migus

Lives in Switzerland Zurich, Switzerland
Works as a research
Joined on Nov 11, 2009

Comments

Total: 241, showing: 1 – 20
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On article Adobe achieves record revenue (174 comments in total)

LR being the de-facto standard, every now and then after a new release I give it a trial.

And each time it hits me as a sluggish app, ponderously taking its time for every step - while gulping tons of DRAM, CPU and disk space.

Adobe and AutoDesk, to name just two related s/w behemoths, enjoy a de-facto monopolistic status inherited from decades ago - the kinda "moated castle" Warren Buffet loves to invest in ... Both play cat&mouse games w/ their file formats to prevent competition. None is particularly innovative or nimble re. their core products and features.

Captive markets and taking your loyal customers as hostages does work handsomely sometimes - until the competition catches up.

Link | Posted on Jun 24, 2017 at 11:28 UTC as 2nd comment | 1 reply
In reply to:

scoobysnapstories: they still making macs? whoa.

"they still making macs?"... without 10-bit/channel support?

Does the new MacOS fully support 10b color end-to-end?
The h/w has 10b since years, ditto for Windows. However, for some stubborn kernel/driver reasons the MacOS has ironically refused to cooperate w/ the 10b displays. Now the ascent of HDR is likely imposing full support for 10b.

Link | Posted on Jun 6, 2017 at 16:14 UTC
In reply to:

Faris Marino: 23 1.8 please

Sharp: has no substitute, neither optical, nor electronic. Once a lens is built, if it's fuzzy, decentered or plagued by a dozen optical faults - it can NOT be fixed.

Fast: Became the new cry - suddendly we all seem to be shooting only black cats in old coal mines... :-)
In the age of big / low noise sensors and image engines, 1M ISO, VR/OIS/IBIS/OSS etc., one can argue that we do have an arsenal of means for compensating a slower lens.
Yet the fast lenses are inherently BIG, heavy and expensive (all that heavy glass must be polished and then hauled around someone's neck).

Cheap: We understand the squeeze from phones, market saturation etc. However, recently a few aspiring companies like Sony/Zeiss (also Fuji) have snuk their lens prices up into the PREMIUM segment. To the point that one can't buy a decent E-mount APS zoom under 1K$... :-(

Link | Posted on Jun 2, 2017 at 06:50 UTC
In reply to:

Faris Marino: 23 1.8 please

i take
1. Cheap.
2. Sharp

Link | Posted on Jun 1, 2017 at 16:14 UTC

Seeing the title and the 'just' 8Mp camera my heart raced ahead: This must be a new hi-end low-noise new sensor, attached to a portable photo album... yay, I need 2 of these for my parents!

Then i realized it's the TBT column... :-)

Link | Posted on Jun 1, 2017 at 16:08 UTC as 10th comment | 1 reply

"The company says the move to higher value products allowed Digital Imaging's operating income to maintain essentially flat, despite declining sales."

higher value products = higher margin terminology, e.g., Full-Frame (aka Premium branding)

Works great for a few sub-niche FF markets, yet these are also hotly competed and arguably saturated in the multi-K$ segment. The sub-1K$ FF system (MSRP) is years away, and the APS-C glass was left behind by Sony ca. 3 yrs. ago.

Sony rides on its sensors and specs, relevant to its sub-niches. I love the EF mount, and yet the lack of APS glass investment makes me doubt Sony's future - based entirely on FE "value product" and OEM sensors.

Link | Posted on May 28, 2017 at 12:23 UTC as 18th comment | 2 replies

Lovely mental exercise, and practical too: Build compact hi-IQ walkaround systems, ideally w/ pancakes!
(Corollary: A new market for premium pancake designs?)

The amount of comments shows that it struck some nerve.

Link | Posted on May 21, 2017 at 10:57 UTC as 21st comment

"Where the TG-4 used a 16MP BSI CMOS sensor, the TG-5 has dropped to 12MP, in order to improve image quality (according to the company)."

Kudos for the courage. Next, please consider larger sensors for such non-perishable cameras!

i'm still using an old Powershot A620, the last of the series w/ a 1/1.7 sensor.

Link | Posted on May 17, 2017 at 15:42 UTC as 42nd comment
In reply to:

CatchAlive: I am honest: if this kind of article is the future of DPreview, I will sign out.

What's next? "You want a Leica but you don't enough money? Let's see the cheapest way to emulate a Leica" or "You can't afford the new Zeiss Otus? Here is a listing of lens way cheaper that will do the job"

It reminds me when I began guitar in the 90s reading articles like "5 ways to get Satrini's sound... cheaper"

Excellent article, stimulating mental exercise... practical as well.
If that's the future of DPR, please sign me in :-)

Link | Posted on May 16, 2017 at 09:37 UTC
On article The Sony a9 is a 24MP sports-shooting powerhouse (1905 comments in total)
In reply to:

ThomasH_always: Please disregard this, its a sarcastic entry:

I am sure that the introductory price will fall... A bit. Like the EOD-5D, which I called from Day One a $1300 camera for $3000. Guess what , we can get 5D Mk III for $1700. So I will be willing to make Sony a favor and use their device as soon as the price will be a bit lower, say $1400-$1800, because of the lousy set of lenses, not a match to Canon or Nikon. And no optical viewfinder.

