BorisK1

Lives in United States MI, United States
Works as a Software engineer
Joined on May 7, 2004

Comments

Total: 374, showing: 1 – 20
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On article Microsoft launches new generation Surface Pro (24 comments in total)
In reply to:

BorisK1: If I recall correctly, it comes with a "Windows 10 S" - a severely locked down version of the OS, that only runs applications installed through Windows Store, and disables a lot of built-in software (like the command prompt).

Despite what some irate users say on the forums, the "S" stands for "streamlined".

The OS can be upgraded to a less-restricted Windows 10 (currently, an upgrade to "Pro" level is free).

Ah, I see. "Surface" vs "Surface Pro". Thanks for the clarification!

Link | Posted on May 23, 2017 at 22:29 UTC
On article Microsoft launches new generation Surface Pro (24 comments in total)

If I recall correctly, it comes with a "Windows 10 S" - a severely locked down version of the OS, that only runs applications installed through Windows Store, and disables a lot of built-in software (like the command prompt).

Despite what some irate users say on the forums, the "S" stands for "streamlined".

The OS can be upgraded to a less-restricted Windows 10 (currently, an upgrade to "Pro" level is free).

Link | Posted on May 23, 2017 at 16:15 UTC as 2nd comment | 4 replies
In reply to:

Mark Chan: Apparently the people that diss this camera don't have any experience with the form factor and how 'potentially' big this latest iteration is, with the following:

1. Pro Capture Mode available (how far back is a question)
2. Optical Image Stabilisation (previous ones were electronic)
3. Sensors and 'tracking when camera is off'

The price is much steeper than previous, but honestly Olympus is actually integrating m43 tech into this, AND keeping the form factor allows for previous owners of lens extensions to upgrade. The Pro Capture and optical IS is in my view justification enough.

Inserting a larger sensor will change all of this and increase the price too much; and flush all the investments in the system down the toilet.

I hope they push out an Olympus Tracker witht he Optical IS.

Owners of TG-2 to TG-4 can all benefit!

Like others said, it's really sensor-shift stabilization - but it's considered to be nearly as effective as "optical", and much better than "electronic" (which is a fancy name for raising the ISO).
The reason it's not as good as in the large cameras, is twofold. First, the camera is built into a tiny body, and doesn't have much power to spare - so the actuators that move the sensor can't match the power and range of motion of full-size camera bodies.
Second, a small and light camera without a viewfinder naturally encourages the "snap-and-move-on", often even one-handed shooting.
If you try shooting with it like you would with a DSLR (deliberately stabilize your elbows, hold your breath, keep the camera steady for half a second *after* you took the shot) - you'll see that the IS will suddenly work much better.
Also, "tough" cameras are for adventurers. If you just got off your bike/kayak/skateboard, your heart rate, breathing rate, and adrenaline are high. So your hands *will* shake.

Link | Posted on May 19, 2017 at 15:11 UTC
In reply to:

Barry Stewart: I've been freelance shooting and writing for a small town newspaper in western Canada for over 30 years — and my TG-3 and off-camera FL-50r flash helped me earn my first Gold award in sports photography.

Sure, my E-M1 would have gotten a sharper shot (though the pdf below doesn't give full justice to the TG-3's quality)... but it might have been ruined from the immersion. Tough cameras can do tough work. RAW capability (in TG-4 and 5), amongst other features, have me hankering for a TG-5.

See page 29:
http://bccommunitynews.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/Ma-2017-awards-booklet-final-lowestres.pdf

One nice thing that Olympus did with TG-4, was remove the "Art" and "Collage" positions off the control wheel, replacing them with much more useful "microscope" and custom-2 modes.

Link | Posted on May 18, 2017 at 17:14 UTC
In reply to:

rgs_45: Looks great. Will wait for actual users review. This could replace my old Nikon AW120. Like others have mentioned, I wish it has a bigger sensor, a 1/1.7 would have been great, bigger would be better. But from the images taken so far, I'm liking what I'm seeing :)

One thing, I hope the silicone jacket accessory will come in red or black to match body instead of the clear/translucent one that doesn't match anything. As good looking as the camera is, I don't want an accessory that will make it "ugly".

Looks notwithstanding, the silicon sleeve keeps a screen protector in place (screen protectors tend to peel off when the camera is wet). I didn't have a screen protector on my TG-1, and an area of the screen that kept rubbing against the fabric, became a weak spot - it cracked when the camera landed on a pebble.

Link | Posted on May 18, 2017 at 17:06 UTC
In reply to:

John Banister: I wonder, will the extra ISO will keep the image quality nice while using a 1 stop filter for improving single shot dynamic range? It might be worth a check.

