Rod McD

Lives in Australia Australia
Joined on Jan 15, 2010

Comments

Total: 257, showing: 21 – 40
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In reply to:

Rod McD: Great video thanks. Every time I see one of these tear downs of modern Sony (Fuji, Nikon, whatever) AF, OIS lenses, the more I'm impressed with the engineering. Unfortunately at the same time, the more convinced I am that the lens is as complex a device as the camera and just adds to the potential to wear and/or go wrong. Who will be able to repair them and how long will the parts be available? To me, it makes traditional helical MF lenses like Loxia, Samyang and Voigtlander look more attractive.

No-one knows with certainty the future availability of anything. Why would you have expected me to? It's always about assumption and projection based on the present. Nothing new there. An array of lubricants suitable for lens helices is available today. I predicted that they'll be there tomorrow. Let's see.

Perhaps you could test your projection too - find some recently made and broken AF OIS 18-55 lenses, put them aside, and try to get parts and repair services for them in ten years, again at twenty years, and again in perhaps thirty years time - as old as my oldest MF lens I can still have lubricated. There you go - a longitudinal methodology for you to test your hypothesis. I've already had to toss out digital gear less than six years old for lack of parts for repair, so while I wish you well with that, my recent present experience is perhaps the basis for projecting some doubts........

Link | Posted on Aug 5, 2016 at 09:14 UTC
In reply to:

Rod McD: Great video thanks. Every time I see one of these tear downs of modern Sony (Fuji, Nikon, whatever) AF, OIS lenses, the more I'm impressed with the engineering. Unfortunately at the same time, the more convinced I am that the lens is as complex a device as the camera and just adds to the potential to wear and/or go wrong. Who will be able to repair them and how long will the parts be available? To me, it makes traditional helical MF lenses like Loxia, Samyang and Voigtlander look more attractive.

I'm wondering exactly what your point about assumption is and why you make it. We cannot know the future and we only ever make predictions about the future based on what we know about the present. And since the need for long life, low temperature, non-gassing lubricants is so widely needed across industry for new cameras, new lenses, telescopes, microscopes, rifle sights, theodolites, electronic and medical equipment, etc, etc, etc, I think people who need them will find them available. Assumption? I'm writing here today, not 2026, so yes. Would it deter me from buying an MF lens? Not in the least.

Link | Posted on Aug 4, 2016 at 23:01 UTC
In reply to:

Rod McD: Great video thanks. Every time I see one of these tear downs of modern Sony (Fuji, Nikon, whatever) AF, OIS lenses, the more I'm impressed with the engineering. Unfortunately at the same time, the more convinced I am that the lens is as complex a device as the camera and just adds to the potential to wear and/or go wrong. Who will be able to repair them and how long will the parts be available? To me, it makes traditional helical MF lenses like Loxia, Samyang and Voigtlander look more attractive.

It can go either way - lubricants can dry out, wear out or evaporate and lenses can consequently either stiffen up or become too loose. Others are fine forty years later. I'm not personally involved in repair. I send mine to a local repairman in Adelaide, South Australia. (Don't know where you are.) I've watched him do my lenses. It seems to involve removing the mount, extending the lens to expose the helix and slowly working his way around the helix, placing specific grease into the helix channels with a syringe fitted with a large bore needle. He's very careful about the choice of lubricant - viscosity, sublimation etc. Can't tell you more than that, I'm afraid. I'd be confident that a competent repairman specialising in the repair of mechanical cameras, lenses, telescopes, microscopes, etc would have access to suitable lubricants.

Link | Posted on Aug 4, 2016 at 13:03 UTC
On photo Road of Many Turns in the The winding road challenge (20 comments in total)

Wow, that's quite something. What a feat of road-building. And an extraordinary place. Was the image shot from another point on the same road? Or a nearby peak or helicopter? Whatever, it's a great shot.

Link | Posted on Aug 4, 2016 at 11:14 UTC as 5th comment | 2 replies
In reply to:

Rod McD: Great video thanks. Every time I see one of these tear downs of modern Sony (Fuji, Nikon, whatever) AF, OIS lenses, the more I'm impressed with the engineering. Unfortunately at the same time, the more convinced I am that the lens is as complex a device as the camera and just adds to the potential to wear and/or go wrong. Who will be able to repair them and how long will the parts be available? To me, it makes traditional helical MF lenses like Loxia, Samyang and Voigtlander look more attractive.

@ MrScrooge The lubricants are still readily available today and I would expect that they'll remain so as long as there's a demand. One look at e-Bay will tell you that there's a thriving usage of older lenses and since they last very well, and since new MF lenses are still being made, I'd expect supply to continue. And if it doesn't, industry is so diverse, that there are bound to be excellent substitutes. I have both AF and MF glass, and I fully expect my MF primes to outlast my modern and complex AF OIS zooms.

