Rod McD

Lives in Australia Australia
Joined on Jan 15, 2010

Comments

Total: 257, showing: 41 – 60
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On photo Black as a crow white as a cockatoo in the Black and White in Nature challenge (4 comments in total)

Great shot. Incredible luck to get a Raven and Sulphur Crested Cockatoo in the same spot and the same time..... and good exposure

Link | Posted on Mar 31, 2016 at 22:07 UTC as 1st comment

Another lens without a single marking on the barrel. Ugh. I thought Leica was all about giving photographers control.

Link | Posted on Mar 23, 2016 at 20:54 UTC as 31st comment | 1 reply
In reply to:

Rod McD: Good to see some interesting options emerging from Asian manufacturers. (I'm thinking of the German designed, Chinese made Iberits there.) I'm not sure why they haven't included some mirror-less mounts though at least they can be adapted. The only downside I can see is that the lens is rather large and heavy at 600gm+. AF? For a lens that appears to suit landscape, architecture and potentially astro photography? Who cares?

@Saurat. I know Europe is not in Asia. Read the article. The lens is marketed as Swiss and manufactured in Korea. (Which is why I made the analogous comment about the German marketed Iberits which are manufactured in China. Having a link to a European heritage appears to be the current strategy for new manufacturers to get more market traction than those who launch from their country of origin.) Your negative view about Americans is noted, not that I am an American.

Link | Posted on Mar 22, 2016 at 21:24 UTC

Good to see some interesting options emerging from Asian manufacturers. (I'm thinking of the German designed, Chinese made Iberits there.) I'm not sure why they haven't included some mirror-less mounts though at least they can be adapted. The only downside I can see is that the lens is rather large and heavy at 600gm+. AF? For a lens that appears to suit landscape, architecture and potentially astro photography? Who cares?

Link | Posted on Mar 21, 2016 at 21:20 UTC as 35th comment | 5 replies
On photo Farewell to a Legend. in the Jump jet challenge (7 comments in total)

Hi,
Great shot. That's a HS Harrier isn't it? Have they developed an upgraded/ replacement VTOL aircraft?

Thx, Rod

Link | Posted on Mar 18, 2016 at 10:18 UTC as 4th comment | 1 reply

Hi DPR,
Thanks for the review. Interesting lens. (They've also released a 2:1 macro you might take a look at.) I think you over-rate the difficulty of using MF lenses in your conclusion. It isn't that hard. Certainly Leica, Voigtlander and Zeiss don't think so. And who needs AF on a 15mm lens anyway?

Would it be possible for your lens database to be updated for all the new Chinese manufacturers - Venus/Laowa, Handevision, Mitakon, SLR Magic, Zhongyi etc. They may not be longstanding or mainstream (yet), but you have to hand it to them for trying some interesting products. They should be in there too. Thanks.

Link | Posted on Mar 13, 2016 at 23:07 UTC as 29th comment | 2 replies

The Canon EOS M MILC lags behind other mirror-less systems. Mr Tokura may hold the view that the EVF experience isn't the same as a prism (and he's right) and that mirror-less AF isn't as fast as DSLR AF (though the gap is closing). What he hasn't acknowledged is that for many people, the current 2.4mpx EVF technology and the current levels of mirror-less AF speed both work absolutely fine.
There is a very active enthusiast/pro market they could participate in somewhere between the EOS M and heavyweight pro DSLRs.

Link | Posted on Mar 3, 2016 at 22:12 UTC as 16th comment
On article UPDATED: CP+ 2016: shooting the Pentax K-1 in Yokohama (378 comments in total)
In reply to:

dbm305: Carey says ". In fact, for a good number of photographers, the increase in depth-of-field control is as much a disadvantage as it is an advantage."

I don't understand this; I can see how it might be no advantage, if you don't like thin DOF.

But disadvantage? You can stop down further on FF to get the same DOF as on smaller formants, and diffraction limiting sets in *at the same equivalent depths of field" Of course you are a smaller aperture, but then your sensor is larger, so that cancels out.

So your IQ should never be worse for equivalent depth of field, your IQ will be better if there is good light, and you have the option of thin DOF if you want it.

@Sweets. No that won't do. It might be the same lens but you'll have different FOV and DOF between full and cropped sensor modes. I don't think you can really test it without changing lenses to get the same composition, and then you've introduced other variables.

