geepondy

Lives in United States United States
Joined on Feb 7, 2003

Comments

Total: 12, showing: 1 – 12
On article 2017 Roundup: Enthusiast Long Zoom Cameras (276 comments in total)
In reply to:

Mike FL: >>>> "This [FZ1000} makes it an excellent travel camera, particularly for those once-in-a-lifetime trips".

It is not. A best travel cam should have some kind of weather sealing.

Those companies are always very ambiguous in their weather resistant claims. Can it handle a few drops of water? Can you use it in a driving rain or snow storm? In the "weather proof" cameras, they specify exactly the stated specifications but not so with these "weather resistant" cameras.

Link | Posted on Jun 9, 2017 at 21:30 UTC
On article Panasonic DC-ZS70 (TZ90) sample gallery (56 comments in total)
In reply to:

orion1983: They really should have gone back to 12MP wit a new sensor instead of pumping it to 18MP. Too much grainy noise even at low ISO settings. And too much texture being eaten up. Also very bad blurred and noisy contrasty edges. Really disappointing TO ME. Am hoping for a 12MP successor, as 18MP with a 1/2.3" chip can never reach a 12MP quality.

I have compromised vision and generally hesitate to post critical analysis but I have to agree, these look really horrible when viewed at 100 percent for the reasons you stated. Blurry, grainy images with very little fine detail. Is it the sensor or the lens?

Link | Posted on May 4, 2017 at 12:20 UTC
On article 2017 Roundup: Compact Enthusiast Zoom Cameras (505 comments in total)
In reply to:

tkbslc: I recently picked the G7X II over the LX10. The LX10 has a headline grabbing f1.4 aperture, but it drops to f1.8 after 1mm of zoom! And then it is nearly a stop slower at 34mm equivalent vs the G7X II lens. I think most people shoot 28-50mm more than they do 24mm, so I feel like the G7X has the faster lens in the real world.

On the long end, the bg blur potention for portraits at 100mm f2.8 is about 1.4x greater than 70mm f2.8. So it's almost like having a stop faster aperture there as well.

The G7X also has an nice built in grip on the front and thumbrest on the rear.

LX10 really only has 4K going for it. Too bad Canon can't seem to figure out that people want that in their cameras, because I think it has many dismissing an otherwise nearly perfect compact.

That's a very useful lens/aperture comparison. I own a G7X and my biggest gripe is it's relatively pedestrian focus and operation speed which has hampered me at times. I know G7X II is faster but is that mainly in the burst rate area? Still would not trade it for an LX10. Perplexed as well why Canon can't seem to do the 4K video thing on any of its cameras. Not a big deal to me personally but pretty much becoming the standard de facto.

Link | Posted on Apr 24, 2017 at 16:30 UTC
On article Throwback Thursday: Our first cameras (393 comments in total)
In reply to:

geepondy: First film camera as a kid was a Kodak Instamatic that took 120 film and used "magic cubes". As an adult I eventually made my way up to a Minolta XD-11 SLR. First digital was a Nikon CP900 in 1998, 1megpixel, $1000 and I sure was the envy of my friends. I later moved up to a CP990 and many since. I think Nikon ruled in the early days of relatively affordable digital cameras, say from 1998-2000 or so.

Yes, 126 cartridge film after you jogged my memory. Not great quality but better than the disc cameras that followed.

Link | Posted on Mar 16, 2017 at 16:46 UTC
On article Throwback Thursday: Our first cameras (393 comments in total)

First film camera as a kid was a Kodak Instamatic that took 120 film and used "magic cubes". As an adult I eventually made my way up to a Minolta XD-11 SLR. First digital was a Nikon CP900 in 1998, 1megpixel, $1000 and I sure was the envy of my friends. I later moved up to a CP990 and many since. I think Nikon ruled in the early days of relatively affordable digital cameras, say from 1998-2000 or so.

Link | Posted on Mar 16, 2017 at 14:50 UTC as 214th comment | 5 replies
On article DPReview Asks: What was your first camera? (766 comments in total)

Kodak Instamatic that took 120 film and used "magic cubes". Images were not sharp but better than those disc cameras which were terrible. First real camera, a Minolta SD-11. First digital camera, a Nikon CP900 which in my opinion was that camera that really started off consumer digital cameras.

Link | Posted on Nov 5, 2016 at 00:19 UTC as 293rd comment
On article Canon announces budget-friendly EOS Rebel T6 (1300D) (874 comments in total)

Can someone explain to me the specific target audience for this camera? Obviously no one positing here. Back in the day when I got my Rebel to upgrade from a point and shoot (Rebel 1000D), there basically weren't a lot of options for my particular price point. Now there are a plethora of mirrorless cameras and better DSLRs. I can only think of a Canon point and shoot user with blind Canon loyalty would consider this camera.

Link | Posted on Mar 11, 2016 at 01:06 UTC as 80th comment | 3 replies
On article Canon announces budget-friendly EOS Rebel T6 (1300D) (874 comments in total)
In reply to:

arhmatic: This should come with that oversized, excessively padded and compartmentalized camera bag, that most people will get anyway to carry this around.

LOL, bundled with the 70-300 lens.

Link | Posted on Mar 11, 2016 at 00:56 UTC
On article Inching forward? Canon PowerShot G5 X review posted (391 comments in total)

My the days of DP Review being accused of being Canon fanboys which used to happen on a regular basis, are long over. Nary a single camera seems to get top honors. The enthusiasts cameras are being accused of overall pedestrian handling (I agree) and the DSLRs are all being accused of inferior sensors compared to the competition. Canon is still number one in sales though, aren't they?

Link | Posted on Dec 18, 2015 at 02:35 UTC as 52nd comment | 1 reply

At least in the focal lengths used in the studio test shots, the real life image quality of all these cameras with the same sized sensor is so similar that I would pick one over the other for other features, not image quality.

Link | Posted on Jul 23, 2015 at 20:22 UTC as 13th comment | 1 reply
On article Sigma announces 18-300mm F/3.5-6.3 DC Macro OS HSM 'C' (36 comments in total)

I always read ho-hum reviews on these $400-600 DSLR super zoom lens so is one better off, just buying one of the better super zoom point and shoots in the same price range?

Link | Posted on Sep 14, 2014 at 00:36 UTC as 8th comment
In reply to:

MrTaikitso: Mid 1990s, I was given a Logitech Pixtura for a project (made by Kodak, and similar to the Apple digital camera). Whilst in vacation in Yosemite with my mother, I took 144 photos, the max it could hold. On the last day, to free up memory to take a few more shots, I selected DELETE, but because the camera had no display (other than a frame counter), there was no prompt, so I had no idea I had selected the wrong option. I erased all 144 photos, including some once in a life time shots, such as a chipmunk that hopped right up to me. I got a close up of his lovely face. Distraught, back at the motel I spent ages on the phone to Logitech support, to find out if there was a way to recover the files, hoping that like a computer, only the header data is altered. (I had hoped that by hooking it up to my laptop, I could recover them.) Alas, it was not possible. I was devastated. Today, this sort of thing is almost impossible thanks to clear on screen prompts, instant cloud backups etc.

My vote would be a Nikon CP900 in 1998. It was the first "real" consumer digicam in my opinion, offering a full meg of resolution and semi-affordable at $1000. I loved the swivel lens as well I got mine for $950 but $250 more for a 48 meg compact flash.

Link | Posted on Aug 22, 2013 at 00:42 UTC
Total: 12, showing: 1 – 12