migus

Lives in Switzerland Zurich, Switzerland
Works as a research
Joined on Nov 11, 2009

Comments

Total: 261, showing: 1 – 20
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hopefully their software is better than its name... :-)
(suggesting a gimmicky app for Macs, or a McD. cheap serving... no undue offense to the honest folks named so since generations - my apologies to them!)

Link | Posted on Oct 21, 2017 at 10:22 UTC as 7th comment
On article RIP Lightroom 6: Death by subscription model (1543 comments in total)
In reply to:

jimjulian: Everyone please make an informed, personal choice, but have the facts: You post-processing is completely INTACT, but you can't edit further. You catalog will be perpetually available. Your Raw files are yours, and they are married to an XMP sidecar files, which contains your edits.

http://blogs.adobe.com/lightroomjournal/2014/07/what-happens-to-lightroom-after-my-membership-ends.html

"With Lightroom 5.5, at the end of a membership, the desktop application will continue to launch and provide access to the photographs managed within Lightroom as well as the Slideshow, Web, Book or Print creations that we know many photographers painstakingly create. The Develop and Map modules have been disabled in order to signal the end of the membership and the need to renew in order to receive Adobe’s continuous innovation in those areas. Access to Lightroom mobile workflows will also cease to function. We hope this meets the expectations of our customers and we look forward to an ongoing dialog."

"Q. Will Lightroom become a subscription only offering after Lightroom 5?
A. Future versions of Lightroom will be made available via traditional perpetual licenses indefinitely."
http://blogs.adobe.com/lightroomjournal/2013/05/lightroom-and-the-creative-cloud.html

Continuing the untruth line, what prevents Adobe from AI-scanning all my local content, label and use it w/o my approval? It's nearly as easy on a PC today as in a cloud...

A simple deal w/ FB or Google (or Yandex in Russia) would allow LR to label nearly every person, pet, location, time, action etc. -full content recognition and classification. Certainly a LR/PS-capable PC has the GPU, CPU and memory to do fairly deep learning, even in stealth mode. And deeper than just basic face recognition... trivial today even on phones.

How do we know what AI is done on our images, and how is the resulting data used by such corporations (not only the "Frightening Five") ...?

Link | Posted on Oct 19, 2017 at 18:40 UTC
On article Hello Lightroom CC: Embracing the future (479 comments in total)
In reply to:

Wes: "The new reality of photography [is one] where users tend to take a lot of their photos on their phones - and take a lot more images in general. [Many of them want] a powerful tool that allows them to communicate but doesn’t require them to spend a lot of time to learn."

In other words.... "We've completely forgotten who uses our products, but there are a LOT of really dumb (and wealthy) Instagramers out there with willing subscription money, so we are catering to them instead of actual photographers who are tired of paying subscription fees."

The 'cloud' model forces the enthusiasts, private and small time LR users (95% of the Adobe market?) to subsidise the big multisite corporate users (whose s/w is deductible anyway), and particularly Adobe - whose profits increased since 'cloudly' (w/o corresponding speed and function increases in LR till now).

On the German Autobahn cars drive freely (well, the germans do pay their taxes; but tourists and those in transit don't pay). OTOH trucks over 7 tons pay a fee - since indeed they stress the infrastructure disproportionately more than a car. Probably a poor analogy, given the many other countries w/ other arguably opposing models...

yet Adobe's cloudly model seem particularly predatory for LR's market, more than for PS.

Link | Posted on Oct 19, 2017 at 04:09 UTC
On article RIP Lightroom 6: Death by subscription model (1543 comments in total)
In reply to:

Paul JM: One of the most nicely written pieces on DPR ever, and I agree with every word. I have held off looking at Capture one and other alternatives, as i am now so heavily invested in LR, but I think now may be the time to jump. More than anything I am interested in the stability and longevity of my archive. I have more than 300,000 images stored in one major LR database, including scanned film files etc, all keyword coded and face recognition'd. The idea of no longer 'owning' the software the runs this database, and the 1000's of hours invested over many years in creating this archive is horrifying.

