Bill Bentley

Lives in Canada British Columbia, Canada
Joined on Sep 13, 2004

Comments

Total: 356, showing: 341 – 356
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In reply to:

Bodhi Dharma Zen: did it lost the T3i remote flash trigger?

No. It mentions in the article that the built-in flash can active slave flash units.

Link | Posted on Jun 8, 2012 at 16:54 UTC
In reply to:

attomole: Is't it about time Canon consolidated there DSLR camera name conventions word wide, why do they cary on with the rebel brand in the USA and Eos XXX branding in the ROW? we are all pretty much reading the same stuff these days, its just confusing.

Totally agree. I HATE the Rebel X branding, even though I bought the XT and will almost certainly upgrade to this. I suppose one could always order from the UK but there are additional expenses, possible hassles with this. Plus I have a large Best Buy GC waiting to be used up on this.

Link | Posted on Jun 8, 2012 at 16:50 UTC
On article Just Posted: Sony DSC-RX100 preview with sample images (640 comments in total)
In reply to:

Plastek: Hotshoe on a compact that you can hide in your hands.

Am I suppose to hold a thing like that by flash gun, or a camera?
People asking for a hotshoe on something this size should smash their heads into a wall.

You guys are thinking Canon 580 EX though. We're talking about a small flash and EVF like the one for the NEX-5N.

http://www.imaging-resource.com/PRODS/NEX5/ZFLASHANIM_500.GIF

http://cdn4.mos.techradar.com///Review%20images/PhotoRadar/Sony/NEX%205N/sony-nex-5n-front-380-75.jpg

I don't want to buy into the NEX system though. I just want a camera like this one (RAW, some zoom, good IQ, pocketable for 75%+ of the time I'm not using the accessories) with the flexibility to add some accessories if required/wanted.

Link | Posted on Jun 7, 2012 at 15:28 UTC
On article Just Posted: Sony DSC-RX100 preview with sample images (640 comments in total)
In reply to:

T3: People who so adamantly want to use a hotshoe flash with this camera, have you stopped to consider how the handling would be if you mounted a hotshoe flash onto such a compact camera? I think when people finally put this camera into their hands and realize who small/light it is, they'll realize who awkward it would be to mount a hotshoe flash onto this camera. Essentially, it's more or less the same size as a Canon S100, which is darn small. Even a compact two-battery hotshoe flash would be fairly large on a camera that is about the size of an S100. Forget about putting a four-battery flash on it.

Besides, of the enthusiast compacts that do have hotshoes, I wonder how many of those users actually use a hotshoe flash on those cameras. Probably not many. But at least those cameras, like the Fuji X10, Oly ZX-1, and Canon G-series, all have larger bodies where a hotshoe flash is a bit less awkward and off-balancing.

A small add-on flash like the one used with the NEX-5N would have been fine for this imo. Same for the add-on EVF for the NEX-5N too, although it's quite expensive imo. A hot shoe would not have affected the size or cost very much imo. But it would have given this camera that much more flexibility. You can't just say buy NEX-5N then because they are two very different tools, given the IL aspect of NEX-5N. I think this camera with the hot shoe options (small external microphone too?) could have been a real winner as a 75%+ of the time DSLR substitute. Without them it's a non-starter for me.

Link | Posted on Jun 7, 2012 at 04:35 UTC
On article Just Posted: Canon PowerShot SX150 IS review (85 comments in total)
In reply to:

Sean Nelson: I find it frustrating that your reviews of AA-powered cameras never properly explain the battery options:

- Alkalines are for emergency use because they can be bought anywhere and retain their charge for decades. But they drain quickly during actual use in high current devices such as digital cameras and you should never use them as a "normal" choice for your camera.

- Lithium batteries (the non-rechargeable ones) have extremely long shelf life and a very high capacity. My experience is that you can get a couple of thousand shots out of them. They're expensive, but perfect if you're going on a trip where recharging opportunities won't be available.

