Otaraka

Lives in United States United States
Joined on Sep 23, 2005

Comments

Total: 229, showing: 1 – 20
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In reply to:

MIC37: I want to see GoPro with the ability to use actual interchangeable lenses not the "modes".

The nearest to this so far is the Insta360 one, with modular units for each lens type. Not a bad idea, but seems to cost more and so far doesnt seem to be a threat to Gopro.

Link | Posted on Sep 21, 2021 at 05:42 UTC
In reply to:

Otaraka: I take the point but the competing tech long term is automatic subject acquisition. With the R6, you could have just been pressing the people AF button instead of manual AF acquisition.

Because eye AF depends on the human, and some of us arent as fast as they used to be when it comes to tracking things.

I dont think Im suggesting human direction isnt worthwhile, more about the means to get there. Using your eye as the director is great if only the 'target' matters, but Ill be interested to see if this increases tunnel vision issues for instance, whether the borders of the frame get harder or easier to monitor.

Link | Posted on Sep 20, 2021 at 22:50 UTC
In reply to:

Otaraka: I take the point but the competing tech long term is automatic subject acquisition. With the R6, you could have just been pressing the people AF button instead of manual AF acquisition.

Because eye AF depends on the human, and some of us arent as fast as they used to be when it comes to tracking things.

Bytes are cheap if the importance is to 'get the shot'. If Mr Lewis is overtaking, theres probably going to be 20+ happening anyway.

My point is more that once all this split second talk happens, lots of consumers arent that great at seeing all this fast decision making stuff, particularly as we get older, which is one reason why FPS has become part of the landscape rather than relying on human timing.

Which is also why the long term competing tech is automatic subject picture taking. There are a subset of people willing to invest in this, but I suspect they will remain so unless the usability improves markedly.

All conjecture of course, once I try it. But initial enthusiasm in the press is always worth treating with caution.

Link | Posted on Sep 20, 2021 at 20:53 UTC
In reply to:

Otaraka: I take the point but the competing tech long term is automatic subject acquisition. With the R6, you could have just been pressing the people AF button instead of manual AF acquisition.

Because eye AF depends on the human, and some of us arent as fast as they used to be when it comes to tracking things.

Im not talking specialist cases, Im more dubious about the 'trickle down' idea that this will become more mainstream over time.

Perhaps Im being too doubtful, I can just see the word 'gamechanger' being avoided but just dying to be used.

Link | Posted on Sep 20, 2021 at 00:08 UTC
In reply to:

Otaraka: I take the point but the competing tech long term is automatic subject acquisition. With the R6, you could have just been pressing the people AF button instead of manual AF acquisition.

Because eye AF depends on the human, and some of us arent as fast as they used to be when it comes to tracking things.

I can see the advantages for specialist cases, but when I see the calibration and the concern about still getting things wrong, it seems like a fair amount of investment. If its just about getting the right general area, trackpads already do a pretty good job for a lot less complexity, at 30fps you're even getting into it just taking pictures of all the subjects in the AF vicinity becomeing viable options.

Obviously its a bit 'spray and pray' as a concept, but bytes are cheap.

Link | Posted on Sep 19, 2021 at 23:49 UTC

I take the point but the competing tech long term is automatic subject acquisition. With the R6, you could have just been pressing the people AF button instead of manual AF acquisition.

Because eye AF depends on the human, and some of us arent as fast as they used to be when it comes to tracking things.

Link | Posted on Sep 19, 2021 at 22:29 UTC as 50th comment | 11 replies
In reply to:

zakk9: As others have pointed out, it's clearly inventing stuff. If this product is sold to authorities that would use it to identify people, it's becoming dangerous. On the man in the bottom example, key characteristics around his eye have been changed, even the size of the pupil. For photographers, there are already very good products available, like Topas Gigapixel AI, which actually makes things look like the original photo, only at higher resolution.

