BorisK1

Lives in United States MI, United States
Works as a Software engineer
Joined on May 7, 2004

Comments

Total: 388, showing: 1 – 20
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In reply to:

cpugourou: In France it is totally forbidden and heavily punished (5% of the turnover) for manufacturers to program the death of a product. Like for printers, washing machines etc.

Buy a ink printer in france and it last a decade. Buy one in usa and try to keep it running for a couple of years !

Apple is already under a huge pressure regarding taxes and a lawsuit by the goverment will be underway in january about this battery scandal.

My photo inkjet works just fine (a Canon, bought in 2011), except there's no driver support for it in Windows 10 (or Linux, for that matter). One of the reasons I've been keeping a Win 7 desktop next to it.

Link | Posted on Dec 29, 2017 at 14:57 UTC
In reply to:

elee1967: One thing I like about TG-5 is that it can be USB charged. Not sure whether W300 is the same.

It wasn't just a USB connector. It carried an analog video feed too, so you could view pictures on a TV.

Link | Posted on Dec 18, 2017 at 16:22 UTC
In reply to:

elee1967: One thing I like about TG-5 is that it can be USB charged. Not sure whether W300 is the same.

A waterproof camera really calls for wireless charging. Most of the diving/snorkeling destinations have wet climates. If you induction- charge and use Wi-Fi for file transfers, you can avoid opening the camera during the entire trip. That means no issues with condensation, and no sand on the seals.

Pentax had a rugged model with induction charging, but for whatever reason, nobody else followed suit. Which is unfortunate.

Link | Posted on Dec 17, 2017 at 17:26 UTC
In reply to:

chrisby: Why are rugged cameras (Olympus, Nikon, Canon, Pana) still so crippled? There should be no problem to install a bigger sensor, at least 1/1,7 type; Tv, Av, P and M and perhaps a ND filter would lead to a great all weather camera. I use a Panasonic TS3 since years for extreme conditions, wating for a better successor, in particular for low light conditions. Whenever a new rugged camera is introduced, I look at the specification and think: oh no, everything remains the same.

"There’s another underwater camera with a 1” sensor and prime lens but the name escapes me. But it’s mentioned in just about every single rugged camera thread."

DC2000 by Sea Life.

Link | Posted on Dec 17, 2017 at 17:08 UTC
In reply to:

chrisby: Why are rugged cameras (Olympus, Nikon, Canon, Pana) still so crippled? There should be no problem to install a bigger sensor, at least 1/1,7 type; Tv, Av, P and M and perhaps a ND filter would lead to a great all weather camera. I use a Panasonic TS3 since years for extreme conditions, wating for a better successor, in particular for low light conditions. Whenever a new rugged camera is introduced, I look at the specification and think: oh no, everything remains the same.

Two reasons.

First, it's hard technically. Trying to fit a zoom lens into a narrow rigid box places a lot of constraints on the lens design. The modern 1" compacts get around this by using telescoping "collapsible" lenses, but those are impossible to waterproof.

Second, there's not enough money in the compact cameras market to drive the serious R&D that producing such a camera would require. *All* "tough cams" released over the last five years, were minor updates.

Link | Posted on Dec 17, 2017 at 16:50 UTC
In reply to:

Shlomo Goldwasser: Time for at least a 1inch sensor?

The "tough cams" are one of the very few remaining categories of fixed-lens cameras that still sell in any numbers, primarily to the "active-lifestyle" users - skiers, climbers, kayakers, etc. A waterproof large-bodied fixed lens camera won't sell to the same category. Nobody will mass-produce a camera without a market.

Besides, what you're describing, can be easily achieved by an RX-100 in a waterproof case.

Link | Posted on Dec 13, 2017 at 04:10 UTC
In reply to:

Shlomo Goldwasser: Time for at least a 1inch sensor?

The existing 1" digicams use collapsible lenses that expand an extra inch or two when the camera is turned on. Try to waterproof that lens, and it's no longer compact.

Link | Posted on Dec 12, 2017 at 02:32 UTC
In reply to:

cosinaphile: love the idea of a tough camera .... why has no one in the many decades made one with at least the minimum "enthusiast sensor of 1 \1.7 or better a 2\3 like fuji x30
or Nokia phones of the past sized sensor ... also the lenses are merely good if at all never great lenses

genuinely wondering

There's another factor at play. In economic terms, the compact camera is on life support. Very few new models come out, most of them with very minor upgrades. The R&D money is gone. The TG series have been using the same lens for almost a decade.

Switching to a larger sensor would mean a complete redesign - and likely, a price increase. And the TG-5 is already near the top of what its target audience is willing to pay.