(continued next post...)

Excellent post Sean. I have a Panny LZ5 as my 3rd camera and have used all 3 of the battery scenarios you described. I'll gladly take the small additional weight for the versatility that AA's provide. Not to mention they are much less expensive than buying a second OEM lithium battery on those cameras that don't use AA's.

Link | Posted on May 15, 2012 at 06:09 UTC
In reply to:

LoganVii: I'm thinking on buying a camera bag, what would you recommend, a backpack or a shoulder bag?

I went to the LowePro site and checked out the FastPack. In watching the video clip I don't see any way to access the contents without taking the pack off. I have a Slingshot 200 and it's very easy to slide around to the front of my body and remove the camera. I also don't find it difficult to carry. Certainly not any more difficult than a back pack.

Link | Posted on May 4, 2012 at 15:55 UTC
On article Pentax K-01 studio test shots published (145 comments in total)
In reply to:

dtra: lol, by the time anyone reads this, it'll probably be fixed, but I did Pentax change their name to Canon, and the K-01 to EOS 5D Mark III?

Well, I just read it too. lol

Link | Posted on May 3, 2012 at 01:06 UTC
In reply to:

Valiant Thor: I'm just a mid-grade prosumer and wanted to ask those posting here if this D3200 will most likely be on par with the Sony NEX-7 given the same or similar sensors? I have a few nice Nikon lenses and thought the D3200 would stack up pretty well against the NEX-7 for a nice carry-around camera and some video. Any constructive thoughts regarding the pros and cons of these similar cameras would be appreciated. Thanks!

3200 has smaller vf coverage and magnification.
3200 has fixed screen
NEX has bracketing
NEX has wireless included
Biggie is that NEX does 1080 @ 60fps

You can use the comparison tool. 3200 is loaded now.

Link | Posted on Apr 19, 2012 at 21:57 UTC

Wireless really needs to be built-in imo. Little advantage when at home to have to open the side flap and insert the dongle. Might as well be a cable then unless you want to hold your camera in the living room. And as for on the road, it's yet another thing to bring and potentially lose or break.

Link | Posted on Apr 19, 2012 at 21:21 UTC as 62nd comment
In reply to:

Ashley Pomeroy: It's a shame they couldn't build the wireless thing into the body. That's the way things are going. I've always maintained that entry-level photographers generally *need* pro-calibre cameras; they need fast, reliable autofocus to capture their kids, they need excellent high-ISO and flash metering for parties, and they need a built-in wireless transmitter to get the photos to Facebook. Until recently the only cameras that could do those things were pro-level, but now things are changing.

Entry-level camera buyers are essentially photojournalists, taking and sharing images of real life - maybe not whilst being shot at, but real life nonetheless. Something that future generations might relate to. Rather than boring seascapes and awful HDR rubbish that will die and be forgotten. The amateurs and the pros are alive; the people in the middle - with their tripods and graduated filters and waffling blog posts about their workflow - they're the dead ones. Dead inside.

Wow. Sounds like a piece of you died on the inside a while ago. All kinds of pros use tripods and filters. And have a workflow. And as for the rest of us dying souls it's called a hobby.

Link | Posted on Apr 19, 2012 at 21:16 UTC
In reply to:

sparky52t: I can't imagine being an engineer putting together a camera like this. These days, what feature to leave out is as important as what feature to put in.

I'm pretty sure it's the marketing guys who decide what features make it or get left out. The engineers would happily find a way to fit everything in. It's what they live for. :-)

Link | Posted on Apr 12, 2012 at 20:05 UTC
In reply to:

Malcolm Hopkinson: Rather than produce a new model every 6-9 months, most photographers would prefer to see a new camera in 15-18 months but with real progress and innovation. For example, the GX1 is just a step up from G2 and G3 and core Panasonic supporters are likely to feel shortchanged. With the mirrorless market on a roll and Canon's effort probably appearing this Summer/Fall, our observations are that Panasonic need to pay attention to the camera using public. Incidentally, for first hand experience, have used/ traded GF1 and currently have GF2, G2, G3 and Olympus E620 in the immediate family's camera assortment. How much longer we have to virtually give away one camera to purchase another of the latest upgrades?

