Rod McD

Lives in Australia Australia
Joined on Jan 15, 2010

Comments

Total: 355, showing: 1 – 20
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In reply to:

Rod McD: Yawn. No new info. Ah well, I suppose it's probably achieving its purpose in that they're getting us interested to see the announcement when it actually gets here. We'll all be wiser in two week's time.....

Nothing on the lenses but rumors. If Nikon want to attract anyone who's not already invested in Nikon lenses, they'll have to have a balanced set of native lenses out very early - something like a 24/35/50/85 and a zoom trio. The very reason I didn't buy into Sony was that for about three years you couldn't buy a 24/25mm prime or a macro.

Sure, Nikon will design their adapters to work well with existing Nikon lenses in order to hold onto their current users, but my comment was specifically about potential buyers not already invested in Nikon reflex glass. If they aren't already in Nikon why would anyone leap at buying pre-existing reflex lenses plus adapters just to buy a Nikon without a mirror-box and the same lenses?

My guess is that those buyers will keep using whatever they're using until the native Nikon mirror-less lens range matures enough to offer them most of the lenses they regularly use. And no, they won't be cheap - I didn't suggest they would be. But if the cameras are good, the new lenses are first class, and people are confident that Nikon will develop the system (unlike the stagnation we saw in the Nikon 1 and Canon M systems) they'll sell.

Link | Posted on Aug 10, 2018 at 03:33 UTC

Yawn. No new info. Ah well, I suppose it's probably achieving its purpose in that they're getting us interested to see the announcement when it actually gets here. We'll all be wiser in two week's time.....

Nothing on the lenses but rumors. If Nikon want to attract anyone who's not already invested in Nikon lenses, they'll have to have a balanced set of native lenses out very early - something like a 24/35/50/85 and a zoom trio. The very reason I didn't buy into Sony was that for about three years you couldn't buy a 24/25mm prime or a macro.

Link | Posted on Aug 9, 2018 at 22:26 UTC as 145th comment | 4 replies
In reply to:

Rod McD: Laowa certainly seem to be staking a claim for producing good quality and innovative designs that the established brands won't risk. I like macro. Perhaps an expected low volume of sales makes it expensive, but I don't think I can justify and afford this lens for the use I would make of it.

Yup. Understood. I'm much the same. It'll be interesting to see lens tests to see how it compares to getting 2:1 via more conventional means. I hope it's excellent and that Laowa have success with it.

Link | Posted on Aug 3, 2018 at 02:25 UTC

Laowa certainly seem to be staking a claim for producing good quality and innovative designs that the established brands won't risk. I like macro. Perhaps an expected low volume of sales makes it expensive, but I don't think I can justify and afford this lens for the use I would make of it.

Link | Posted on Aug 2, 2018 at 23:03 UTC as 59th comment | 3 replies

Interesting..... The Nikon 1 system stagnated for lack of lenses. The Nikon DX system fared better, but stagnated once Nikon developed FF bodies. The take up of this new system will clearly depend for existing customers on the performance of the lenses they already own on adapters. And for those contemplating an all-mirror-less kit, it will depend on the lens range in the new mount. If Nikon don't launch with a decent suite of new lenses and a clear lens road map for planned lenses, new-to-Nikon buyers are going to be very cautious.

Link | Posted on Aug 2, 2018 at 14:18 UTC as 160th comment
On article Nissin MG10 hammerhead flash goes on sale (39 comments in total)

Why do flash manufacturers make it so difficult to establish what the GN is at some standard FL? If you take the link to Nissin's website it tells you its GN is 80. At what ISO? In what units? And at what FL? It zooms from 24-200mm. If it has a GN of 80 at 100ISO and 24mm, that is a powerful unit. If it's 80 at the long end of the zoom range, it will be significantly lower at 24mm...... It may be buried in the specs deep in the manual, but not all manufacturers even supply the data. We need an easily found standard to compare units with a standard ISO and FOV.

Link | Posted on Aug 1, 2018 at 09:13 UTC as 4th comment | 1 reply
On article Review: The Wandrd Prvke is a near-perfect camera bag (333 comments in total)

The main problem with backpack camera bags is that they're on your back. They can be good for transport, but they are not good to actually work from on the move. And secondly, if you're actually hiking, there's insufficient space for all the other usual stuff - raincoats, hats, food, gloves, water bottles, stoves, maps, torches, and so on. What do the designers think - we leave home with just a camera?

Many bags lack bump and crush resistance and in this case the walls and dividers IMO look thin. I'd also be suspicious of weather resistance with so many openings. Not for me. There was a time when you could buy heavily made soft cases with very solid build quality, heavy exterior and interior padding and rugged zips. Eg the original Lowe AW series. Not any more. Bag design and build quality seem to be a race to the bottom.

