migus

Lives in Switzerland Zurich, Switzerland
Works as a research
Joined on Nov 11, 2009

Comments

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At least 4 factors concur to make the OP right in her oracular prediction:

1) The "good enough" factor, aka Pareto principle, aka KISS.
Is today's phone good enough as an entry-level dSLR/ILC replacement? Not yet. But it's getting there fast and unstoppably.

2) The best camera is the one you always have w/ you.
Guess which one is that? Right, a phone.

3) Versatility: Why do we always have a phone w/ us?
I need it for podcasts, mp3 and rarely for GPS. Others for tweets, snapchats, whatsapps, vibers, skype, email...
Others for WWW, or games... and some even for voice/phone.
A camera remains a single purpose tool, neither cheap, nor small, nor re-targetable (except when used as a weapon or door-stopper :-)

4) History repeats itself.
At every step the nay-sayers (including often myself) have underestimated the tech progress.
Next "camera... optical phased-array receiver, or OPA, collects the light from which it forms its image using a grid of devices called grating couplers."

Link | Posted on Aug 14, 2017 at 14:12 UTC as 295th comment | 1 reply
In reply to:

Ebrahim Saadawi: Do entry-level DSLR buyers only settle for a camera that has a tiny chip and a 28mm prime fixed with computational background fuzzying? If so, yes the phone will "kill" the Entry-level SLR.

iMHO: DSLR buyers around the world (ESPECIALLY) want the actual camera ergonomics and education on photographic art, they want to use zoom lenses, prime lenses, upgrade path to professional work (as a possibility most buyers put in mind).

With a 500$ SLR from Canon imagine just how much it can do compared to a phone and how much the phone mimics the compact cameras and you'll realize it's not happening anytime soon. Unless some huge technological achievement to small sensors arrive that make them as sharp, colourful, wide dr, lovely skin, natural blur, immensive zoom, 10x lowlight noise, UWA shooting, maybe a grip!

The article is all wrong in my opinion watching people and camera sales figures around the world. Compacts yes. Entry-level ILCs, no. Only 1 out of a 100 would settle for a phone.

At least 4 factors concur to make the OP right in his oracular prediction. see separated post.

Link | Posted on Aug 14, 2017 at 14:10 UTC
On article Throwback Thursday: Adobe Lightroom 1.0 (124 comments in total)

LR being the standard, every new release I give it a spin - to check its general operation and speed. Despite my rather fast and carefully tuned PCs, and small RAWs (14-16MPix) from Nex and NX, the newest LR invariably crawls :-(

So... instead of wasting even more hours sitting (very bad for your health!) in front of my gorgeous 31-40" screens, this old IT fart will rather tune the OOC JPG engines of his cameras the best he can, and then, spend those extra hours shooting outdoor. Less bloatware-ladden PCs, more photography... even if sometimes PPS could really help a shot.

Small edits, crops and image mgnt (few 100k shots) are nimbly doable w/ Picasa, whose ancient version 3 feels like a cheetah vs. the LR elephant.

Link | Posted on Aug 4, 2017 at 03:59 UTC as 15th comment | 1 reply
In reply to:

Richard Schumer: Bah! This "news" is by and for the legal departments; expect big patent battles or cross-brand patent exchanges in future. Curved sensors are great in theory.

The problem is that, in theory, theory and practice should be the same. In practice, they are not.

Curved sensors make good sense for the (industrial, automotive, robotics, military) apps using single/fixed lens. However, the CMOS technology remains planar (all the 300mm foundries) - the "curved" silicon pricing is open

In 7-10 yrs we may expect the lens-less optical phased-array (OPA) cameras to replace some of the current sensor/lens designs https://www.economist.com/news/science-and-technology/21724796-future-photography-flat-cameras-are-about-get-lot-smaller

Link | Posted on Jul 22, 2017 at 12:39 UTC
In reply to:

upptick: I work as a patent attorney but have never investigated Nikon's patent portfolio -- until now. I just did a quick a dirty search for "Nikon" as the patent owner (or "assignee, in patent lingo), with the keyword "sensor" in the patent specification (which is the technical description of the technology being patented). I got more than 3200 hits, meaning Nikon has the rights to that many patents and patent applications related to sensor technology. In comparison, Sony has more than 10,000....