The LR $10/mo. deal is 1000-fold worse than eg., Netflix: Effectively, it's the ratio of GB/day of 'useful updates' received by a LR vs. Netflix user.

Netflix provides me w/ many 'updates' per day, ie., the all new series and movies that a user can watch => GB/day of useful 'updates' from Netflix.

Nothing comparable from LR for my camera and my images, even per year: the same $10/mo. LR 'deal' provides virtually 0 useful updates per mo., even per year (considering how slow LR 6 remains nearly a decade later!)... 100x - 1000x worse-off in GB/yr.

Granted, the Netflix user doesn't own either the 'seen' content (for offline re-runs)... However, those movies were not generated/edited and produced by the said user - as the case w/ our LR image database.

hence the analogy between video/music streaming services and LR CC ends before it starts...

However, the deal breaker is in loosing access to my image database (my property managed now by Adobe) whenever i terminate the subscription.

Link | Posted on Oct 19, 2017 at 02:19 UTC
On article RIP Lightroom 6: Death by subscription model (1543 comments in total)
In reply to:

mckracken88: "most households readily spend $10 per month for online streaming services, and many times that for mobile phone and data services."

Not this household - ever. Greedy so and so's. The subscription is just a money grab, only pros would benefit from that, the average joe doesnt need dozens of insignifanct updates on a daily basis.

Shame.. lightroom was good.

"$10 a month for streaming service that is used on a daily basis is a good deal"

Indeed: that $10/mo. Netflix provides its users with many 'updates' per day, ie., the all new series and movies that a compulsive binge watcher can watch.

granted, the Netflix user doesn't own either the 'seen' content (for offline re-runs)... However, those movies were not generated/edited and produced by the said user - as the case w/ our LR image database.

hence the analogy between video/music streaming services and LR CC ends before it starts

Link | Posted on Oct 19, 2017 at 01:58 UTC

I just calculated that one of my average shooting days would take ca. 3 weeks to upload into Adobe's "cloud"... And this using a relatively fast 10Mbps uplink, which often can be 5-10x slower in US... :-(

I'd need a year+ just to upload a 3-week vacation/session, using modern VDSL uplinks!

Great thinking, Adobe, in the age of 50Mpix cameras and 70MB RAW files...!

Link | Posted on Oct 18, 2017 at 14:43 UTC as 278th comment | 3 replies
In reply to:

Thomas Woob: Adobe is clearly out of their mind. They take vendor lock in to a whole new level. Bye bye Lightroom, finally enough motivation to switch away to something else that might even make better use of my hardware.

Upload my RAW's into Adobe's "cloud", wait and also pay for it...?
Hmm... lemme think: Together w/ my wife, also an enthusiast, we shoot up to 2-3K shots on a good day.
Current 40-50Mpix cameras have 14bit RAWs of ca. 70MB, up to 100MB (D850).
Hence a ca. 2-3TB of daily upload into Adobe's Cloud.
The typical upload speeds in US are a (very) few Mbps, sometimes/often under 1Mbps => let's take a lucky VDSL uplink of 10Mbps (5-7x faster than the average).

So... my min. 2TB of RAWs --ie., ca. 20Tb ~ 20,000,000 Mb-- must be uploaded first via a 10 Mbps "fast" link
=> Upload time: 2,000,000 seconds ~ 555 hrs. ~ 23 days upload for 1 day of shooting.

Could be 10x slower for many US uplinks, and future hires cameras may have 2-5x larger RAWs in a few years.

What's wrong with such business model...? :-)

Link | Posted on Oct 18, 2017 at 14:36 UTC
In reply to:

Franz Weber: Many of you who dismiss this camera have not compared the size and weight specs. This APSC camera is just as tiny as the G5X with 1 inch sensor.
And it is 150 g lighter than its predecessor which had a smaller sensor and lacked a viewfinder

An old a5100 with 16-50kit is smaller and lighter, has a Sony sensor (compare to Canon!), PDAF, raw hi-bitstream 1920 video, touchscreen and can be hacked freely for unlimited video recording. All these since ca. 3 yrs, for 1/2 the price or less today.