Link | Posted on Jul 30, 2018 at 22:19 UTC as 42nd comment | 2 replies

Great image. Reminds me of a couple of 'Excellent +++++' lenses I've occasionally got from e-Bay sellers. The insides looked liked they'd been used for mushroom farming. One of the sellers said he'd used it recently and his images were sharp......

Link | Posted on Jul 23, 2018 at 23:34 UTC as 40th comment | 1 reply
In reply to:

keepreal: Part 3 of 3

… improvements in sensors and RAW camera imaging software.

I agree with those here who say the results from a small frame size can be pretty good. No doubt with the more expensive and recent models than my E-PL3, the results probably are even better.

However, why bother with anything less than full frame when the size and weight are no worse or little worse with the bigger frame size? For me that has the added advantage of OVF which I would only give up for a top notch mirrorless provided…

Provided mirrorless is smaller and lighter without inherent drawbacks, it would be foolish to ignore them. However, any interest in any of them I had has been utterly lost when you look at the whole package.

With MFT and APS-C any extremely wide distortion free lens as wide as 18mm on full frame is big, heavy and expensive. So what is the point? This XF 8-16mm F2.8 on an XF camera body is heavier than my full frame with the 20mm f/1.8 or anything available in 16mm worth considering.

Firstly, you appear to assume that the key reason for using mirror-less is smaller size and weight. It's quite true for some people, but there are many possible reasons for choosing mirror-less over a DSLR and size isn't 'it' for everyone. And a mirror-less camera can be any size.
But, to the lens...... I'm sure your point about the 8-16/2.8 being heavier than an FF camera with a 20mm prime lens is factually correct. It would be true of a FF camera with (say) the Nikon 14-24 or Tamron 15-30mm zoom compared to the same 20mm prime. And it would also be true compared to any Fuji camera with a WA prime like the XF14mm (21mm FF equivalent FOV). However, the point of a zoom is FL flexibility covering a range of primes. I'm a Fuji user but like you, I won't be buying the 8-16/2.8 because it's too heavy for my tastes. Nevertheless, some people like them, and just like the Nikon and Tamron, Fuji's gamble is that it will sell. And that's why Fuji are making it. It's business.

Link | Posted on Jul 22, 2018 at 13:04 UTC
In reply to:

ogl: I think this "high-end" lens has huge distortion in RAW as usual for mirrorless lenses.

It's four months before the first one is due to be sold. Surely objectivity demands waiting to test the actual product? Some mirror-less lenses have excellent optical correction for distortion.

Link | Posted on Jul 21, 2018 at 13:59 UTC
In reply to:

Rod McD: Why not make the same lens available in Fuji X-mount? The registration distance is very close indeed. (Sony is 18.0mm, Fuji 17.7mm.) They could absorb 0.3 mm very easily in machining the Fuji bayonet.

There's plenty of interest in the Fuji market for non-native lenses including longer macro lenses. Both Sony and Fuji have excellent OEM macro lenses yet Cosina still gauge there's business in this lens. They might even do better - the Sony 90mm is cheaper than the Voigtlander, the Fuji 80mm is dearer than the Sony. Part of the economics would be the cost of offering the additional mount, but as I pointed out above, the incremental change in registration distance for X-mount would make that minimal.

Link | Posted on Jul 4, 2018 at 23:17 UTC

Why not make the same lens available in Fuji X-mount? The registration distance is very close indeed. (Sony is 18.0mm, Fuji 17.7mm.) They could absorb 0.3 mm very easily in machining the Fuji bayonet.

Link | Posted on Jul 4, 2018 at 14:24 UTC as 3rd comment | 3 replies

Yet another fast standard lens??? The market is drowning in standard lenses. There's one for every budget..... Handevision, Kamlan, Kaxinda, Meike, 7Artisans, Samyang / Rokinon, SLR Magic, Mitakon/Zhongyi, Voigtlander, Yongnuo and now Neewer. And that's without mentioning the camera companies' own lenses. I know choice is good, and good luck to them all, but do we really need more? If some of the new manufacturers would look to see where the gaps are in the X and E lens range, we might get some lenses that really complement the OEM line up. (Honorable exception to Laowa for their innovative designs.)

Link | Posted on Jun 17, 2018 at 13:23 UTC as 5th comment
In reply to:

technotic: Will it really work on an A7 IIII? Has anyone tested that?

Look again. You missed the fact that technotic was taking a humorous shot at the typo in the article - there is no A7IIII.