Well, folks, that's me, that's the way I purchase this stuff. So far it always worked out for me, but I do not shoot for money, and I am not in a hurry. The older I get, the less "stuff" I have, the lenses are smaller, my eyes see less fine details. Patience and a "virtual release date" of every piece of equipment shifted by a year works wonders on the prices...

"I still do not see this reflected in the price. Lets look at the finest precision, durability and complexity of the mirror and AF systems, and ask yourself how much effort it is to assembly it, test it, and yet, the product costs... less or even drastically less. Something is off."

Canikon had 50+ yrs to amortise this mechanical complexity across many millions of cameras.

Sony barely started, first by taking the lead in sensors, then by miniaturizing the body and electronics (e.g., I still wonder at my old Nex 5N), next by adding features we didn't even know we wanted (perhaps Steve Jobs wasn't all wrong).. etc.

Prices reflect a competitive market in flux, assaulted by phones and changes in consumers' behaviors wrt. photo. I also wish the FF Alphas would cost sub-1K$ MSRP.. :-)

Link | Posted on Apr 26, 2017 at 15:40 UTC
On article The Sony a9 is a 24MP sports-shooting powerhouse (1905 comments in total)
In reply to:

ThomasH_always: Please disregard this, its a sarcastic entry:

I am sure that the introductory price will fall... A bit. Like the EOD-5D, which I called from Day One a $1300 camera for $3000. Guess what , we can get 5D Mk III for $1700. So I will be willing to make Sony a favor and use their device as soon as the price will be a bit lower, say $1400-$1800, because of the lousy set of lenses, not a match to Canon or Nikon. And no optical viewfinder.

Well, folks, that's me, that's the way I purchase this stuff. So far it always worked out for me, but I do not shoot for money, and I am not in a hurry. The older I get, the less "stuff" I have, the lenses are smaller, my eyes see less fine details. Patience and a "virtual release date" of every piece of equipment shifted by a year works wonders on the prices...

Used Ferrari's go relatively cheap in Switzerland; each model has its threshold of "time to sell - else service gets $$"...
After which they become accessible to those who know how to give them a worthy 2nd life.

Ditto for cameras: I've bought most of mine 2nd hand or greatly discounted, years after introduction. All of them were exceeding my skills, and still do.

Do i lust after some "missing" features? Yes, i do - but again, cameras were not my bottleneck. Glass sometimes is, though...

Link | Posted on Apr 20, 2017 at 12:09 UTC
In reply to:

falconeyes: Guetzli is named according to the #GoogleSwissMade series.
It is from the Lab Google Research Europe, located in Zürich, Switzerland and employs 2000 people, the largest Google lab outside the US. It is planned to be grown to 5000 people.

Just a little background info for the kind readers wondering about the name which is Schwizerdütsch actually.

P.S.
Albeit smaller (350 people), the more famous US research lab in Zürich is IBM set up in 1956. It produced one Nobel price.

P.S.2
I'd really liked DPR staff to provide that kind of complementary info. It is easy enough to find ...

"Albeit smaller (350 people), the more famous US research lab in Zürich is IBM set up in 1956. It produced one Nobel price." => actually 2

"The Zurich lab is world-renowned for its scientific achievements—most notably Nobel Prizes in physics in 1986 and 1987 for the invention of the scanning tunneling microscope[1] and the discovery of high-temperature superconductivity,[2] respectively. Other key inventions include trellis modulation, which revolutionized data transmission over telephone lines..."
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/IBM_Zurich_Research_Laboratory

Link | Posted on Mar 21, 2017 at 20:17 UTC
On article New Canon EOS 77D sits between Rebel T7i and EOS 80D (52 comments in total)

@DPR: Why not just issue an aggregated single post for such 'stellar' triads of incremental cameras from Canon - arguably sharing lacks.
Of compelling new features, of attractive pricing, of 4k video in AD2017.

Thus we could all unitedly bash them at our hearts desires :-)

Half-empty jokes aside, Canon seems to continue distracting its engineers with questionable targets.

Link | Posted on Feb 16, 2017 at 07:26 UTC as 4th comment
On article Stunning time-lapse captures the seasons of Norway (65 comments in total)
In reply to:

mezastel: This is an awesome set of timelapse compilations! I do wonder though, why has the author restricted it to a letterbox format instead of sticking to good old-fashioned 16:9. Is it because it provides more opportunities for cropping? Also I visited Norway a few years back and yes, it does look this beautiful.

Amazing beauty - and the work behind it!

Yet I deplore the wide apect ratio --too common nowadays and often artistically detrimental-- that has not rendered full justice to this impressive work. I wondered how much better would've been in a 15:10 or 16:9... ?