The real impact of this camera for landscapers using deep DOF is resolution. No APSC camera or the APSC mode on this camera offers 36mpx. But you will just have to stop down a little further. And further again for a sensor that's larger still like the 645Z. At each step the DR/noise issue should be neutral (assuming the sensor tech is the same).

Link | Posted on Mar 2, 2016 at 23:52 UTC
In reply to:

Rod McD: There's a fair bit to like in these three options, but why leave a built-in EVF out of the two wider versions? Very disappointing. It relegates them to arms length P&S viewing and shooting. There's an optional EVF. We don't know the cost yet but you can bet that they're more expensive together than the cameras would have been if an EVF had been been built in. Add-on EVFs tend to make cameras taller than a built in EVF, and they get lost, left at home, and block any flash shoes in use. Bad idea - please just give us a complete camera in the first place.

I didn't say it was the 'end of the world'. I said it was 'very disappointing' (to me, obviously). Many manufacturers have shown that a built-in EVF can be included at very little extra weight and cost on 1" cameras - eg Sony RX100, Panasonic LX100. And to many people the sheer utility of eye-level viewing is worth the handful of grams it adds. More so if one is using it as the main camera and not carrying a DSLR at all. The presence of the EVF will not hinder your time-lapse or astrophotography (AFAIK). I'm actually very interested in light weight hiking and travel, but the extra few grams of an EVF would make little difference to the size of my pack.

Link | Posted on Feb 23, 2016 at 22:00 UTC

I don't doubt that the 50-100 will be an excellent performer, but as an APSC lens, it's large and incredibly heavy at 1490gm for the short 2X FL range. That's more than three APSC (50mm, 75mm and 100mm) prime lenses of similar speed. You'd really have to need zoom flexibility to find that attractive. And it'll be rather 'in your face' for many subjects.

Link | Posted on Feb 23, 2016 at 07:38 UTC as 57th comment | 5 replies

There's a fair bit to like in these three options, but why leave a built-in EVF out of the two wider versions? Very disappointing. It relegates them to arms length P&S viewing and shooting. There's an optional EVF. We don't know the cost yet but you can bet that they're more expensive together than the cameras would have been if an EVF had been been built in. Add-on EVFs tend to make cameras taller than a built in EVF, and they get lost, left at home, and block any flash shoes in use. Bad idea - please just give us a complete camera in the first place.

Link | Posted on Feb 23, 2016 at 07:17 UTC as 134th comment | 2 replies
In reply to:

Rod McD: Very interesting. High res and competitively priced (though we've yet to see the price in AUD). It may launch with several recently released or new FF zooms, but the success of their FF system will be determined by the whole lens range. We have to wait still longer to see what new primes will be offered. If you're into WA primes there's nothing available new in 20, 24, 28, or 35mm and (the 31mm Limited is very expensive). It's a large and expensive zoom or nothing. So, I can't be an early adopter. I hope Pentax release some new high grade sealed primes of moderate aperture (in accord with their tradition) in the near future.

Sorry, I meant from Pentax. And AFAIK, the Sigma Art 35/1.4 A is the only one available in Pentax mount. Not their more recent ones. I wouldn't want them anyway. Sigma's wider Art lenses weigh just shy of a kilogram each. On the K1 that'd make a 2 kilogram camera by the time you put a strap and a lens cap on. That's a very heavy IQ/weight equation.

Link | Posted on Feb 18, 2016 at 02:05 UTC
On photo Crystal Mill (condensed) in the A babbling brook challenge (36 comments in total)

Hi Dfish,
Great image! And an interesting historic building in its landscape setting.

Congratulations on your win. Would you mind sharing with us the exposure set up please? The sun is included in the image and I would have typically thought the subject facing the viewer would have been in deep shadow. I'm wondering how the very even exposure was achieved. Was it lit by light reflected from early morning cloud or cliffs opposite the sun? Or are we seeing the effects of some HDR or perhaps stacking. Whichever, it's a great shot.

