Rod McD

Lives in Australia Australia
Joined on Jan 15, 2010

Comments

Total: 302, showing: 1 – 20
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In reply to:

Rod McD: Thanks for the link. LR's tech articles are always a worthy read. I'd be interested to see an extension of the study to test the impact of CPLs on IQ, as they did with clear filters. I've never had any doubts that my polarizers have been polarizing.... I can see the effect. However, given all the debate (religion?) regarding clear and UV filters and the potential impact they may have on IQ, one would speculate that a CPL (which is a more complex structure) would have more.

Appreciated. Thank you.

Link | Posted on Sep 19, 2017 at 13:37 UTC
In reply to:

Rod McD: Thanks for the link. LR's tech articles are always a worthy read. I'd be interested to see an extension of the study to test the impact of CPLs on IQ, as they did with clear filters. I've never had any doubts that my polarizers have been polarizing.... I can see the effect. However, given all the debate (religion?) regarding clear and UV filters and the potential impact they may have on IQ, one would speculate that a CPL (which is a more complex structure) would have more.

Surely surface flatness is only part of the story? As I understand it, there's a metal foil and adhesives in the CPL sandwich. How about actually evaluating the impact on images from a few benchmark lenses of different FL, with and without a CPL? Or are we to simply take as read the view that clear filters may or may not have an impact on IQ, but all CPLs are just fine?

Link | Posted on Sep 19, 2017 at 08:10 UTC

Thanks for the link. LR's tech articles are always a worthy read. I'd be interested to see an extension of the study to test the impact of CPLs on IQ, as they did with clear filters. I've never had any doubts that my polarizers have been polarizing.... I can see the effect. However, given all the debate (religion?) regarding clear and UV filters and the potential impact they may have on IQ, one would speculate that a CPL (which is a more complex structure) would have more.

Link | Posted on Sep 18, 2017 at 23:19 UTC as 29th comment | 5 replies
On photo common kingfisher in the Your Best Photo of the Week challenge (4 comments in total)

Good shot! Cheers, Rod

Link | Posted on Sep 11, 2017 at 07:36 UTC as 2nd comment | 1 reply
In reply to:

neverendinglight: The new 80mm Macro lens seems a little disappointing (especially when compared to existing 60mm Macro and 90mm F2 and Sony 90mm) but...

...Let's talk about the 200mm F2 WR OIS! That's a lens to get stoked about! Will it be less than $1700 though?

Hmmm...... There is no 200/2 available from any manufacturer under a list price of US $5600. Why would the Fuji be any different? Fortunately for my dreaming and my wallet, it's far too short for my interests anyway.

Link | Posted on Sep 7, 2017 at 23:08 UTC
In reply to:

Rod McD: We've waited a long tome to see this lens. I'm very confident that it will have excellent optics and I'm glad to see that it has a limiter switch on the barrel alongside the OIS switch. It looks substantial but we don't know the weight - the full specs aren't out. I'm betting that it's heavier than the 90/2 (540g) and if people start using it with TCs or extension tubes, it may well be a very front heavy rig without it's own tripod collar. More so on the smaller Fuji bodies. We also don't know if its IF, and if so whether it allows decent working distances at higher magnifications. I look forward to hands on reports.

IF designs have some advantages but they aren't all good. An IF lens doesn't focus by extension, but the downside is that the focal length reduces as you increase magnification, which makes working distances shorter at high magnifications anyway.

Link | Posted on Sep 7, 2017 at 22:52 UTC
In reply to:

Rod McD: We've waited a long tome to see this lens. I'm very confident that it will have excellent optics and I'm glad to see that it has a limiter switch on the barrel alongside the OIS switch. It looks substantial but we don't know the weight - the full specs aren't out. I'm betting that it's heavier than the 90/2 (540g) and if people start using it with TCs or extension tubes, it may well be a very front heavy rig without it's own tripod collar. More so on the smaller Fuji bodies. We also don't know if its IF, and if so whether it allows decent working distances at higher magnifications. I look forward to hands on reports.

Thx. If that 750g is confirmed, the 80mm Macro is a VERY substantial lens for the Fuji system. It would have made a tripod collar all the more useful. Imagine mounting a 750g lens on a 150g TC = 900g total weight on a camera like the XE3 or XT20 that weigh under 400g. And then attach the whole rig to a tripod via the camera's base plate socket. Perhaps not a wise move....

