JensR

Lives in United Kingdom Bath, United Kingdom
Works as a Mechanical Engineer
Joined on Nov 23, 2003
About me:

Hi,

thanks for stopping by!
If you want to see what I'm up to, send me a message :)

My 'plan':
Talk Pentax into a digital Electro-Spotmatic! (This needs some work...)

-------------

Older Signatures:

'LBA knows no bounds, and seeks no justification...' (Jim King, 2005)
http://www.jr-worldwi.de/photo/index.html - Photography, Tech and Geek stuff :}

'Why is everyone answering rhetorical questions?' (Me, 2005)

'Well, 'Zooming with your feet' is usually a stupid thing as zoom rings are designed for hands.' (Me, 2006)

'I only trust those photos I have faked myself.' (Me, 2007)
http://www.jensroesner.de/

--=! Condemning proprietary batteries since 1976 !=--

'I don't want them to believe me, I just want them to think.'
Marshall McLuhan

Comments

Total: 247, showing: 61 – 80
« First‹ Previous23456Next ›Last »
On article Teardown: Sony a7R III weather sealing examination (42 comments in total)
In reply to:

Oleg Ivanovskiy: Looks like very weak protection to me. Canon or Nikon do not promote their flagships as "weatherproof", Sony does. With an "*" mark that it's "not 100% guaranteed". To me, if it's "not 100% guaranteed", you better keep your mouth shut about it.

The term they use is not "weatherproof", but they claim a certain ruggedness against the elements anyway:

From your link of the A9:

Reliable dust- and moisture-resistant design
Enjoy carefree shooting in tough environments, with comprehensive dust- and moisture-resistance measures that help guard against moisture and dust. Protection includes sealing around buttons, dials, media jack cover, and enclosure edges featuring tongue-and-groove joints for double shielding to tightly interlock panels and components.

And for the A7R III again using your own link!
Highly durable and operable in tough conditions
The α7R III functions reliably in challenging environments. Its body is fortified by lightweight, high-rigidity magnesium alloy top cover, front cover, internal frame, and rear cover. The number of lens mount screws has been increased to six for enhanced durability. Major buttons and dials are sealed. Sealing is provided throughout the body to minimize entry of dust and moisture.

Link | Posted on Dec 18, 2017 at 21:49 UTC
In reply to:

sludge21017: So when the helium leaks out - these drives are done for.

Helium is smaller than hydrogen. This is true for a single atom, but in addition, hydrogen generally only exists as a molecule, so it contains two hydrogen atoms.

Link | Posted on Dec 16, 2017 at 00:20 UTC
In reply to:

rb67: Helium sealing with internal moving parts, how about heat build-up it could explode.

Helium is an inert noble gas - it doesn't react and certainly doesn't explode. Are you by any chance thinking of hydrogen?

Link | Posted on Dec 15, 2017 at 23:40 UTC
In reply to:

retr01976: It's quite strange, but it seems that the technology behind crop sensors has improved beyond that of full frame to the point where the differences between crop and ff are now only a matter of DOF. If FF was improving in parallel, we should technically see FF sensors leaps and bounds ahead of crop. I know my Fuji easily bests my Canon FF cameras in just about every measure sans detail at the very highest of ISOs.

Per silicon area, the sensors are basically the same, but 24x36 will always be twice the area of APSC. Unless there is technology that only works on smaller sensors, 24x36 will always be a stop better.

Link | Posted on Dec 15, 2017 at 22:03 UTC
In reply to:

sop51: Most of this exhibitionist risk-taking wouldn't exist were it not so easy to record and post these things. The insane activities one sees on Youtube these days, posted by idiots whose only motivation is getting views from strangers, wouldn't have crossed anyone's mind back when the technology wasn't so readily available.

Essentially the same technology that helps to solve crime and do reporting.

Link | Posted on Dec 15, 2017 at 02:13 UTC
In reply to:

biggles266: To be perfectly honest, when I read this headline, I felt nothing. No feeling of tragedy, no surprise, just ... nothing. I'm not proud of that, but it's just a fact. There are so many people in the world suffering despite not choosing to constantly take such silly risks like this, risks which disrespect the gift of life and health. So if someone dies when doing these stunts it seems completely unimportant compared to the people who deserve compassion because their circumstances are tragic even though they aren't contributing to it through their repeated foolishness.

I'm not making a hero out of anyone. What a lousy attempt at strawmanning.

FWIW, I agree that a reminder is proportionate. But disagree about what I would class as a reminder: A broken leg or arm, not plunging to one's death.