Link | Posted on Jun 13, 2018 at 00:03 UTC
In reply to:

Rod McD: Why has it taken so long for the Sony system to get a 24mm??? The lack of WA primes early in the life of the Sony A7 series was THE reason that I didn't buy in. Eventually the system did get WAs - but in the form of zooms - then the Sony 28mm, and the Zeiss Loxias and Batis if you could afford them. Only now, years later, here's a 24mm. It's small enough to be interesting to the wandering traveler and landscaper and with the bonus of being affordable for most photographers. If its performance is as good as its 35mm sibling, it should be a winner.

@ virtual reality - I'm not sure when they became available. They weren't around in E-mount at the time the first A7s came out, but I did certainly omit them from my list above. OTOH, both are massive lenses - not what I had in mind for mirror-less at all.

Link | Posted on Jun 12, 2018 at 01:13 UTC

Why has it taken so long for the Sony system to get a 24mm??? The lack of WA primes early in the life of the Sony A7 series was THE reason that I didn't buy in. Eventually the system did get WAs - but in the form of zooms - then the Sony 28mm, and the Zeiss Loxias and Batis if you could afford them. Only now, years later, here's a 24mm. It's small enough to be interesting to the wandering traveler and landscaper and with the bonus of being affordable for most photographers. If its performance is as good as its 35mm sibling, it should be a winner.

Link | Posted on Jun 11, 2018 at 23:58 UTC as 14th comment | 4 replies
On article First pictures of rumored Samyang 24mm F2.8 AF lens (114 comments in total)
In reply to:

VENTURE-STAR: I must be missing something here. What's the big deal? It's cheap and cheerful 24mm lens, that may or may not be optically any good, with a less than inspiring maximum aperture and a totally average filter thread. Who cares?

You rate lenses by maximum aperture and filter thread size???

Link | Posted on Jun 6, 2018 at 03:05 UTC
In reply to:

Rod McD: We seem to be getting more choice in lenses in WA, standard and short tele than ever before. That's a good thing and I wish Kamlan and others business success. OTOH, I'd love to see some of these emerging companies offering longer FLs that fill gaps either thinly covered or not covered at all by the mirror-less camera manufacturers. How about 180, 200, 300, 400, 500mm lenses in good ED glass? Moderate speeds would keep the price and weight down and be perfectly usable in these days of good high ISO. You might even escape mortgaging the house to buy one.

I agree with you about the WAs, not the teles. Most legacy long lenses don't hold up well. I've been through quite a few. A handful do..... In 300mm, there are several in ED/L glass, expensive apo options like the Apo Telyts, and one or two collectable options in Fluorite. In 500mm you've got the Nikon 500/4P, the FD 500/4.5L, and the Sigma Apo 500/4.5 and a few rarer lenses that are very hard to find. Good examples of any of them will cost you USD$1500+. None are new. And not all repairs are feasible - there are risks in buying them. Modern lens designs do hold advantages. Some good affordable new designs would be a good thing.

Link | Posted on Jun 2, 2018 at 01:57 UTC
In reply to:

Rod McD: We seem to be getting more choice in lenses in WA, standard and short tele than ever before. That's a good thing and I wish Kamlan and others business success. OTOH, I'd love to see some of these emerging companies offering longer FLs that fill gaps either thinly covered or not covered at all by the mirror-less camera manufacturers. How about 180, 200, 300, 400, 500mm lenses in good ED glass? Moderate speeds would keep the price and weight down and be perfectly usable in these days of good high ISO. You might even escape mortgaging the house to buy one.

How about one each way? Two instead of one? A 300/4 and 500/5.6? I'd pay well for good apo/ED/ULD lenses even if the apertures are unexotic. For those of us who can't afford thousands of dollars for the super-fast long AF lenses, there's nothing but adapted lens options and only the very best of those avoid the film era CA issues..... And if it's a 400/5.6, well that's fine too. But it wouldn't be $150 though.....

Link | Posted on Jun 1, 2018 at 08:06 UTC

We seem to be getting more choice in lenses in WA, standard and short tele than ever before. That's a good thing and I wish Kamlan and others business success. OTOH, I'd love to see some of these emerging companies offering longer FLs that fill gaps either thinly covered or not covered at all by the mirror-less camera manufacturers. How about 180, 200, 300, 400, 500mm lenses in good ED glass? Moderate speeds would keep the price and weight down and be perfectly usable in these days of good high ISO. You might even escape mortgaging the house to buy one.

Link | Posted on Jun 1, 2018 at 04:21 UTC as 13th comment | 4 replies
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