Steve Swayne

Steve Swayne

Lives in Australia Adelaide, Australia
Works as a Semi-Retired Photographer and Mixed Media Artist
Joined on Feb 3, 2007
About me:

I have enjoyed photography since I was a child. I have taken countless photos over the years. I have scanned all my 35mm slides and negatives to create a fully online digital library. My photos hosted on Flickr have been seen over 13,000,000 times.

Comments

Total: 131, showing: 1 – 20
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I have many thousands of images taken with a Lumix DMC-LC5 4MP camera in 2002. Will be interesting to see the results with these JPG images.

Link | Posted on Sep 21, 2021 at 21:05 UTC as 13th comment | 1 reply
In reply to:

MDV2k18: Wow tough crowd! The photography community must be one of the most conservative of the creative arts!

Whether it's a new thing or that he invented it or not, I think it's cool and very well done. I'd love to try that technique and curious to know how it does it. Is it going to revolutionize photography? Certainly not, but just like 3D images, animated photos, 2D parallax, cinemagraphs etc. these are just extra eye candy one can play with. Don't get so defensive everyone!

Raist3d, your tone in your response is rude and prickly, precisely what the original poster was on about...

Link | Posted on Sep 17, 2021 at 21:10 UTC

I used a Lumix DMC-LC5 4MP which came out in 2002. I really liked the camera optics and the photos it took. Limited capacity SD cards and low resolution were the major constraints back in the day. But I still managed to take nearly 16,000 travel pics in Europe in three months in 2002. A task that would have been prohibitively expensive with film, albeit with far greater potential resolution through scanning.

Link | Posted on Aug 31, 2021 at 00:03 UTC as 3rd comment
In reply to:

MDV2k18: Wow tough crowd! The photography community must be one of the most conservative of the creative arts!

Whether it's a new thing or that he invented it or not, I think it's cool and very well done. I'd love to try that technique and curious to know how it does it. Is it going to revolutionize photography? Certainly not, but just like 3D images, animated photos, 2D parallax, cinemagraphs etc. these are just extra eye candy one can play with. Don't get so defensive everyone!

The photography community using this website, yes for sure.

Link | Posted on Aug 30, 2021 at 23:31 UTC

I am surprised that the screen size was an issue you listed as did not like. Do they not sell a 27-inch screen version for those seeking the larger screen? The smaller screen is for those who have limited budget or desk space or who are happy with the smaller size, surely.

Link | Posted on Aug 30, 2021 at 21:24 UTC as 5th comment | 1 reply
In reply to:

Michael J Emerson: What's wrong with having patina in an old photo? That's what gives it a character. Software like this is only of interest to pixel peepers and the like. Garbage.

I think you have commented on the wrong article. This is all about animating video from a still photo, in other words bring people back to life, not just enhancing a photo by removing blemishes...

Link | Posted on Mar 26, 2021 at 06:22 UTC
In reply to:

brownie314: I wish Fuji would make a wide angle version of this. The fixed-lens market seems to be devoid of all cameras that go wider than 24mm equiv.

Years ago I owned a Lumix LC5 which had a 3x zoom lens going from quite wide to around human eye FOV. A Leica designed lens, it was very good, albeit in an early 4MP retro styled camera.

Link | Posted on Dec 30, 2020 at 03:34 UTC

Back in 2014 I purchased a second hand Spiratone Bello-Dupliscope for use with my Canon 5D Mk II body which I used to re-photograph a heap of 35mm slides in cardboard frames. The results came out pretty good. Not everyone has access to a full frame camera body however.
http://www.max.grenkowitz.net/?topic=1114

Here are some of the results from 35mm slides taken in 1980.
https://www.flickr.com/photos/maleny_steve/albums/72157649613887275

Link | Posted on Dec 6, 2020 at 23:35 UTC as 2nd comment

Way back in 2002 I bought a Panasonic Lumix DMC-LC5 which was one of the first fixed lens digital cameras to adopt a retro appearance. At that time it was around the same price as the X100V is now. I really enjoyed that camera and took it all over the world. 17,000 shots over 3 months in Europe in 2002. The limitation of 4MP and pretty woeful low light performance was a product of the level of technology of the time. I am now considering moving back to a more simple camera arrangement - just an X100V - and re-selling all the other gear I have been lugging around...

Link | Posted on Dec 6, 2020 at 23:21 UTC as 12th comment
In reply to:

Kiwisnap: "the dot-dot-dot thing"

or ellipsis as we call it in English.

