BorisK1

Lives in United States MI, United States
Works as a Software engineer
Joined on May 7, 2004

BorisK1's recent activity

  • That's the very gradient I was talking about, and that's exactly why the size of the BH makes a difference. The smaller the event horizon, the higher is the gradient. I haven't heard of any ...
  • The supermassive black hole at the center of our galaxy was first identified based on the orbits of the surrounding stars, observed over decades. The stars were orbiting an extremely massive ...
  • If the force is applied to all your atoms simultaneously and equally, there's nothing to feel - you just accelerate, but you're still in freefall. You only feel things when there's a difference in ...
  • Oh, the force would be insanely strong. But it wouldn't be noticeable to a freefalling object, just like astronauts don't notice Earth gravity in orbit. It's the gradient of the force that makes ...
  • That one is pretty amazing, yes. The space station takes ninety minutes, with orbital radius of 4200 miles. The Moon takes twenty eight days to orbit Earth at 230,000 miles. This star's orbit is ...
  • My understanding is that they can calculate the mass of the central object based on the orbital parameters of its satellite, so they can tell it's too heavy to be a neutron star. In addition, they ...
  • The black hole at the center of Milky Way has, amusingly enough, the density of water. About "navigating it" - what makes a big difference to the local observer, is not the strength of the ...
  • That is very impressive, thanks for the link!
  • Ah, I see. Well - quantum effects operate on the extremely small scale. There isn't a whole lot of history of observations there - it's all relatively new. EmDrive effect, on the other hand, is on ...
  • I thought we were talking about EmDrive in this subthread, no?
  • The science of physics is, at its very core, a way to summarise observations. People writing down what they see, and making notes of commonalities. If somebody makes an observation that disagrees ...
  • The physics we know today, doesn't allow for the reactionless drive. If and when this work demonstrates that it's possible, the textbooks will have to be updated. But it's a very big "if".
  • Yes, really. No idea what you mean by "quantum force" and how it could be a "source if energy". But if you're accelerating a mass by applying a force to it, you're expanding energy to do so. If ...
  • Right. They found extremely tiny, nonlinear thrust, that can be explained either by some tiny effect of their equipment somehow pushing against its environment, or by a loophole in the law of the ...
  • It didn't pass any new stage, no. Somebody published another paper that basically says they measured a tiny force, erratic (widely nonlinear as per the power setting of the magnetron) and near the ...
  • Replied in One.
    The nautical mile was originally defined as one minute of arc along a meridian of the Earth. https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mile#Nautical_mile
  • That's right. I was just having a bit of fun. Hey, while we're at it, why not build reactionless drive? I'll drag a crate of dumbbells from bow to stern, causing the ship to move forward a few ...
  • Finally read the link. Sorry, but unless I'm missing something, they don't appear to be talking about true gamma-rays. Here's the confusing turn of phrase: "The nuclear gamma-ray laser considered ...
  • They're talking about the power of the beam , not the laser. The light pressure (or in this case, thrust) of the beam is proportional to the power (in watts) of that beam. That means the wavelength ...
  • For simplicity, I was assuming a 100%-effective conversion of the Hawking radiation pressure into thrust. Yes, a smaller black hole will output more radiation - and it will be lighter (so the same ...
Activity older than 12 months is not displayed.
Total messages 5459
Threads started 160
Last post 6 days ago
Total comments 363
Total likes 311
Last post 1 month ago
Total reviews 0
Entries 0
Votes cast 0
Photos uploaded 0