I see lots of complaints about the sensor size, but it seems to me that if they make the sensor larger and the glass enough larger to keep it fast, and they still want to keep the zoom and focus movement internal, then they would have to change the form factor and make something that competes with rugged video cameras like the Quad Proof Everio. Maybe that market is in their future, but it's not the one in which the TG-5 competes. On the other hand, a rugged little video camera with a really tough display hinge and a signature new feature, (like maybe 4K video in CinemaDNG) would certainly attract plenty of interest, and it might be attractive enough to overcome the sticker shock that's bound to accompany a non reputation ruining entry into the new market.

"I wonder, will the extra ISO will keep the image quality nice while using a 1 stop filter for improving single shot dynamic range? It might be worth a check."
The only way a filter can improve dynamic range, is if you use a split-density filter.

In addition to 1-stop iris aperture, TG series have a built-in 3-stop ND filter that is enabled when there's too much light.

"I see lots of complaints about the sensor size" - those are mostly coming from people who haven't been following the "rugged" cameras history. The weight and size of TG series is already near the upper edge for their role.

Currently, there are two ways to switch to a larger sensor while keeping their form factor. One to use a *very* large sensor with *very* high resolution behind a fixed-FL lens, that would use purely digital zoom. Think 75mpix APS-C behind a 16mm lens - which wouldn't be cheap. The other way is to use an array of multiple cameras, like PelicanImaging is trying to do (which has own challenges).

Link | Posted on May 18, 2017 at 15:02 UTC
In reply to:

solarider: Good start so far, thanks for the initial info and pics.

Can you spoil us a bit and let us know whether the 12 mpx sensor does indeed improve the image? I imagine that it would, but what the hay :-)
.

Even if the sensor was still 16mp, it's still a newer model by about three years. Reduced resolution *plus* the newer model *plus* the upgraded image processor, should provide noticeable improvement. Don't expect miracles, but 1/2 stop benefit is not out of the question.

Link | Posted on May 18, 2017 at 14:50 UTC
In reply to:

Mark Chan: Apparently the people that diss this camera don't have any experience with the form factor and how 'potentially' big this latest iteration is, with the following:

1. Pro Capture Mode available (how far back is a question)
2. Optical Image Stabilisation (previous ones were electronic)
3. Sensors and 'tracking when camera is off'

The price is much steeper than previous, but honestly Olympus is actually integrating m43 tech into this, AND keeping the form factor allows for previous owners of lens extensions to upgrade. The Pro Capture and optical IS is in my view justification enough.

Inserting a larger sensor will change all of this and increase the price too much; and flush all the investments in the system down the toilet.

I hope they push out an Olympus Tracker witht he Optical IS.

Owners of TG-2 to TG-4 can all benefit!

All TG-series models, starting with TG-1, have optical image stabilization. Unless you mean for video.

Link | Posted on May 18, 2017 at 14:45 UTC
In reply to:

Mark Chan: I'd like to know whether they have fixed the sound made from the camera during video recording.

Are you referring to the "sewing machine" sound that the AF makes when recording video? Yes, it's a big problem - I have both TG-1 and TG-4, and they are both plagued by it. Even aside from the sound, the AF video performance of TG-4 is quite poor. It's a much bigger issue than the resolution. It's bad enough to ruin HD videos, so if it isn't fixed, 4K will be totally worthless.

Link | Posted on May 18, 2017 at 14:43 UTC
In reply to:

vegasdood: The TG4 has been a great extra camera for me and I consistently recommend to people wanting a great all-around great camera. Like most people, they refuse to read the manual and discover there are about 30 different shooting modes that really make this a great all-around PNS camera. I have no need to upgrade and the price point would probably scare the majority of newbies away as many people want to "look like" a photographer so they buy the really crappy DSLR kits from Costco at the same price point.

I went from TG-1 to TG-4, and the TG-4 fixed a part of TG-1 behavior that was a *major* annoyance. In bright light, TG-1 "preferred" to enable the 3-stop ND filter when it could use faster exposure time, with no way to override the camera choice. So you get motion blur in broad daylight.

The only real annoyance I have with the TG-4, is the video AF performance. If (and it's a big if) TG-5 gets it right, I might be tempted.

Link | Posted on May 17, 2017 at 16:07 UTC

"3 Megapixel* CMOS sensor"
Refreshing ;-)

Link | Posted on Apr 6, 2017 at 14:19 UTC as 29th comment | 1 reply
On article Flat metalenses now work with a range of colors (43 comments in total)
In reply to:

bubblyboo: Visible light spectrum is around 300nm in total. This only works for a 60nm block . Still a long ways away.

This could work in a camera array. Five cameras would cover the visible spectrum. However, each camera would need a separate narrow-band filter, which aren't exactly cheap.