Link | Posted on Oct 16, 2017 at 12:35 UTC
In reply to:

DualSystemGuy: Looks like the best all-in-one if size and price are non-issues. Now that they have added PDAF you can actually use the zoom lens for sports and wildlife. A great option.

"if size and price are non-issues" : Well, both happen to be key issues for the vast majority.

I won't argue the 1.1Kg for such a zoom in relative terms (compared w/ an APS or even MFT equivalent), yet in absolute terms this ain't something to casually haul around for travel.

Link | Posted on Sep 12, 2017 at 18:27 UTC

Reluctantly Canon's MILC is slowly advancing: 300gr., 24Mp, DP-AF, a wider kit, likely settling at $449... One could critique a few obvious self-cripplings typical of Canon and entry-level positioning, and yet the bright message from Canon seems to be "We care about mirrorless!"

However, I don't see any compelling reason to switch from my 'ancient' Nex cameras that I bought during Obama's 1st term.

Link | Posted on Aug 29, 2017 at 04:37 UTC as 176th comment | 1 reply
In reply to:

sharkcookie: Yeah and you get every dust particle at 46 mp resolution. Scanning film or slides is not as easy as this little adapter. Nikon actually made some excellent scanners that have an infrared light and detector that looks for dust and automatically removes it. Works brilliantly. Without that feature, you get a lot of dust on it, no matter how much time you spend cleaning the negative or slide beforehand.

Dust and its IR-based auto-removal (ICE, or the Vuescan method) are a big deal for film scanning; unless you have a clean humid room, dust bunnies will always be ES-attracted your just-cleaned film :-)

Link | Posted on Aug 25, 2017 at 03:16 UTC

At least 4 factors concur to make the OP right in her oracular prediction:

1) The "good enough" factor, aka Pareto principle, aka KISS.
Is today's phone good enough as an entry-level dSLR/ILC replacement? Not yet. But it's getting there fast and unstoppably.

2) The best camera is the one you always have w/ you.
Guess which one is that? Right, a phone.

3) Versatility: Why do we always have a phone w/ us?
I need it for podcasts, mp3 and rarely for GPS. Others for tweets, snapchats, whatsapps, vibers, skype, email...
Others for WWW, or games... and some even for voice/phone.
A camera remains a single purpose tool, neither cheap, nor small, nor re-targetable (except when used as a weapon or door-stopper :-)

4) History repeats itself.
At every step the nay-sayers (including often myself) have underestimated the tech progress.
Next "camera... optical phased-array receiver, or OPA, collects the light from which it forms its image using a grid of devices called grating couplers."

Link | Posted on Aug 14, 2017 at 14:12 UTC as 302nd comment | 1 reply
In reply to:

Ebrahim Saadawi: Do entry-level DSLR buyers only settle for a camera that has a tiny chip and a 28mm prime fixed with computational background fuzzying? If so, yes the phone will "kill" the Entry-level SLR.

iMHO: DSLR buyers around the world (ESPECIALLY) want the actual camera ergonomics and education on photographic art, they want to use zoom lenses, prime lenses, upgrade path to professional work (as a possibility most buyers put in mind).

With a 500$ SLR from Canon imagine just how much it can do compared to a phone and how much the phone mimics the compact cameras and you'll realize it's not happening anytime soon. Unless some huge technological achievement to small sensors arrive that make them as sharp, colourful, wide dr, lovely skin, natural blur, immensive zoom, 10x lowlight noise, UWA shooting, maybe a grip!

The article is all wrong in my opinion watching people and camera sales figures around the world. Compacts yes. Entry-level ILCs, no. Only 1 out of a 100 would settle for a phone.

At least 4 factors concur to make the OP right in his oracular prediction. see separated post.