Curved sensors make good sense for the apps using single/fixed lens. However, the CMOS technology remains planar (all the 300mm foundries) - so pricing is a problem.

Dark horse changing the picture: In 7-10 yrs we may expect the lens-less optical phased-array (OPA) cameras to replace some of the current sensor/lens designs https://www.economist.com/news/science-and-technology/21724796-future-photography-flat-cameras-are-about-get-lot-smaller

Will the curved sensor+fixed lens grow fast enough, or is it just preemptive IP strikes at competition?

Link | Posted on Jul 22, 2017 at 12:35 UTC
In reply to:

bobbarber: I vote Linux on PC, Linux on Mac, Mac, and PC in that order. Obviously if I needed Photoshop instead of Gimp, ImageMagick, digiKam, etc. the order would change.

I vote Linux on servers, HPC/sim clusters and Cloud.
I vote win10 (with native Linux shell, no VM) on laptops, for performance, battery and apps - w/o perpetual sysadm fidgeting.
I vote Mac for my elderly family and technophobes.

However, plenty of my colleagues use MBP's today at work to get the benefits of Linux (tools, consoles) and Windows (battery life, freedom of sysadm jobs). Yet many of them wouldn't buy home a Mac... too limited and $$.

Link | Posted on Jul 18, 2017 at 04:40 UTC
In reply to:

retr01976: Microsoft is slowly dying giant. The real issue with Microsoft is they have no eco system. Their mobile business is dead,. They don't have an app store that can compete with Google and Apple. They don't have a solid cloud solution as well rounded as Google Drive or iCloud. What Microsoft continues to hold onto is legacy of desktop applications such as its office suite, but the traditional desktop is a slowly dying animal
something that Apple and Google recognize. Windows 10 is a great example of a poorly designed operating system from its confusing inconsistent interface to its weak security model. Owning a windows machine is like putting all of your personal files in a box in front of your house and hoping no one decides to take a peak. I have been a security researcher and director of information security for a billion dollar company for the better of 20 years. If you want to buy into a solid well rounded, reliable, stable, secure eco system, choose Apple. If you mainly need web based applications and are looking for a more affordable solution look at Google's Chrome offerings.

"Microsoft is slowly dying giant."

As a MS competitor, i wish you were right about MS, its products and strategies...
Unfortunately most of your statements are factually invalidated by the reality of MS today being part of the "Big 5": Amazon, Apple, FB, G, MS...

Granted, their mobile phone/Lumia has indeed crashed, badly. Yet everything else at MS is ramping up robustly (including their massive R&D) - much to my dismay.
BTW: their Win10 is now so good in performance and battery (After i disabled ca. 2 dozen spyware services that also the other Big 4 have..!) that i gave up on Linux and Macs for my personal machines.
One can even run native Ubuntu Linux today under win10 https://www.howtogeek.com/249966/how-to-install-and-use-the-linux-bash-shell-on-windows-10/

Link | Posted on Jul 18, 2017 at 04:27 UTC
In reply to:

Wally Brooks: How about 10-bit color depth, which requires the hardware, OS, monitor, and graphics card are all 10 bit compatible. None of which the Mac supports....

I use Macs at work-CEO mandate- and I use a PC for my photo editing too.

10b on Mac practically started as of 2016 - decades later than on PC. Ironically for the artsy roots of Apple/Mac, this quite belated OS upgrade was not to better serve the artistic / photog communities - neglected till Dec'15, but primarily due to the UHD HDR screens and TVs.

Link | Posted on Jul 18, 2017 at 03:58 UTC
In reply to:

keeponkeepingon: So canon's 10-18 equals 16mm on a full frame sensor (due to a 1.6 crop) while nikons 10-20 with a 1.5 crop will give you 15mm full frame equivalent.

Question: Is that 1mm at that focal length a big deal?