Neither the scenes (beautiful!), nor the human visual system benefit from crops much wider than, e.g., 13..18:10. Reason for the HDTV compromise on 16:9.

How about a 16:9 version?

Link | Posted on Feb 5, 2017 at 05:36 UTC
On article F is for '4th': Hands-on with Fujifilm X100F (424 comments in total)
In reply to:

Jostian: not even basic weather resistance :( got caught in a rain storm with my X100T and it got water in, and never fully recovered :) so I say now what I said then, would love a new X100xxx but must have some weather sealing... guess I'll wait and hope for another year or 2.

some sealing would be expected at its price points

Link | Posted on Jan 23, 2017 at 19:43 UTC
On article Dell's 8K monitor goes on sale in March for $5000 (217 comments in total)
In reply to:

faterikcartman: Too often companies seem to make what they think they can hype to the market. While ignoring what users really want. I suppose there are users who will plant their noses a foot from this 32" monitor. But I rather not hurt my neck. Further away are you really going to see 8k resolution? Were I The Monitor King, I would be making a 4 or 5k --tops -- in this size, OLED, and brag about blacks, contrast, and uniform brightness. But I guess 8k is easier to grasp and market. Reminds me of megapixels.

"a 4 or 5k --tops -- in this size, OLED, and brag about blacks, contrast, and uniform brightness"
Agreed: 4K/32" and 8K/40" are ideal in DPI at 2-3 feet distance.

My take: Despite having a 4k/40" (VA monitor) + another 4k/50" (TV), my most used is an ancient 2.5k/30" IPS screen, owing to its 114% AdobeRGB. Milky blacks, low contrast, low res... yet solid colors, ok uniformity and reasonable DPI.

So... I'm waiting for 30-40" true HDR OLEDs, 4-8K...
Yet the GPUs, HDCP, DP and HDMI standard implementations are still lagging, particularly in laptops... see Intel's kaby lake at CES, or Apple's 'support' for 10-bit

Link | Posted on Jan 6, 2017 at 18:37 UTC
In reply to:

migus: tantalizingly beautiful!

and yet, no hires pics, nor exposure data, anything to teach the rest of us... :-(

1) I respect any artist's IP (intellectual property is also part of my daily bread), not to mention the artistic results - beautiful!

2) Also I fully understand posting low-res only, even if others and i (amateurs with other income sources) may post full res. The final 'product' shouldn't always be a free download... potentially leading to starvation and then regression.

3) However, about the (lack of) EXIF and metadata i beg to differ.
I believe in the free access to education, unhindered circulation of knowledge, and the open publication thereof. This is arguably part of the 'give' side...

Rationale: The tools used by the artist to create these great images were possible only thru the intellectual effort of thousands of scientists and engineers across decades - and their publications, incrementally building upon each others' discoveries. Published and freely accessible to any young mind, wherever on Earth, however poor.

Life's an ever shifting balance between give and take...

Link | Posted on Jan 2, 2017 at 20:41 UTC
In reply to:

migus: tantalizingly beautiful!

and yet, no hires pics, nor exposure data, anything to teach the rest of us... :-(

i'd rather avoid re-inventing the wheel each and every time... incrementally experiment ABOVE the known state of the art

Standing on the shoulders of giants means IMHO that one could stabilize a drone (or rocket) w/o having to first re-invent control, calculus, algebra etc.
Sometimes it seems that the creative artists may have a more protective / proprietary mentality than the scientists and engineers (that actually provide the tools / means for bespoke creativity :-)

Link | Posted on Jan 1, 2017 at 14:36 UTC

tantalizingly beautiful!

and yet, no hires pics, nor exposure data, anything to teach the rest of us... :-(

Link | Posted on Jan 1, 2017 at 12:34 UTC as 45th comment | 8 replies
On article Woof! Sony a6500 sample images are here (365 comments in total)
In reply to:

eno2: I really don't like the Sony processing engine, colors are bad, NR is strong and sharpening is high leading to high artifacts at higher ISO values. Once again, the Sony JPG engine is one of the worst out there. :(

Those who care so much about IQ as to avoid JPG and take the pain of RAW 'development' may benefit from investing a few $ more for a 10bit screen, e.g., an oldie 2.5K that can be bought cheaply today:

"Of course, the ZR30w delivers in color gamut. Note that in the volumetric 3D plot, the wireframe plot is the ZR30w, and the solid plot is AdobeRGB 1998 - that’s right, we’ve exceeded the AdobeRGB color space. The raw data is impressive, the display manages 111.36% of coverage, the highest we’ve tested. In this case, we’ve exceed the manufacturer claims of 99% AdobeRGB by a notable margin. I have no trouble believing that HP's claims about 1+ billion colors are totally accurate - you have to see it in person to believe it. There are just some colors I'm used to not seeing represented very well; reds and blues especially, and the photos that I have looked at are spectacular."
http://www.anandtech.com/show/3754/a-new-30-contender-hp-zr30w-review/4

Link | Posted on Nov 21, 2016 at 05:16 UTC
Total: 241, showing: 1 – 20
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