To be honest, this year has not been all that bad for us at all, aside from not being able to leave New Zealand it's been pretty reasonable, fortunately.

Same in Australia. The major impact for me in Adelaide has been disruption to the possibility of unfettered overseas travel... Which is the scheme of things is trivial. We have been very fortunate down under to have better government responses to Covid-19 and the geographical isolation and lower populations of people more willing to accept restrictions for the common good.

Link | Posted on Dec 6, 2020 at 23:14 UTC
In reply to:

Verto: I've struggled with this camera mainly because of the Lack of IS. It's 2020 and not having IS for low light shooting is a major flaw. Everyone tells me the safe bet on the x100v is 1/60 to ensure sharp images. On the GRIII I can go down to 1/8 in low light. The GR III destroys the X100v for low light shooting. Barney, how slow can you shoot your camera and get sharp results 100% of the time?

A lot depends on how steady you are when shooting. I often do long exposure hand held shots where a steady hand is more important than the camera tech.

Link | Posted on Dec 6, 2020 at 23:07 UTC
On article Zeiss ZX1 real-world samples gallery (237 comments in total)
In reply to:

Don Sata: Images look quite soft.

Agree with HowaboutRAW. You cannot properly judge from images in a web browser, you need to download RAW and process them yourself to accurately assess.

Link | Posted on Dec 5, 2020 at 22:32 UTC

For those who dabble in any ray racing app, you can easily achieve the same effect with a crystal sphere and backdrop image :)

Link | Posted on Dec 4, 2020 at 23:03 UTC as 2nd comment

Such a shame there is no quick and easy way to slip in a digital full frame sensor into these old cameras.

Link | Posted on Nov 5, 2020 at 23:12 UTC as 2nd comment

My own informal experimentation on Flickr is interesting. I occasionally process an image both in high fidelity colour as the eye saw it, but also reprocess and share the same image in black and white or sepia. Often the B&W or sepia version gets considerably more attention. But these images are developed in Lightroom in a way that makes them quite dramatic.

Link | Posted on Oct 29, 2020 at 21:20 UTC as 7th comment
In reply to:

madeinlisboa: Thank you but I'm a photographer, not a cheater.

Ansel Adams retort in 3,2,1.....

entoman - kind of agree with you if it a location near home, but back in 2009, I spent 4 months travelling through remote central Australia. For 3 of those months, yes a full 12 weeks, there was not a single cloud in the sky. Every single image I took has a totally empty sky. This sort of tech gives me an opportunity to tinker with a select number of images to improve, well in my estimation, improve the image from what was taken. I am a big sky and cloud buff and have taken hundreds of images of interesting skies, so I can even keep to my own work and often use skies taken with the same camera and lens as the images I am considering enhancing. 90% of my shots over the past 50 years have little or no detectable postwork. But 10% do have... :)

Link | Posted on Oct 22, 2020 at 02:20 UTC
In reply to:

madeinlisboa: Thank you but I'm a photographer, not a cheater.

Ansel Adams retort in 3,2,1.....

So, you have never been on a holiday when the one time you were at that special location and the sky was not behaving... Sure you don't want to do it on every shot, but it will have its uses.

Link | Posted on Oct 20, 2020 at 21:47 UTC
On article Sony a7C review: Compact size, big sensor image quality (2218 comments in total)
In reply to:

Glen K Wells: Considering the market the camera is aimed at it would have benefitted from a built in pop up fill flash which a lot of new users and indeed others would have found useful. Without it the target audience may stay with the a6XXX series.

I have had all sorts of cameras from FF to iPhones to bridge cameras. I have owned flash units and cameras with built in flash. I have found over the past 10 years the occasions where I would use a flash are less and less. Such good low light performance in modern sensors.

Link | Posted on Oct 16, 2020 at 03:22 UTC

I had a look, the search facilities are difficult unless you know exactly what you are looking for. Otherwise way too many to wade through to find something of random interest, and although I clicked to see the site in English, every image I accessed defaulted back to French, so I had to click English again each time. They need to create some better intuitive way to browse the imagery, the same goes for most online collections really.

Link | Posted on Feb 9, 2020 at 21:51 UTC as 3rd comment

You did not mention dust inside the camera body and on the sensor... A massive issue for some newbie users who change lenses in less than ideal conditions...

Link | Posted on Jan 20, 2020 at 05:00 UTC as 25th comment
Total: 131, showing: 1 – 20
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