Link | Posted on Dec 10, 2017 at 17:21 UTC
In reply to:

Shlomo Goldwasser: Time for at least a 1inch sensor?

1" sensor and folded optical path don't mix. Large-sensor tough cams won't appear until either the flat optics come of age, or large sensors get enough resolution to implement a viable digital zoom with a fixed-FL lens.

To get 25-100mm-equivalent zoom with 3000x4000 pixels at the far end, they'd need a 12000x16000=192MP sensor. Not quite there yet.

Link | Posted on Dec 10, 2017 at 05:16 UTC
In reply to:

cosinaphile: love the idea of a tough camera .... why has no one in the many decades made one with at least the minimum "enthusiast sensor of 1 \1.7 or better a 2\3 like fuji x30
or Nokia phones of the past sized sensor ... also the lenses are merely good if at all never great lenses

genuinely wondering

"Tough cameras" follow a formula - a pocket-sized rectangular box of a camera, that offers optical zoom.

This is achieved by using a periscope-like optical design, also known as "folded optics". Which is a technical marvel - but also a compromise, that puts restrictions on the size of the sensor and limits the optical quality of the lens.

Link | Posted on Dec 10, 2017 at 05:05 UTC
In reply to:

justmeMN: "freezeproof to -10°C/+14°F" -DPR

In Minnesota USA, that doesn't qualify as freezeproof. Not even close. :-)

> and since it’s sealed condensation issues are unlikely

With sealed cameras, you get condensation issues all the time. It's a common complaint. Moist, warm air enters the camera + camera body cools below the dew point = the lens fogs up.

The way to prevent it is store the camera overnight in a Ziploc baggie with an open battery door and a pack of desiccant next to it.

Link | Posted on Dec 9, 2017 at 20:29 UTC
In reply to:

tinternaut: About time we had a Tough that comes either with a 1” sensor or even Four Thirds (e.g. a mean looking variant of the LX100). Ummm.. Yes, I think I’ve written the same here before now. That’s not to say the Tough 5 isn’t a fine camera - I just think Olympus is missing a trick.

Without a zoom lens, it will be another niche product. With a zoom, it will be much larger.

The many 1' compacts currently on the market, all have collapsible optics, that extend a couple inches outside the cameras body when the camera is turned on. Can't have that in a rugged cam.

Link | Posted on Dec 9, 2017 at 20:18 UTC
On article Video: Nikon D7500 first look (416 comments in total)
In reply to:

glennwithtwo: Nice camera - only three things wrong: there's no grip, it doesn't have a grip, and the grip is missing.

@GarysInSoCal More likely, without wireless it will have to use an external cable:
https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/71ax4WUhEXL._SL1500_.jpg

Link | Posted on Jun 8, 2017 at 20:48 UTC
On article Video: Nikon D7500 first look (416 comments in total)
In reply to:

glennwithtwo: Nice camera - only three things wrong: there's no grip, it doesn't have a grip, and the grip is missing.

"how do you imagine the third party manufacturers to connect the grip to the camera?"
Low-energy Bluetooth. Or Wi-Fi, or USB.

Link | Posted on Jun 8, 2017 at 17:35 UTC
On article Microsoft launches new generation Surface Pro (24 comments in total)
In reply to:

BorisK1: If I recall correctly, it comes with a "Windows 10 S" - a severely locked down version of the OS, that only runs applications installed through Windows Store, and disables a lot of built-in software (like the command prompt).

Despite what some irate users say on the forums, the "S" stands for "streamlined".

The OS can be upgraded to a less-restricted Windows 10 (currently, an upgrade to "Pro" level is free).

Ah, I see. "Surface" vs "Surface Pro". Thanks for the clarification!

Link | Posted on May 23, 2017 at 22:29 UTC
On article Microsoft launches new generation Surface Pro (24 comments in total)

If I recall correctly, it comes with a "Windows 10 S" - a severely locked down version of the OS, that only runs applications installed through Windows Store, and disables a lot of built-in software (like the command prompt).

Despite what some irate users say on the forums, the "S" stands for "streamlined".

The OS can be upgraded to a less-restricted Windows 10 (currently, an upgrade to "Pro" level is free).

Link | Posted on May 23, 2017 at 16:15 UTC as 2nd comment | 4 replies
In reply to:

Mark Chan: Apparently the people that diss this camera don't have any experience with the form factor and how 'potentially' big this latest iteration is, with the following:

1. Pro Capture Mode available (how far back is a question)
2. Optical Image Stabilisation (previous ones were electronic)
3. Sensors and 'tracking when camera is off'

The price is much steeper than previous, but honestly Olympus is actually integrating m43 tech into this, AND keeping the form factor allows for previous owners of lens extensions to upgrade. The Pro Capture and optical IS is in my view justification enough.