Thanks, Rod

Link | Posted on Feb 18, 2016 at 01:05 UTC as 16th comment | 1 reply

Very interesting. High res and competitively priced (though we've yet to see the price in AUD). It may launch with several recently released or new FF zooms, but the success of their FF system will be determined by the whole lens range. We have to wait still longer to see what new primes will be offered. If you're into WA primes there's nothing available new in 20, 24, 28, or 35mm and (the 31mm Limited is very expensive). It's a large and expensive zoom or nothing. So, I can't be an early adopter. I hope Pentax release some new high grade sealed primes of moderate aperture (in accord with their tradition) in the near future.

Link | Posted on Feb 17, 2016 at 23:37 UTC as 67th comment | 5 replies
On article Ultra-compact: Sony Cyber-shot RX1R II review (549 comments in total)
In reply to:

Rod McD: Not for me. I prefer built-in EVFs on any camera and would like interchangeable lenses even if only a handful of small primes. I have a Fuji XT1 and for FF in Sony I'd rather buy the A7rII and smaller primes. I've tried the single FL pathway in several film/sensor/FL variants and it just doesn't work me.

Thanks. I stand corrected. I somewhere missed the fact that they'd added one since the first RX1R

Link | Posted on Feb 16, 2016 at 00:23 UTC
On article Ultra-compact: Sony Cyber-shot RX1R II review (549 comments in total)

Not for me. I prefer built-in EVFs on any camera and would like interchangeable lenses even if only a handful of small primes. I have a Fuji XT1 and for FF in Sony I'd rather buy the A7rII and smaller primes. I've tried the single FL pathway in several film/sensor/FL variants and it just doesn't work me.

Link | Posted on Feb 15, 2016 at 23:32 UTC as 109th comment | 3 replies

I'm not into 'street' at all. (Perhaps just a little when I travel in other countries.) But I am into cycling, hiking and kayaking and shooting largely landscapes on the way. So, the X70 potentially appeals in a different way.

I can see the X70 as lightweight back up to my ILC and as a single ultra-light option. The fact that it doesn't change size at all might also make it good possibility for kayaking if a third party offers one of those inexpensive polycarbonate housings. It might be one of the few larger sensored cameras in a housing to stay reasonably small.

It's a concern that a camera claimed to be 'tack sharp' may not have been - at least in your sample. There have been other samples from Beta cameras posted on the web that have looked very good in terms of cross frame sharpness. No doubt we'll learn more.....

Link | Posted on Feb 11, 2016 at 21:39 UTC as 50th comment | 1 reply
On article Design, looks and desire: Olympus does it again (391 comments in total)

Even if photographers look first at function, I have to agree that camera looks have a great bearing on our choices. Read a few DPR posts and it's obvious that they're a key aspect for many people. And it only gets worse - there are just as many posts on strap design, Italian leather half cases, flash shoe cover design and soft release buttons. Enough for a whole psychiatric conference.

OTOH there is a tendency to write off the success of retro designs as nostalgia where I think that people forget that analogue knobs and dials were actually the product of decades of ergonomic development that actually worked - and very well. Digital technology made DSLR scroll wheels possible, but it's matter of personal preference which works better at the individual level.

I bought a Fuji XT1 for a host of reasons, including the features and lens range, but modest size and analogue control were up there amongst them. Yeah, OK, it looks fine too.

Link | Posted on Feb 1, 2016 at 22:25 UTC as 54th comment
On photo Riddler time in the Wildlife - King fisher challenge (17 comments in total)

Congratulations! Top shot. Out of interest, could you tell us how you chose your prefocus, given that the exact spot for birds dive and exit from the water would be dependent on wherever the fish was? Even if the bird often hunted from the same perch, I assume that you couldn't place much reliance on DOF with a 300mm lens..... it would be very thin indeed.

Thanks.

Rod

Link | Posted on Feb 1, 2016 at 00:37 UTC as 16th comment

I'm all in favor of some larger sensor compacts emerging in the so called "rugged" waterproof and shockproof market. I'm tired of using small-sensor compacts when I go kayaking. OTOH, $3K is too pricey for me and rather a lot to risk in those activities. Most of them leak in the end - there's not a decent "o" ring amongst them and the manufacturers won't fix leaks under the warranty. I'll pin my hopes on someone developing one of those small polycarbonate waterproof shells for the Fuji X70.

Link | Posted on Jan 22, 2016 at 08:22 UTC as 13th comment
Total: 257, showing: 41 – 60
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