Thanks!

"So canon's 10-18 equals 16mm on a full frame sensor (due to a 1.6 crop) while nikons 10-20 with a 1.5 crop will give you 15mm full frame equivalent."

yes it is, for the 360 panoramas... in some instances the 1.5 vs. 1.6x factor may translate in 30% less shots for a 360 (vs. a Canon 1.6x).
Hence most 360 pros actually avoid the Canon 1.6 cameras.

Link | Posted on Jul 4, 2017 at 15:22 UTC
On article Adobe achieves record revenue (176 comments in total)

LR being the de-facto standard, every now and then after a new release I give it a trial.

And each time it hits me as a sluggish app, ponderously taking its time for every step - while gulping tons of DRAM, CPU and disk space.

Adobe and AutoDesk, to name just two related s/w behemoths, enjoy a de-facto monopolistic status inherited from decades ago - the kinda "moated castle" Warren Buffet loves to invest in ... Both play cat&mouse games w/ their file formats to prevent competition. None is particularly innovative or nimble re. their core products and features.

Captive markets and taking your loyal customers as hostages does work handsomely sometimes - until the competition catches up.

Link | Posted on Jun 24, 2017 at 11:28 UTC as 3rd comment | 1 reply
In reply to:

scoobysnapstories: they still making macs? whoa.

"they still making macs?"... without 10-bit/channel support?

Does the new MacOS fully support 10b color end-to-end?
The h/w has 10b since years, ditto for Windows. However, for some stubborn kernel/driver reasons the MacOS has ironically refused to cooperate w/ the 10b displays. Now the ascent of HDR is likely imposing full support for 10b.

Link | Posted on Jun 6, 2017 at 16:14 UTC
In reply to:

Faris Marino: 23 1.8 please

Sharp: has no substitute, neither optical, nor electronic. Once a lens is built, if it's fuzzy, decentered or plagued by a dozen optical faults - it can NOT be fixed.

Fast: Became the new cry - suddendly we all seem to be shooting only black cats in old coal mines... :-)
In the age of big / low noise sensors and image engines, 1M ISO, VR/OIS/IBIS/OSS etc., one can argue that we do have an arsenal of means for compensating a slower lens.
Yet the fast lenses are inherently BIG, heavy and expensive (all that heavy glass must be polished and then hauled around someone's neck).

Cheap: We understand the squeeze from phones, market saturation etc. However, recently a few aspiring companies like Sony/Zeiss (also Fuji) have snuk their lens prices up into the PREMIUM segment. To the point that one can't buy a decent E-mount APS zoom under 1K$... :-(

Link | Posted on Jun 2, 2017 at 06:50 UTC
In reply to:

Faris Marino: 23 1.8 please

i take
1. Cheap.
2. Sharp

Link | Posted on Jun 1, 2017 at 16:14 UTC

Seeing the title and the 'just' 8Mp camera my heart raced ahead: This must be a new hi-end low-noise new sensor, attached to a portable photo album... yay, I need 2 of these for my parents!

Then i realized it's the TBT column... :-)

Link | Posted on Jun 1, 2017 at 16:08 UTC as 10th comment | 1 reply

"The company says the move to higher value products allowed Digital Imaging's operating income to maintain essentially flat, despite declining sales."

higher value products = higher margin terminology, e.g., Full-Frame (aka Premium branding)

Works great for a few sub-niche FF markets, yet these are also hotly competed and arguably saturated in the multi-K$ segment. The sub-1K$ FF system (MSRP) is years away, and the APS-C glass was left behind by Sony ca. 3 yrs. ago.

Sony rides on its sensors and specs, relevant to its sub-niches. I love the EF mount, and yet the lack of APS glass investment makes me doubt Sony's future - based entirely on FE "value product" and OEM sensors.

Link | Posted on May 28, 2017 at 12:23 UTC as 18th comment | 2 replies

Lovely mental exercise, and practical too: Build compact hi-IQ walkaround systems, ideally w/ pancakes!
(Corollary: A new market for premium pancake designs?)

The amount of comments shows that it struck some nerve.