Inserting a larger sensor will change all of this and increase the price too much; and flush all the investments in the system down the toilet.

I hope they push out an Olympus Tracker witht he Optical IS.

Owners of TG-2 to TG-4 can all benefit!

Like others said, it's really sensor-shift stabilization - but it's considered to be nearly as effective as "optical", and much better than "electronic" (which is a fancy name for raising the ISO).
The reason it's not as good as in the large cameras, is twofold. First, the camera is built into a tiny body, and doesn't have much power to spare - so the actuators that move the sensor can't match the power and range of motion of full-size camera bodies.
Second, a small and light camera without a viewfinder naturally encourages the "snap-and-move-on", often even one-handed shooting.
If you try shooting with it like you would with a DSLR (deliberately stabilize your elbows, hold your breath, keep the camera steady for half a second *after* you took the shot) - you'll see that the IS will suddenly work much better.
Also, "tough" cameras are for adventurers. If you just got off your bike/kayak/skateboard, your heart rate, breathing rate, and adrenaline are high. So your hands *will* shake.

Link | Posted on May 19, 2017 at 15:11 UTC
In reply to:

Barry Stewart: I've been freelance shooting and writing for a small town newspaper in western Canada for over 30 years — and my TG-3 and off-camera FL-50r flash helped me earn my first Gold award in sports photography.

Sure, my E-M1 would have gotten a sharper shot (though the pdf below doesn't give full justice to the TG-3's quality)... but it might have been ruined from the immersion. Tough cameras can do tough work. RAW capability (in TG-4 and 5), amongst other features, have me hankering for a TG-5.

See page 29:
http://bccommunitynews.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/Ma-2017-awards-booklet-final-lowestres.pdf

One nice thing that Olympus did with TG-4, was remove the "Art" and "Collage" positions off the control wheel, replacing them with much more useful "microscope" and custom-2 modes.

Link | Posted on May 18, 2017 at 17:14 UTC
In reply to:

rgs_45: Looks great. Will wait for actual users review. This could replace my old Nikon AW120. Like others have mentioned, I wish it has a bigger sensor, a 1/1.7 would have been great, bigger would be better. But from the images taken so far, I'm liking what I'm seeing :)

One thing, I hope the silicone jacket accessory will come in red or black to match body instead of the clear/translucent one that doesn't match anything. As good looking as the camera is, I don't want an accessory that will make it "ugly".

Looks notwithstanding, the silicon sleeve keeps a screen protector in place (screen protectors tend to peel off when the camera is wet). I didn't have a screen protector on my TG-1, and an area of the screen that kept rubbing against the fabric, became a weak spot - it cracked when the camera landed on a pebble.

Link | Posted on May 18, 2017 at 17:06 UTC
In reply to:

John Banister: I wonder, will the extra ISO will keep the image quality nice while using a 1 stop filter for improving single shot dynamic range? It might be worth a check.

I see lots of complaints about the sensor size, but it seems to me that if they make the sensor larger and the glass enough larger to keep it fast, and they still want to keep the zoom and focus movement internal, then they would have to change the form factor and make something that competes with rugged video cameras like the Quad Proof Everio. Maybe that market is in their future, but it's not the one in which the TG-5 competes. On the other hand, a rugged little video camera with a really tough display hinge and a signature new feature, (like maybe 4K video in CinemaDNG) would certainly attract plenty of interest, and it might be attractive enough to overcome the sticker shock that's bound to accompany a non reputation ruining entry into the new market.

"I wonder, will the extra ISO will keep the image quality nice while using a 1 stop filter for improving single shot dynamic range? It might be worth a check."
The only way a filter can improve dynamic range, is if you use a split-density filter.

In addition to 1-stop iris aperture, TG series have a built-in 3-stop ND filter that is enabled when there's too much light.

"I see lots of complaints about the sensor size" - those are mostly coming from people who haven't been following the "rugged" cameras history. The weight and size of TG series is already near the upper edge for their role.

Currently, there are two ways to switch to a larger sensor while keeping their form factor. One to use a *very* large sensor with *very* high resolution behind a fixed-FL lens, that would use purely digital zoom. Think 75mpix APS-C behind a 16mm lens - which wouldn't be cheap. The other way is to use an array of multiple cameras, like PelicanImaging is trying to do (which has own challenges).

Link | Posted on May 18, 2017 at 15:02 UTC
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