I think the callous responses here reveal a far greater risk to humanity than the alledged YOLO mentality.

Link | Posted on Dec 15, 2017 at 02:11 UTC
In reply to:

biggles266: To be perfectly honest, when I read this headline, I felt nothing. No feeling of tragedy, no surprise, just ... nothing. I'm not proud of that, but it's just a fact. There are so many people in the world suffering despite not choosing to constantly take such silly risks like this, risks which disrespect the gift of life and health. So if someone dies when doing these stunts it seems completely unimportant compared to the people who deserve compassion because their circumstances are tragic even though they aren't contributing to it through their repeated foolishness.

At the same time, the punishment should be proportionate to the wrongdoing. Hanging over an abyss and realising that your life will end with being young and foolish strikes me as disproportionate. "Other people have it worse" is not a helpful sentiment - should we only cry for the one person on this planet who truly has it "the worst"?

Link | Posted on Dec 15, 2017 at 01:52 UTC
On article A fully loaded iMac Pro will cost you $13,200 (572 comments in total)
In reply to:

Daniel Clune: Imacs are over priced. There just using standard PC parts now. You pay through the nose for the OS. I build my own Pc's and can do that for 1/3 the price imac charges. If you really believe the Apple OS is worth that then have at it. Oh this super priced one is way over kill. Zeon processor are made for severs not for photo of video editing. You will never use that much ram either.

> Some people like their good wine cheap, some people like their good wine expensive and with precise rules what they can do with it.

Fixed that for you ;)

Link | Posted on Dec 15, 2017 at 00:28 UTC
On article A fully loaded iMac Pro will cost you $13,200 (572 comments in total)
In reply to:

Bjrn SWE: We recently ordered Dell Precision workstations at my job for Revit and Autocad work and it was €&£$% expensive and not very fast, and t takes a looong time to start (no flash/ hybrid disks). And I have to say that Windows is (still) as bad as it's reputation. iMacs are way cheaper and definitely faster and I would never, ever use anything but Macs if it was my own decisions.
(Have an iMac 27" and a MacBook Pro 13")

They are not "artificially spec-ed in such a way that they are essentially unusable" that's just rubbish. They are specced to a price point for offices that do simple admin work with Word+Outlook+Excel+Edge. Of course these machines won't cut it for graphic designers or CAD use.

Link | Posted on Dec 15, 2017 at 00:23 UTC
In reply to:

Roland Karlsson: Actually cool. If it works. The only way to get sharper pinhole images for a small sensor (e.g. 35 mm FF) is to go wide angle. And - for the mirrorless camera there is no flapping mirror to hit that inverted cone.

So - it is all about if they really can make an 120 degree pinhole. That is not easy. It has to be extremely thin and even at the edges of the hole.

I am kind of tempted by this.

If it does not already exist. There are already precision pinholes to buy. But ... probably not at that angle.

Depends what you want to do, really.
scanner could be promising, but not being able to adjust the exposure easily is probably the bigger problem in a camera without aperture control.

Link | Posted on Dec 15, 2017 at 00:18 UTC
In reply to:

Roland Karlsson: Actually cool. If it works. The only way to get sharper pinhole images for a small sensor (e.g. 35 mm FF) is to go wide angle. And - for the mirrorless camera there is no flapping mirror to hit that inverted cone.

So - it is all about if they really can make an 120 degree pinhole. That is not easy. It has to be extremely thin and even at the edges of the hole.

I am kind of tempted by this.

If it does not already exist. There are already precision pinholes to buy. But ... probably not at that angle.

I was thinking of getting inspiration from those mechanical designs and then use a scanning back (just for the oddity, it would be cool, but you'd need to severely modify the scanner to get the required exposure times) or a screen and a secondary digital camera:
https://www.dpreview.com/forums/thread/3996328

http://www.instructables.com/id/Digital-Pinhole-Camera-on-the-cheap-Hack/
Looked promising, but lack of proofs is a downer.

Link | Posted on Dec 14, 2017 at 16:12 UTC
In reply to:

Roland Karlsson: Actually cool. If it works. The only way to get sharper pinhole images for a small sensor (e.g. 35 mm FF) is to go wide angle. And - for the mirrorless camera there is no flapping mirror to hit that inverted cone.

So - it is all about if they really can make an 120 degree pinhole. That is not easy. It has to be extremely thin and even at the edges of the hole.

I am kind of tempted by this.

If it does not already exist. There are already precision pinholes to buy. But ... probably not at that angle.