Link | Posted on Sep 7, 2017 at 07:42 UTC

We've waited a long tome to see this lens. I'm very confident that it will have excellent optics and I'm glad to see that it has a limiter switch on the barrel alongside the OIS switch. It looks substantial but we don't know the weight - the full specs aren't out. I'm betting that it's heavier than the 90/2 (540g) and if people start using it with TCs or extension tubes, it may well be a very front heavy rig without it's own tripod collar. More so on the smaller Fuji bodies. We also don't know if its IF, and if so whether it allows decent working distances at higher magnifications. I look forward to hands on reports.

Link | Posted on Sep 7, 2017 at 07:05 UTC as 31st comment | 5 replies

I don't know how well this lens will sell because of the short FL and limited magnification. Ironically they discontinued the 90, 125 & 180mm Apo Lanthars a few years back, and now the demand for them is strong enough to send the prices sky-high, at least for the longer two. Hint to Cosina : All you need to do to create some good business is re-issue the 125mm and 180mm Apo Lanthars. Just do it - relaunch a fixed production run of the same lenses unchanged in any way. There is nothing currently available from anyone that exactly fills their niche.

Link | Posted on Aug 8, 2017 at 13:08 UTC as 40th comment | 2 replies

Macro lenses are trending bigger..... and at 625g this is another one. Manufacturers seem to be forgetting that many people use macro lenses in the field. One might have to carry them for many days in a rucksack and every ounce counts. Put it on an extension tube of say 30mm to get to 1:1, and it will be a very front heavy combo.

By comparison, my Fuji 60/2.4 macro also goes to 1:2 but weighs only 215g and takes a 39mm filter. Not apo, but excellent optics nevertheless. My Voigtlander 90/3.5 Apo Macro (vII) is also far smaller - it weighs 321g and takes a 39mm filter, but only goes to 1:3. Sure I understand the difference between f2 and f3.5, but f2 isn't important for macro. It's also a pity that CV ditched rubber focusing grips. I don't prefer slippery metal lenses. I'll think I'll pass.

Link | Posted on Jul 25, 2017 at 07:27 UTC as 29th comment
On article Domke F-803 and F-5XB review (73 comments in total)

Bags that offer low level protection, won't stand up and have little room for accessories....... Not for me.

Link | Posted on Jul 6, 2017 at 06:38 UTC as 15th comment
In reply to:

Rod McD: I've never understood bag manufacturer's thinking when it comes to tough cases. The first problem with photographer back packs is that the manufacturers don't seem to 'get' how much additional but essential non-photographic gear you also need to carry in back country. The second problem is that they're on your back......

Then there's the hard cases..... The key problem with Pelican and similar brief-case-styled side-hinged hard cases is that you have to put them down to open them. Like backpacks, they're good for transport, but neither are any good to access and work out of when they're hanging off your shoulder and you need to open them to change lenses, add filters, hook up flashes, etc.

I'd like to see more choice in light weight, gasket-sealed, top-loading hard cases that can be opened while hanging on the straps off your shoulder. There are a just a few, like those from Underwater Kinetics but they all tend to be quite small boxes.

@ gtvone...... I use an Underwater Kinetics 609 Dry Box most of the time outdoors. It measures roughly 9LX6WX6D". It's a top opener. The strap attachments are on the ends on the centerline at the top, so it hangs on the shoulder like a small soft case and allows you to work from it with the lid open. It'll take a small DSLR or mirror-less and about three primes of moderate size, or a couple of zooms, and a few small accessories like batteries, etc. You can buy them empty or with pluck foam. I bought mine empty and put in my own dividers (with epoxy) and lined it with closed cell foam. For a pic see my post at https://www.dpreview.com/forums/post/53619768. (The problem with this is that it's inflexible if you buy different gear.) I actually bought a second one and fitted it to take my XT1, 16/1.4, 23/1.4 and 60/2.4 macro - my landscape and nature kit. It comes hiking, kayaking, sailing, etc. Fantastic, but limited to small kits. There's nothing else like it available

Link | Posted on Jun 30, 2017 at 14:04 UTC
In reply to:

Rod McD: I've never understood bag manufacturer's thinking when it comes to tough cases. The first problem with photographer back packs is that the manufacturers don't seem to 'get' how much additional but essential non-photographic gear you also need to carry in back country. The second problem is that they're on your back......

Then there's the hard cases..... The key problem with Pelican and similar brief-case-styled side-hinged hard cases is that you have to put them down to open them. Like backpacks, they're good for transport, but neither are any good to access and work out of when they're hanging off your shoulder and you need to open them to change lenses, add filters, hook up flashes, etc.

