2008

Comments

Total: 175, showing: 1 – 20
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In reply to:

Szumi: I'll just be happy with my 70-200 F2.8 II. It is my least used L lens.

It will be fun to read the reviews knowing I'm good with what I have. :)

That's a nice thought. Where it fails is that Canon repair support will be dropped and consequently the intrinsic value of the lens drops with it. Nothing worse than a lens that cannot be economically repaired. These devices are more prone to failure the older they get due to all the plastics that break down over time, the mechanical components like stabilizers that wear out, the electronics which drift or fail. Not to say that they'll fail the instant support is discontinued but something to consider. Sigma has a much longer warranty, something to consider when purchasing a new expensive lens.

Link | Posted on May 18, 2018 at 07:54 UTC

The Adobe subscription model provides the user with the privilege of paying for defective applications on a regular schedule.

Link | Posted on Apr 29, 2018 at 15:54 UTC as 6th comment
In reply to:

riknash: Did my comment disappear when I threatened to troll them? :)
Congrats Chris and Jordan! Does this mean you won't be hanging out at TCS anymore? Do you have to buy your own gear and has DPR given you a gear budget? What store will you buy it from? Online through Amazon? :)

I meant buy gear as in production gear. For example the GH5 is presently a main staple many videographers use regardless of what they are shooting in front of the camera. I'd be very surprised if camera reviews were always completely shot using the camera they were reviewing along with having a consistent rig for other non-camera products they might touch upon. There's also all the other equipment goodies they would need which should transition from freely borrowing from the TCS store they previously represented, to a professional arrangement. An equipment budget can be a fun exercise and potentially a lively DPR video episode or two for all the gearheads who want to know what gear they use as tools to make their productions.

Link | Posted on Apr 29, 2018 at 15:46 UTC

Did my comment disappear when I threatened to troll them? :)
Congrats Chris and Jordan! Does this mean you won't be hanging out at TCS anymore? Do you have to buy your own gear and has DPR given you a gear budget? What store will you buy it from? Online through Amazon? :)

Link | Posted on Apr 28, 2018 at 17:43 UTC as 195th comment | 2 replies
In reply to:

riknash: Standardized training would 've been a great benefit to ensure all are taught similar methods to handle potentially life threatening situations involving a possible weapon. What's problematic is that the standardized training recognizes the officer's situational vulnerability and teaches a rapid offence reaction to any perceived threat. The shoot first, ask questions later will always be the correct defensible response wherever a proliferation of weapons makes it reasonable to assume a weapon exists and would be used. One cannot assume an officer will make the correct decision when the trained response actively encourages a rapid, deadly response to any perceived threat.

dgumshu You asked; "How do you know that? Have you attended these training classes? Please share your expertise."
A co-worker quit his job and joined the local police service. He dropped by one day to visit. I couldn't resist asking him if he was prepared for situations where he might have to shoot someone. His response was rather chilling as he declared the threat as a bad person needing to be shot without hesitation. A few days later a local police involved incident occurred with an angry motorist who attempted to drive away from a police officer standing in the way who immediately discharged his weapon through the window into the soon-dead motorist. The police officer was cleared of any wrongdoing contending the motorist was using his vehicle a s a weapon. Since police involved shooting investigations are not fully disclosed to the public, it's not clear how the investigation team arrived at their conclusion.

Link | Posted on Apr 25, 2018 at 11:01 UTC

Looks good. I can't believe how many negative responses there are to this product. Looks like a handy piece of gear. As Casey Neistat said in a recent 386 YouTube, smartphones are the future of cinema photography as its the great equalizer. Everyone has one in their pocket. Its not the gear but how you use it. An adapter like this provides added flexibility to get great cinematic shots using your smartphone and your DSLR or cine lenses.
I'm curious as to how it normalizes the image circle to 'fit' the smaller smartphone sensor. How "good" do the adapter optics have to be to provide lossless and distortion free image quality to the smartphone? Would micro-scratches on the surface of the smartphone lens significantly affect image quality with this adapter?