In the headline of the Google blog, they use the words "High Fidelity Image". High fidelity is not what this is, and that headline looks like an attempt to mislead readers into believing that it is something that it isn't.

Identikit and eye witness isnt exactly perfect either.

Obviously misuse and incorrect understandings are a concern, but there might be some room for being helpful as well.

Link | Posted on Aug 31, 2021 at 01:15 UTC
In reply to:

TN Args: And in two fell swoops, the whole idea that Sony cameras aren't as user-friendly as the old guard is put to the sword!

It was more a comment on how tough it is for field photographers employment-wise nowadays. I can see how it might be seen as a diss on Sony but it wasn't meant to be.

Link | Posted on Aug 24, 2021 at 08:07 UTC
In reply to:

TN Args: And in two fell swoops, the whole idea that Sony cameras aren't as user-friendly as the old guard is put to the sword!

I suspect any field photographer still employed these days would happily use a kodak brownie if it let them keep their job,

Link | Posted on Aug 24, 2021 at 01:31 UTC
In reply to:

Craig from Nevada: RRS charges $1,100 for an $1,100 tripod.

Got it--a premium tripod for a premium price.

I am okay with that.

I do too, but it appears to be a near exact copy of a manfrotto 410

Link | Posted on Aug 11, 2021 at 22:16 UTC
In reply to:

bolt2014: Why not compare some of the cheaper more affordable Chinese tripods?

Benro and Sunwayfoto make stuff at a similar level to Sirui in my view.

Link | Posted on Jul 11, 2021 at 07:07 UTC
In reply to:

MarioV: So many jealous comments, no doubt from those who probably consider themselves the worlds best photographers.
Just appreciate it for what it is. No need to assert your superiority every time something gets posted.

Im not a great photographer. We live in a world where so much is sold as the next greatest thing ever, that pushback can be expected if the claim doesnt seem to hold a lot of water.

Link | Posted on Jul 10, 2021 at 02:12 UTC
In reply to:

Kharan: Meh. Super mediocre. A waste of the great sensor on the R5, and worse than what I got with my RX10M4, which is indeed the better choice and buy for wildlife beginners.

Unless one already has the r5/r6 in which case its almost twice as much, in Oz anyhow. I agree that it could be a much better choice though, if considered in isolation.

Link | Posted on Jul 5, 2021 at 02:28 UTC
In reply to:

JasonTheBirder: I see a lot of people here have not talked to actual beginners in a long time. The Sony 200-600 is a great lens for the fairly serious enthusiast. However, the casual beginner is not going to want to lug that lens around. I shoot hours of birds every week, and I have actually talked to many beginners in the field. The vast majority of them want: to get a fun taste of long lens photography and not break the bank. And there is where this lens crushes the 200-600. I've seen so many of these lenses on the cameras of people just wanting to try out wildlife and of *those* people, no one had the 200-600.

A prime like this is perfect. I might not get everything, but when it does get something, it gives a pretty decent result. And 600mm is not that challenging especially on full-frame! 100% of the time I would recommend this lens over the 200-600 or 100-500 for ANY beginner just wanting to try out wildlife, especially those on a bit of a budget (which most people are).

"@otaraka: Point is that there is not one type of beginner there are many! "

Well yes, but the term can become meaningless in that beginners can buy anything, regardless of where they're at or how suitable it really is as a starting lens. I personally wouldnt recommend it as a starting buy to one unless they were very very clear about their needs. I do love my 800mm F11, but it is rather specialised.

Link | Posted on Jul 4, 2021 at 23:40 UTC
In reply to:

JasonTheBirder: I see a lot of people here have not talked to actual beginners in a long time. The Sony 200-600 is a great lens for the fairly serious enthusiast. However, the casual beginner is not going to want to lug that lens around. I shoot hours of birds every week, and I have actually talked to many beginners in the field. The vast majority of them want: to get a fun taste of long lens photography and not break the bank. And there is where this lens crushes the 200-600. I've seen so many of these lenses on the cameras of people just wanting to try out wildlife and of *those* people, no one had the 200-600.