Well, I think people spend more money on worse toys than pinhole lenses ;)

I agree that a camera obscura with photo paper is special, though :)

Roland, several projects (kickstarter, DIY blogs, youtube...) exist for large format pinholery. Some with CAD data you can 3D print. You might have a extra few ideas up your sleeve, but even you might be able to go further if you use the existing projects?

Link | Posted on Dec 13, 2017 at 16:34 UTC
In reply to:

Roland Karlsson: Actually cool. If it works. The only way to get sharper pinhole images for a small sensor (e.g. 35 mm FF) is to go wide angle. And - for the mirrorless camera there is no flapping mirror to hit that inverted cone.

So - it is all about if they really can make an 120 degree pinhole. That is not easy. It has to be extremely thin and even at the edges of the hole.

I am kind of tempted by this.

If it does not already exist. There are already precision pinholes to buy. But ... probably not at that angle.

@falconeyes Yes, "sharp" pinhole photography basically needs large format :-/

Link | Posted on Dec 11, 2017 at 15:29 UTC
In reply to:

Ole Moller: Will the 11mm lens with a 120 degree FOV on MFT. be 22mm on my Olympus Pen F?

The focal length of a pinhole is its distance from the imager plane.
So the 11mm version it will be 11mm on MFT - it will not give 120° on MFT!
(It will give the same angle of view as a 22mm lens would give on full frame.)

Link | Posted on Dec 11, 2017 at 15:17 UTC
In reply to:

ChatBot: The idea of a "sharp" pinhole lens seems like an oxymoron. Pinhole lens are blurry by nature. Will a more precise hole make a noticeable difference?

Having compared a bargain pinhole and a medium-high quality pinhole on my Sony Nex, I can tell you from first hand experience that yes, it makes a difference. And while no one does pinhole photography for utmost sharpness, there is a difference between a blurry mess and a softening blur. Large format pinhole looks even better, but that's not what this thread is about.

Link | Posted on Dec 11, 2017 at 15:10 UTC
In reply to:

AstroStan: A lot of common sense in that interview.

"The obsession with shallow depth of field and bokeh is another thing that will probably go at some point."

2nd that! <g>

It will go. And return. And be bigger. And smaller.
While the term "bokeh" is relatively recently fashionable, as Sezano says, the need or want for shallow DoF has been around for decades, from film making to LF portraits. Sometimes it was a niche, sometimes a requirement and sometimes the whole point.
But I do notice that younger(?) people don't like "those fuzzy areas, why is it not sharp?" so I can see how she might be right.
But eventually, the pendulum will swing back and we'll get electronically enhanced super shallow DOF in 2030ish.

Link | Posted on Dec 7, 2017 at 19:13 UTC
In reply to:

Sezano: what's the consensus on the one camera to have out of all of these?

While I agree with rpm40 (I am a huge supporter of AA batteries), if you stick with a popular model and CF/SD/MS you should have enough supply of third-party batteries and cards for many years to come. Might make it easier to find a camera that ticks the other boxes of your requirements.

Link | Posted on Dec 7, 2017 at 19:08 UTC

The weather sealing must be ruined by using that adapter. I am glad everything survived, but not sure it is the ideal combo for snowstorms.

Link | Posted on Dec 7, 2017 at 19:00 UTC as 10th comment | 1 reply
In reply to:

Polacofede: Another option could be getting a k3ii, k1 and use astrotracer to get insane amounts of exposure time thanks to astrotracer. Imho worth the time to at least give it a try.

When I said "the style of photography shown here" I indeed was referring to single-shot photos.

> "faffing about with the seam"

You have the seam between the two photos, star background with tracker, foreground without and then you need to apply a mask and so on. Depending on the seam, it can be a lot of effort to get right. (to faff is informal British English for "spend time in ineffectual activity")

Link | Posted on Dec 6, 2017 at 14:35 UTC
In reply to:

Polacofede: Another option could be getting a k3ii, k1 and use astrotracer to get insane amounts of exposure time thanks to astrotracer. Imho worth the time to at least give it a try.

@Polacofede He is doing single-shot photos, no merging. So I repeat: "unsuitable for the style of photography shown here."
Now, on the question whether merging is a good way of doing this, I will just say that faffing about with the seam is exactly the reason why I personally won't be "using a tracker" although my K-1 has it.

Link | Posted on Dec 6, 2017 at 13:30 UTC
Total: 247, showing: 61 – 80
« First‹ Previous23456Next ›Last »