Link | Posted on Apr 12, 2018 at 14:31 UTC as 15th comment

Standardized training would 've been a great benefit to ensure all are taught similar methods to handle potentially life threatening situations involving a possible weapon. What's problematic is that the standardized training recognizes the officer's situational vulnerability and teaches a rapid offence reaction to any perceived threat. The shoot first, ask questions later will always be the correct defensible response wherever a proliferation of weapons makes it reasonable to assume a weapon exists and would be used. One cannot assume an officer will make the correct decision when the trained response actively encourages a rapid, deadly response to any perceived threat.

Link | Posted on Apr 3, 2018 at 17:37 UTC as 42nd comment | 32 replies
On article Sigma interview: 'This is just the beginning' (339 comments in total)
In reply to:

canonshark: This is a great interview. So much useful and interesting information, so different from mostly content-free interviews with other major camera/lens manufacturer executives.

Content-free? I'd rather call it content-void from the interview of the Canon executives. Canon's interview was very frustrating to understand any sense of how confident I should be as a consumer of the direction for their camera products. Mr. Yamaki gets full marks for a very informative interview.

Link | Posted on Mar 19, 2018 at 17:46 UTC
On article Sigma interview: 'This is just the beginning' (339 comments in total)

Gotta like Mr. Yamaki and the company he represents. Sigma has stepped up their optical quality in the past five years and now makes some very fine glass that is second to none.
I did find one comment he made a bit disturbing; "They [Sony] rely on distortion correction in the camera body". That's a trend I'm not entirely supportive of as it lessens the interchangeability of a lens use to a different manufacturer's camera body. Imagine if Canon lenses couldn't be adapted for use on Sony a7 bodies because the body wouldn't have the "formula" to correct the distortion? That would have limited many potential photographers from trying Sony.

Link | Posted on Mar 19, 2018 at 17:40 UTC as 80th comment | 5 replies
In reply to:

riknash: Techphobia says;
Rickrolling
Definition - What does Rickrolling mean?

Rickrolling is an internet meme that involves duping a person into clicking a URL or watching a spliced video that contains the 1987 Rick Astley song “Never Gonna Give You Up.” This internet meme primarly ran its course between 2007 and 2009.

Did FStoppers link to this video in their video?

Oops,Techopedia.

Link | Posted on Mar 8, 2018 at 16:24 UTC

Techphobia says;
Rickrolling
Definition - What does Rickrolling mean?

Rickrolling is an internet meme that involves duping a person into clicking a URL or watching a spliced video that contains the 1987 Rick Astley song “Never Gonna Give You Up.” This internet meme primarly ran its course between 2007 and 2009.

Did FStoppers link to this video in their video?

Link | Posted on Mar 8, 2018 at 16:23 UTC as 9th comment | 3 replies
In reply to:

roblumba: He's used a Hassleblad , doesn't want the weight of a DSLR. But from his pictures, he clearly likes portraits that isolate the subject with shallow DOF. Sounds like he should try a Leica with a 35 or 50 lux and get an even wider range of documentary photos, showing subjects among their dwellings. Perhaps including interiors where low light would look horrible on an iPhone.

It's too bad he hasn't tried other options. He proves to be an excellent photographer that handicaps himself with lesser tools.

Link | Posted on Feb 6, 2018 at 14:11 UTC
In reply to:

centerpunch: Dear Carey, I would like to apologize for all the commenters who seem to be personally offended by the idea that different people are, well, different.

Years ago I bought $4K of Canon DSLR + lenses. and also bought an FZ-200. After two years, I finally realized that although the DSLR (obviously) took better photos, I literally never used it. Sold it all via ebay. Kept the superzoom. I have taken thousands of great photos with that camera, although none suitable for NatGeo.

Recently wanted to upgrade, and I almost fell into the same trap. Fortunately I rented the Fujifilm X-T2 and lenses I was lusting after before buying them. The next day I returned the rental stuff and bought an RX10 IV- which is definitely the right camera for me when my phone isn't the right idea.

Bottom line: The best camera is the one you will use.

P.S. I think your dad's photos clearly show his expertise, even if you couldn't use them on a billboard.

You can use them on a billboard. No one stands two feet from the sign.