A prime like this is perfect. I might not get everything, but when it does get something, it gives a pretty decent result. And 600mm is not that challenging especially on full-frame! 100% of the time I would recommend this lens over the 200-600 or 100-500 for ANY beginner just wanting to try out wildlife, especially those on a bit of a budget (which most people are).

"The status of being a beginner does not mean that one cannot afford one of these cameras."

Its less 'afford' and more how much of a leap most beginners make with a hobby that may or may not last. Yes some will go boots and all early on, most dont.

Link | Posted on Jul 4, 2021 at 07:05 UTC
In reply to:

JasonTheBirder: I see a lot of people here have not talked to actual beginners in a long time. The Sony 200-600 is a great lens for the fairly serious enthusiast. However, the casual beginner is not going to want to lug that lens around. I shoot hours of birds every week, and I have actually talked to many beginners in the field. The vast majority of them want: to get a fun taste of long lens photography and not break the bank. And there is where this lens crushes the 200-600. I've seen so many of these lenses on the cameras of people just wanting to try out wildlife and of *those* people, no one had the 200-600.

A prime like this is perfect. I might not get everything, but when it does get something, it gives a pretty decent result. And 600mm is not that challenging especially on full-frame! 100% of the time I would recommend this lens over the 200-600 or 100-500 for ANY beginner just wanting to try out wildlife, especially those on a bit of a budget (which most people are).

"Millions of great animal/bird photos were taken before introduction of animal/bird eye AF."

But less by beginners perhaps.

Its great that it auto-switches, but anyone buying an R5/R6 is making a bit of a commitment. Im sure some are 'beginners' but not too many.

Link | Posted on Jul 4, 2021 at 01:48 UTC
On article Why have cameras and lenses become so expensive? (673 comments in total)

The splitting of APS-C away from the RF mount makes it pretty clear that Canon doesnt want to risk people choosing low end cameras. Its not only about the cost of what they're making - its also the cost of the things they're choosing not to make, which probably could be a lot cheaper. In my view they're trying to anchor prices to previous levels rather than going lower.

Link | Posted on May 30, 2021 at 22:58 UTC as 156th comment
In reply to:

Sine_Nomine: IMO, I don't think this is an air pressure issue.
1. Where's all the pressure coming from?
2. In all of the photos, the damage is over one of the lenses, as if they extended out too far and hit the glass.
3. Mysterious air pressure is far more likely to pop out the entire glass, since the pressure is evenly distributed across the interior surface of the glass.
4. The break pattern is consistent with focused (no pun intended) physical pressure (see point 2). If it were air pressure, the break pattern should be much more random.

t could be physical pressure rather than air? Seems to be over the lenses, maybe something to do with how they fit/glue them.

Link | Posted on May 4, 2021 at 21:10 UTC
In reply to:

Djehuty: Doesn't seem as interesting as i thought it would be, they look like sterile hotels, was expecting something more flamboyant

If they're for sale they're be in showroom condition, ie pretty neutral.

Link | Posted on Apr 29, 2021 at 21:27 UTC
In reply to:

zakk9: "Ignorant man saved by useless app" would have been a more describing headline.

Before mobile phones, most people new that they should take a topographic map and a compass when hiking. Electronic devices are of no use unless one has a reliable power source available, like solar panels. Unfortunately, those electronic devices that people think they can rely on are also making us increasingly narrow minded.

Yes, I'm old fashioned, and I do miss those days when people didn't rely on Google and a battery for their survival.

The point was a map is only useful for not getting lost while communication covers many potential hazards. And why do you need these newfangled compasses and maps that can get damaged or lost anyhow, do it like the real self-reliant types did and just use the sun and the stars.

Link | Posted on Apr 17, 2021 at 21:31 UTC
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