Smartphone photography was included in my thought process when posting my original comment about the masses jumping on board. The lines are being blurred more and more with every passing day. I'm too cheap to pay a $50+ monthly cell bill (Canada) so I can have a decent camera on board, but I'm looking forward to the day when a quality 8MP+ camera appears on a prepaid phone. Then I will truly have my camera with me 90-100% of the time.

Link | Posted on Apr 5, 2012 at 22:23 UTC
In reply to:

Malcolm Hopkinson: Rather than produce a new model every 6-9 months, most photographers would prefer to see a new camera in 15-18 months but with real progress and innovation. For example, the GX1 is just a step up from G2 and G3 and core Panasonic supporters are likely to feel shortchanged. With the mirrorless market on a roll and Canon's effort probably appearing this Summer/Fall, our observations are that Panasonic need to pay attention to the camera using public. Incidentally, for first hand experience, have used/ traded GF1 and currently have GF2, G2, G3 and Olympus E620 in the immediate family's camera assortment. How much longer we have to virtually give away one camera to purchase another of the latest upgrades?

I think the challenge for the companies is that there are masses of people jumping into photography these days and the competition is so tough that waiting 15-18 months between releases would be excruciatingly long for them. These incremental releases, while somewhat annoying for us more serious photogs, means the stores constantly have "new" products to display and the companies continue to grab incremental sales too.

Link | Posted on Apr 5, 2012 at 16:05 UTC
In reply to:

George Sears: Panasonic has had some very confusing (aggressive) pricing on the GF3. It was offered around Christmas with the kit zoom for $300, with a two lens system under $500. Panasonic seems to get minimal credit for iA, though Jeff Keller calls it the best auto system around. It's a camera to use on iA, basically, even if you use raw to touch things up a bit. This series seems to attract a lot of criticism, but if you buy these cameras at the right price, they are pretty impressive. Panasonic came out with the 1080 P60 Camcorders a couple of years back. The first year, the models (differentiated by memory mostly) blew reviewers away. The second year was a minor refresh, and the reviewers turned against Panasonic. Now, the third year, Panasonic does another minor refresh. But, it's a value camcorder like this is a value camera. I completely respect what Panasonic does, and own their cameras. They do a lot of good things and they can be cutting edge. It's your money.

We recently returned from a holiday in AZ and NV on which I did not bring my Canon DSLR kit. Instead we opted to bring the FZ28 I had bought for my son a few years ago. He is a 16 y.o. budding photographer and we both had fun trying out all the manual and auto modes of this camera. It was really my first time using it. Bracketing for HDR was so easy. I must say that I was VERY impressed with the images that the iA setting put out. I was a joy to have such a light weight camera to carry around too. I am seriously looking at something like this or the GH2 (or similar) as my main camera in the near future.

Link | Posted on Apr 5, 2012 at 15:53 UTC
On article Instagram app arrives for Android (29 comments in total)
In reply to:

DotCom Editor: Isn't Nik Snapseed much better?

Maybe. Not available on Android yet though. Just went to their site and all the links on their gallery page are broken.

Link | Posted on Apr 3, 2012 at 18:53 UTC
In reply to:

photoaddict: Wow! I am extremely impressed with all the sample images shown from that camera! I could buy it just for a camera!

I really love the 800 ISO sample - it looks a lot more "analog" and more organic. Love the colors.

Agreed. And it's sharp too. Sharp enough to catch that stray nose hair. ;-)

Link | Posted on Feb 27, 2012 at 21:45 UTC
Total: 356, showing: 341 – 356
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