Link | Posted on Feb 6, 2018 at 14:07 UTC
In reply to:

biggles266: The pictures look fine viewed on a mobile device. Viewed on a larger screen they look average. Viewed at closer to 100% they look absolutely awful - like a watercolour painting.

So this article actually succeeded in turning me off the iPhone 8. Why would I want to go on a big trip with a camera that takes photos as bad as that? If you ever need to crop into a photo, or want to print it large, you will realize that your images now look poor. And these photos were taken in good light. Imagine if the light had been bad...!

The photographer in the article has a good eye though. I recommend he get a nice, small mirrorless camera so he can still travel light but get some proper quality images.

How can any smartphone be better as a camera than any real camera using current technology in both? The laws of physics suggest that any magic performed on the smartphone that improves the image could also be performed on the real camera to improve its photos.
There are a limited quantity of photons from which either device can use to create the image. The single purpose camera has the distinct advantage of a larger sensor, thus gathering more photons and far more flexibility with many designs of 'lensing' the photons to the sensor. A good dedicated point-n-shoot should be very capable of capturing far better images and be just as convenient to carry around.

Link | Posted on Feb 6, 2018 at 13:58 UTC
In reply to:

Arca45Swiss: I think the parks should outright ban any and all workshops.

@Sao6116
No idea how much the workshops add to the economy. Most goes to those who run the workshops, commercial outfits that are there to profit from those that travel to see the natural beauty of the location. The workshops are simply a business model that prioritizes people who pay money to them over private citizens who choose not to use their workshops. It's a bit like net neutrality these days. Pay extra money, get better internet access. Pay the commercial operator and you can have extra herd rights to inconvenience everyone else.

Link | Posted on Feb 3, 2018 at 16:24 UTC

People can be hugely inconsiderate on public scenic trails. The workshops are extra inconvenience that everyone has to deal with on overcrowded pathways and scenic points, particularly when the participants extend their personal space to include tripods. It gets even worse when dogs are brought along and the space of the human plus leash plus dog has to be considered along with the 'spoiled' area should they defecate. They should have stuck to their rules and outlawed tripods for commercial groups. Failing that, only allowed tripods on specific days or time of day when congestion is less of a problem.

Link | Posted on Feb 3, 2018 at 16:13 UTC as 3rd comment
In reply to:

Sezano: Steven is my brother. If the movie is good, the iPhone shooting gets props. If not, hey good for trying. What did you do meantime?

There's a lot of movies that aren't all that good made with expensive gear. This one looks quite promising and it's using cheap ugly cameraphones. Its success is based upon its own merits, the sum of all the components that were used to produce the final product.
I do wonder why bother using a cameraphone? What happens when someone calls the phone, did production stop? What happens if a new model comes out and you feel the urge to upgrade, while in the middle of the shooting schedule? Wouldn't a dedicated camera be a better tool?

Link | Posted on Feb 3, 2018 at 14:29 UTC
In reply to:

CosminMunteanu: When you think how many believe the camera makes the photo or the movie throwing money on the window and then get frustrated because their neighbour creates better photos, better movies with way older gear that the one they have. Iphone cound have been replaced by any other actual smartphone brand. The result would have been about the same.
It is not about what you can have or take but what can you give and share. As already was proofed the one that handles/controls the camera/s counts. The rest is just... watching. ;) Funny how the classics already said it way before the digital became the norm.

It never hurts to use the very best. Its true that today's cameraphone is much better than yesterday's super 8 film, but honestly, I have greater expectations of the technical aspects of today's movies.

Link | Posted on Feb 3, 2018 at 14:16 UTC

Is there a discussion of the technical aspects required to shoot this movie using the smartphone camera?

Link | Posted on Feb 3, 2018 at 14:08 UTC as 15th comment
In reply to:

shooter45: Professional nature wildlife photographer Brad Hill just gave his initial insight about this lens. Read his post and find out.

Brad suggests he can purchase several prime lenses for the price of this one. I'm dubious that he could do so. The Nikkor 500mm f/4 has a Canadian price tag of $12,900. I must have missed his point.

Link | Posted on Jan 11, 2018 at 03:20 UTC
Total: 175, showing: 1 – 20
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