I'd like to see more choice in light weight, gasket-sealed, top-loading hard cases that can be opened while hanging on the straps off your shoulder. There are a just a few, like those from Underwater Kinetics but they all tend to be quite small boxes.

@pokesfan ...... The briefcase styled ones aren't indeed designed to be opened on the shoulder. Which is why they have to be put down to open them. Which is exactly why they're good for transport and no good for access during use. But think outside the box (pun intended). If they were made deeper, opened from the top, and the strap attachment points were relocated, they'd hang perfectly on the shoulder. Just like a hard and sealed version of a top loading soft case. You could open and close them without putting them down. Which is brilliant for hiking, boating, etc. Pelican do make a one or two top loaders but they're heavy. Underwater Kinetics make many cases and their Dry Boxes. The model 609 Dry Box is a top loader that works very well in that role but they're restricted by size to small kit. And it fits in a rucksack with all your camping gear if you don't want it around your neck (like when you're skiing).

Link | Posted on Jun 30, 2017 at 13:33 UTC

I've never understood bag manufacturer's thinking when it comes to tough cases. The first problem with photographer back packs is that the manufacturers don't seem to 'get' how much additional but essential non-photographic gear you also need to carry in back country. The second problem is that they're on your back......

Then there's the hard cases..... The key problem with Pelican and similar brief-case-styled side-hinged hard cases is that you have to put them down to open them. Like backpacks, they're good for transport, but neither are any good to access and work out of when they're hanging off your shoulder and you need to open them to change lenses, add filters, hook up flashes, etc.

I'd like to see more choice in light weight, gasket-sealed, top-loading hard cases that can be opened while hanging on the straps off your shoulder. There are a just a few, like those from Underwater Kinetics but they all tend to be quite small boxes.

Link | Posted on Jun 30, 2017 at 00:17 UTC as 4th comment | 7 replies

I believe that the Iberits are also available in other mirror-less mounts (ie as well as Leica).

Hey DPR, how about a lens test/article/samples on the Iberits? There are very, very few sites on the net where anyone has tried any of them and no lab tests at all. If people could actually access better information and confirm whether they deliver decent IQ, we might actually learn whether they're lenses worth a look. Thanks.

Link | Posted on Jun 28, 2017 at 22:54 UTC as 7th comment | 1 reply

Sorry, just plain lame.

Link | Posted on Jun 22, 2017 at 10:05 UTC as 16th comment

I have a TG4 for kayaking. I've no plans to upgrade to either the TG5 or the new Ricoh. For me the next real step up is when there's a tough camera with enthusiast features AND a bigger sensor. Yes the AW1 has one, but as an ILC, it comes with a maintenance schedule and a reputation for problems. If they'd offered it as a fixed-zoom-lens camera with a 24-70 or 24-85 I'd be down at the shop tomorrow.

Link | Posted on May 25, 2017 at 09:53 UTC as 13th comment

I have a TG4 and it seems to me that the sensor size is the real limitation. I also have a Canon G1X and UW housing but housings aren't the answer for many sports because they're simply too big to stuff into a PFD, jump suit, ski suit, etc. I would be happier if Olympus (or anyone else) made a tough cam with a bigger sensor. My Fujifilm HDM water resistant 35mm compact was small, light and full frame thirty years ago. Even a 1" sensor might start looking better and still be feasible to fit into a small rugged body.

And can we have real "o" rings please? The internet is littered with leak stories and warranty problems. The same old Fujifilm HDM had an AA battery compartment accessed through a circular door with an "o" ring in the base plate. Surely Oly could do the same thing with a shaped Lithium battery and an SD card?

Link | Posted on May 20, 2017 at 13:34 UTC as 12th comment | 3 replies

"How will we answer to the passionate customers of the LX100? We will study how we’re going to answer these customers." This clearly indicates that the replacement for the LX100 hasn't even been designed yet. And there I was waiting for it.......or even a future date. Oh well.

Link | Posted on May 10, 2017 at 09:24 UTC as 12th comment | 1 reply
On article In praise of shooting monochrome landscapes (335 comments in total)

I really love the mix of form and textures in No1. And No 2 is obviously a very spectacular outcrop and cliff. Anyone (OP?) know where these are please?

Link | Posted on Apr 30, 2017 at 12:05 UTC as 108th comment | 1 reply
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