Link | Posted on Feb 9, 2017 at 22:57 UTC
On article Medium-format mirrorless: Hasselblad unveils X1D (1179 comments in total)
In reply to:

windmillgolfer: I guess this will appeal to those with a specialist, professional interest but, as ogl has already commented. This is of academic/technology interest only to most.

I think you're vastly underestimating the market. A tonne of people works out to about twelve of them (eleven, if it's US males). I'd say, it could easily be twice that number!

Sorry, couldn't resist :)

Link | Posted on Jun 22, 2016 at 16:09 UTC
On article Bolt-on 21: Fujifilm WCL-X70 sample images (52 comments in total)
In reply to:

GabrielZ: Everybody's saying the quality is great. But look at the photo above, the one before you click on the 'View our gallery...' Look at the extreme distortion of the house and telephone pole. They're both literally leaning over!

Ah, I see what you mean now. Yes, a thorough test will use a test target, or it might miss something. And the target would need to be photographed at various zoom settings and at various distances - so you'd end up needing a bunch of targets, printed in various sizes.

Good thing I'm not a camera lab! :)

Link | Posted on Jun 18, 2016 at 21:59 UTC
On article Bolt-on 21: Fujifilm WCL-X70 sample images (52 comments in total)
In reply to:

GabrielZ: Everybody's saying the quality is great. But look at the photo above, the one before you click on the 'View our gallery...' Look at the extreme distortion of the house and telephone pole. They're both literally leaning over!

Yes, some zoom lenses have complex distortion:
http://static.bhphotovideo.com/explora/sites/default/files/mustache_0.jpg
But if a straight line remains straight, you're good, there's no distortion.

Link | Posted on Jun 18, 2016 at 01:06 UTC
On article Bolt-on 21: Fujifilm WCL-X70 sample images (52 comments in total)
In reply to:

GabrielZ: Everybody's saying the quality is great. But look at the photo above, the one before you click on the 'View our gallery...' Look at the extreme distortion of the house and telephone pole. They're both literally leaning over!

"If it is very important for you and if you will buy the product only if it doesn't have distortion,then my advice is to search for a real distortion test of the product.Or you will never be sure by analyzing these samples."
The only distortion here that can be the lense's fault is if the straight lines look curved. Things rotated or leaning over are the photographer's fault, not the lense's. This image has straight lines, enough to judge the amount of distortion - very little.

Link | Posted on Jun 17, 2016 at 21:01 UTC

Now, are there any other muscles that clench at dramatic moments that GoPro is supposed to capture? Something that wouldn't interfere with hanging on for dear life? People would pay money to see an IndieGoGo campaign video...

Link | Posted on Jun 17, 2016 at 00:40 UTC as 7th comment
In reply to:

Sdaniella: finally!
a native 43d AF lens that has fov (12mm) and dof (f1.4) with appeal to make 43sys an genuine option ...
it may not be what I have hoped for: 12mm f0.7 (FF: 24mm F1.4) to maximize shallow dof flexibility to match FF capabilities, but it's better than nothing
bonus: rectilinear WA, too
... even though it may be too late in coming (it's 2016 June)

now all that needs improvement
are 43-sys camera sensors...

UWA close-up portraits are more like caricature than "interesting and excellent". A bit of a niche, to say the least. But I guess, to each his own...

Link | Posted on Jun 16, 2016 at 00:47 UTC
In reply to:

Sdaniella: finally!
a native 43d AF lens that has fov (12mm) and dof (f1.4) with appeal to make 43sys an genuine option ...
it may not be what I have hoped for: 12mm f0.7 (FF: 24mm F1.4) to maximize shallow dof flexibility to match FF capabilities, but it's better than nothing
bonus: rectilinear WA, too
... even though it may be too late in coming (it's 2016 June)

now all that needs improvement
are 43-sys camera sensors...

Just out of curiosity, what kind of wide-angle shots would call for shallow DOF?

Link | Posted on Jun 15, 2016 at 16:02 UTC
On article Bolt-on 21: Fujifilm WCL-X70 sample images (52 comments in total)
In reply to:

GabrielZ: Everybody's saying the quality is great. But look at the photo above, the one before you click on the 'View our gallery...' Look at the extreme distortion of the house and telephone pole. They're both literally leaning over!

Perspective distortion has a very distinctive look, easily recognizable here. Fisheye distortion has its own look, not present in this image.
Perspective distortion is not caused by a lens defect, unless it's a tilt-shift lens.
Now, about the horizon line being "almost" at the center: Remember, this is an UWA lens. If you're looking at the image at normal viewing distance, the angle of view is severely compressed compared to what the lens actually saw. If the camera was leaning 20 degrees, it will look like a (roughly) 12 degrees lean.

Link | Posted on Jun 14, 2016 at 14:55 UTC
Total: 374, showing: 1 – 20
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