Link | Posted on Aug 3, 2016 at 23:03 UTC

Great video thanks. Every time I see one of these tear downs of modern Sony (Fuji, Nikon, whatever) AF, OIS lenses, the more I'm impressed with the engineering. Unfortunately at the same time, the more convinced I am that the lens is as complex a device as the camera and just adds to the potential to wear and/or go wrong. Who will be able to repair them and how long will the parts be available? To me, it makes traditional helical MF lenses like Loxia, Samyang and Voigtlander look more attractive.

Link | Posted on Aug 2, 2016 at 23:08 UTC as 19th comment | 14 replies

Haven't Voigtlander been selling 10/5.6, 12/5.6 and 15/4.5 designed-for-digital FF rectilinear lenses in Leica M & Sony FE mount for the last year or so?..... Edit - just saw it's the widest f2.8 lens......fair enough.

Link | Posted on Jul 26, 2016 at 07:50 UTC as 14th comment
On article SLIK introduces SLIK LITE tripod line (35 comments in total)

I like their 634CF for a backpacking tripod and these look closely related. I can't say that a light in the bottom of the center column looks all that exciting. Once you've set up the camera, there can only be one place the light can be shone - downwards. It'll be quite useless for illuminating camera and lens controls. Is there anyone who sets out to do night photography who doesn't take a head torch or handheld torch with them?

And would somebody please inform Slik USA that the internet is an international phenomenon - showing both imperial and metric specs in their site might just help potential buyers consider their products.

Link | Posted on Jul 21, 2016 at 09:27 UTC as 7th comment | 2 replies
On article Remembering Fan Ho: 1931-2016 (35 comments in total)

Brilliant photography. Thank you.

Link | Posted on Jun 30, 2016 at 23:42 UTC as 3rd comment
On article Medium-format mirrorless: Hasselblad unveils X1D (1188 comments in total)
In reply to:

Rod McD: Interesting. No doubt priced to compete with the 50mpx Pentax 645Z and far lighter. It will appeal to many. Having said that, I don't think I'd personally enjoy the design. The body and lenses are virtually devoid of the dedicated controls that I prefer and the lenses have no scales or markings at all. Buyers will face a limited lens range and no ability to adapt other lenses. Not for me. It'll be interesting to compare it with the much-tipped Fuji if the rumors are borne out later this year.

@ surlezi Who said they preferred a non-existing system? What I actually wrote was that it will be "interesting to compare it with the much-tipped Fuji if the rumors are borne out later this year".

Link | Posted on Jun 22, 2016 at 21:48 UTC
On article Medium-format mirrorless: Hasselblad unveils X1D (1188 comments in total)

Interesting. No doubt priced to compete with the 50mpx Pentax 645Z and far lighter. It will appeal to many. Having said that, I don't think I'd personally enjoy the design. The body and lenses are virtually devoid of the dedicated controls that I prefer and the lenses have no scales or markings at all. Buyers will face a limited lens range and no ability to adapt other lenses. Not for me. It'll be interesting to compare it with the much-tipped Fuji if the rumors are borne out later this year.

Link | Posted on Jun 22, 2016 at 13:59 UTC as 256th comment | 3 replies

I can't help but think that at that size and weight, it kind of defeats the purpose of choosing a smaller sensored system. There's not much saving over an equivalent APSC lens . Eg the Fuji 16mm f1.4 weighs 375g and takes a 67mm filter. Or go FF and choose a 24/2.8 - it might even be smaller.

Link | Posted on Jun 15, 2016 at 12:41 UTC as 13th comment | 3 replies

I've been trying the M mount version of the same CV 15/4.5 III with an adapter on my APSC XT1 and it's brilliant. I don't need AF in a lens that wide. The fact that it's slow has been irrelevant because for landscape with a WA lens, I inevitably stop down. It's sharp and contrasty with very low distortion and it's resistant to flare. It's far smaller and less expensive than the very fast Fuji 16mm. I couldn't ask for more - other than a version in native Fuji mount.

Link | Posted on May 19, 2016 at 22:24 UTC as 4th comment
In reply to:

Rod McD: Interesting to see their development of AF and disappointing that they appear to have abandoned any decent AF-compatible mechanical implementation for MF when it's needed. I guess it's focus by wire with no mechanical infinity stop, and I see no distance and DOF scales.

I can understand longer lenses not needing scales, but a 14mm (in particular) not to feature even a distance and DOF scale? To me WA lens images are all about what happens in the foreground, so their omission from the 14mm is unforgivable. Give me a super wide MF Loxia or Voigtlander 15mm any day. I'm not buying any AF lenses without good MF implementation.