Link | Posted on May 21, 2017 at 10:57 UTC as 21st comment

"Where the TG-4 used a 16MP BSI CMOS sensor, the TG-5 has dropped to 12MP, in order to improve image quality (according to the company)."

Kudos for the courage. Next, please consider larger sensors for such non-perishable cameras!

i'm still using an old Powershot A620, the last of the series w/ a 1/1.7 sensor.

Link | Posted on May 17, 2017 at 15:42 UTC as 43rd comment
In reply to:

CatchAlive: I am honest: if this kind of article is the future of DPreview, I will sign out.

What's next? "You want a Leica but you don't enough money? Let's see the cheapest way to emulate a Leica" or "You can't afford the new Zeiss Otus? Here is a listing of lens way cheaper that will do the job"

It reminds me when I began guitar in the 90s reading articles like "5 ways to get Satrini's sound... cheaper"

Excellent article, stimulating mental exercise... practical as well.
If that's the future of DPR, please sign me in :-)

Link | Posted on May 16, 2017 at 09:37 UTC
On article The Sony a9 is a 24MP sports-shooting powerhouse (1908 comments in total)
In reply to:

ThomasH_always: Please disregard this, its a sarcastic entry:

I am sure that the introductory price will fall... A bit. Like the EOD-5D, which I called from Day One a $1300 camera for $3000. Guess what , we can get 5D Mk III for $1700. So I will be willing to make Sony a favor and use their device as soon as the price will be a bit lower, say $1400-$1800, because of the lousy set of lenses, not a match to Canon or Nikon. And no optical viewfinder.

Well, folks, that's me, that's the way I purchase this stuff. So far it always worked out for me, but I do not shoot for money, and I am not in a hurry. The older I get, the less "stuff" I have, the lenses are smaller, my eyes see less fine details. Patience and a "virtual release date" of every piece of equipment shifted by a year works wonders on the prices...

"I still do not see this reflected in the price. Lets look at the finest precision, durability and complexity of the mirror and AF systems, and ask yourself how much effort it is to assembly it, test it, and yet, the product costs... less or even drastically less. Something is off."

Canikon had 50+ yrs to amortise this mechanical complexity across many millions of cameras.

Sony barely started, first by taking the lead in sensors, then by miniaturizing the body and electronics (e.g., I still wonder at my old Nex 5N), next by adding features we didn't even know we wanted (perhaps Steve Jobs wasn't all wrong).. etc.

Prices reflect a competitive market in flux, assaulted by phones and changes in consumers' behaviors wrt. photo. I also wish the FF Alphas would cost sub-1K$ MSRP.. :-)

Link | Posted on Apr 26, 2017 at 15:40 UTC
On article The Sony a9 is a 24MP sports-shooting powerhouse (1908 comments in total)
In reply to:

ThomasH_always: Please disregard this, its a sarcastic entry:

I am sure that the introductory price will fall... A bit. Like the EOD-5D, which I called from Day One a $1300 camera for $3000. Guess what , we can get 5D Mk III for $1700. So I will be willing to make Sony a favor and use their device as soon as the price will be a bit lower, say $1400-$1800, because of the lousy set of lenses, not a match to Canon or Nikon. And no optical viewfinder.

Well, folks, that's me, that's the way I purchase this stuff. So far it always worked out for me, but I do not shoot for money, and I am not in a hurry. The older I get, the less "stuff" I have, the lenses are smaller, my eyes see less fine details. Patience and a "virtual release date" of every piece of equipment shifted by a year works wonders on the prices...

Used Ferrari's go relatively cheap in Switzerland; each model has its threshold of "time to sell - else service gets $$"...
After which they become accessible to those who know how to give them a worthy 2nd life.

Ditto for cameras: I've bought most of mine 2nd hand or greatly discounted, years after introduction. All of them were exceeding my skills, and still do.

Do i lust after some "missing" features? Yes, i do - but again, cameras were not my bottleneck. Glass sometimes is, though...

Link | Posted on Apr 20, 2017 at 12:09 UTC
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