There are AF, linear-motor-driven lenses with engraved scales and mechanical MFD and infinity stops. Fuji makes three of which I've got two. I'm considering also using a Sony A7, but I'd go for the Loxias and perhaps the Batis specifically for the control over focusing and DOF.

One can of course also go fully MF - Samyang, Voigtlander and Zeiss make plenty. Leica too, but beyond my budget.

Link | Posted on May 4, 2016 at 10:15 UTC
In reply to:

Rod McD: Interesting to see their development of AF and disappointing that they appear to have abandoned any decent AF-compatible mechanical implementation for MF when it's needed. I guess it's focus by wire with no mechanical infinity stop, and I see no distance and DOF scales.

I can understand longer lenses not needing scales, but a 14mm (in particular) not to feature even a distance and DOF scale? To me WA lens images are all about what happens in the foreground, so their omission from the 14mm is unforgivable. Give me a super wide MF Loxia or Voigtlander 15mm any day. I'm not buying any AF lenses without good MF implementation.

I know full well that these are designed for mirror-less camera. I've got one. And I know full well that the AF in these lenses is electronically driven. So what? My point is that AF doesn't cater adequately for all situations. There are plenty of AF lenses that have electronic AF AND a mechanical implementation for manual focus (when its needed) that is better than these Samyang lenses because they (ie the Samyangs) don't have stops for infinity and close focus and because they don't have focusing distance and DOF scales. I'm just saying that it's a pity that Samyang didn't offer those features. You may not need them, but for others they may be very useful.

Link | Posted on May 4, 2016 at 06:45 UTC
In reply to:

Rod McD: Interesting to see their development of AF and disappointing that they appear to have abandoned any decent AF-compatible mechanical implementation for MF when it's needed. I guess it's focus by wire with no mechanical infinity stop, and I see no distance and DOF scales.

I can understand longer lenses not needing scales, but a 14mm (in particular) not to feature even a distance and DOF scale? To me WA lens images are all about what happens in the foreground, so their omission from the 14mm is unforgivable. Give me a super wide MF Loxia or Voigtlander 15mm any day. I'm not buying any AF lenses without good MF implementation.

Focus peaking certainly won't help you get precise infinity focus with an UWA lens. Everything highlights red (or whatever) because the DOF is deep. It's a long way from good enough for (say) aerial photography or night sky photography, both of which require exact infinity focus. Yes magnification does help, but accurate infinity registration works just as well and faster.

And neither focus peaking nor magnification will tell you anything about the DOF. Eg, if you're looking for deep DOF for the classic near-far landscape, you need to know the hyperfocal distances and only a lens scale, tables or an app will give you that. It disappoints me that manufacturers are dropping them just to build to a price.

Link | Posted on May 4, 2016 at 04:06 UTC

Interesting to see their development of AF and disappointing that they appear to have abandoned any decent AF-compatible mechanical implementation for MF when it's needed. I guess it's focus by wire with no mechanical infinity stop, and I see no distance and DOF scales.

I can understand longer lenses not needing scales, but a 14mm (in particular) not to feature even a distance and DOF scale? To me WA lens images are all about what happens in the foreground, so their omission from the 14mm is unforgivable. Give me a super wide MF Loxia or Voigtlander 15mm any day. I'm not buying any AF lenses without good MF implementation.

Link | Posted on May 3, 2016 at 23:46 UTC as 43rd comment | 7 replies

Great article - thanks for the link. It's always good to know more about how our tools function. In a converse kind of way, it also makes me appreciate the mechanical elegance and simplicity of some of my MF lenses. I've a couple of Voigtlanders focused by conventional helixes and they're beautiful to use. I've a feeling they'll outlast all my focus by wire lenses......

Link | Posted on Apr 22, 2016 at 10:48 UTC as 4th comment
On article Upwardly mobile: Sony a6300 Review (2156 comments in total)

When I read the pros and cons, it all comes out looking excellent to me. If you're a stills photographer who shoots at a moderate pace, who couldn't care less about video, high frame rates or the absence of a touch screen, almost the entire list of 'cons' in the conclusion simply disappears.

Yes Sony could develop better menus and a more cohesive system of high grade APSC lenses.

Link | Posted on Apr 7, 2016 at 05:07 UTC as 200th comment

This concept would bring the benefit of data, menus, and other facilities into DSLR VFs, but I can't help but think that it is an extra complexity and cost.

Many people have suggested that the chief advantage of mirror-less cameras in the long run will be cheaper production costs. This patent takes DSLRs in the opposite direction. Still, there's still a very active demand for DSLRs at the moment, so perhaps there will always be those willing to pay extra for the benefits of a prism, however sophisticated it might have to become to offer the benefits people come to expect because they're offered by mirror-less cameras.

Link | Posted on Apr 1, 2016 at 06:07 UTC as 43rd comment
Total: 257, showing: 21 – 40
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