Link | Posted on Aug 14, 2017 at 14:10 UTC
On article Throwback Thursday: Adobe Lightroom 1.0 (124 comments in total)

LR being the standard, every new release I give it a spin - to check its general operation and speed. Despite my rather fast and carefully tuned PCs, and small RAWs (14-16MPix) from Nex and NX, the newest LR invariably crawls :-(

So... instead of wasting even more hours sitting (very bad for your health!) in front of my gorgeous 31-40" screens, this old IT fart will rather tune the OOC JPG engines of his cameras the best he can, and then, spend those extra hours shooting outdoor. Less bloatware-ladden PCs, more photography... even if sometimes PPS could really help a shot.

Small edits, crops and image mgnt (few 100k shots) are nimbly doable w/ Picasa, whose ancient version 3 feels like a cheetah vs. the LR elephant.

Link | Posted on Aug 4, 2017 at 03:59 UTC as 15th comment | 1 reply
In reply to:

Richard Schumer: Bah! This "news" is by and for the legal departments; expect big patent battles or cross-brand patent exchanges in future. Curved sensors are great in theory.

The problem is that, in theory, theory and practice should be the same. In practice, they are not.

Curved sensors make good sense for the (industrial, automotive, robotics, military) apps using single/fixed lens. However, the CMOS technology remains planar (all the 300mm foundries) - the "curved" silicon pricing is open

In 7-10 yrs we may expect the lens-less optical phased-array (OPA) cameras to replace some of the current sensor/lens designs https://www.economist.com/news/science-and-technology/21724796-future-photography-flat-cameras-are-about-get-lot-smaller

Link | Posted on Jul 22, 2017 at 12:39 UTC
In reply to:

upptick: I work as a patent attorney but have never investigated Nikon's patent portfolio -- until now. I just did a quick a dirty search for "Nikon" as the patent owner (or "assignee, in patent lingo), with the keyword "sensor" in the patent specification (which is the technical description of the technology being patented). I got more than 3200 hits, meaning Nikon has the rights to that many patents and patent applications related to sensor technology. In comparison, Sony has more than 10,000....

Curved sensors make good sense for the apps using single/fixed lens. However, the CMOS technology remains planar (all the 300mm foundries) - so pricing is a problem.

Dark horse changing the picture: In 7-10 yrs we may expect the lens-less optical phased-array (OPA) cameras to replace some of the current sensor/lens designs https://www.economist.com/news/science-and-technology/21724796-future-photography-flat-cameras-are-about-get-lot-smaller

Will the curved sensor+fixed lens grow fast enough, or is it just preemptive IP strikes at competition?

Link | Posted on Jul 22, 2017 at 12:35 UTC
In reply to:

bobbarber: I vote Linux on PC, Linux on Mac, Mac, and PC in that order. Obviously if I needed Photoshop instead of Gimp, ImageMagick, digiKam, etc. the order would change.

I vote Linux on servers, HPC/sim clusters and Cloud.
I vote win10 (with native Linux shell, no VM) on laptops, for performance, battery and apps - w/o perpetual sysadm fidgeting.
I vote Mac for my elderly family and technophobes.

However, plenty of my colleagues use MBP's today at work to get the benefits of Linux (tools, consoles) and Windows (battery life, freedom of sysadm jobs). Yet many of them wouldn't buy home a Mac... too limited and $$.

Link | Posted on Jul 18, 2017 at 04:40 UTC
In reply to:

retr01976: Microsoft is slowly dying giant. The real issue with Microsoft is they have no eco system. Their mobile business is dead,. They don't have an app store that can compete with Google and Apple. They don't have a solid cloud solution as well rounded as Google Drive or iCloud. What Microsoft continues to hold onto is legacy of desktop applications such as its office suite, but the traditional desktop is a slowly dying animal
something that Apple and Google recognize. Windows 10 is a great example of a poorly designed operating system from its confusing inconsistent interface to its weak security model. Owning a windows machine is like putting all of your personal files in a box in front of your house and hoping no one decides to take a peak. I have been a security researcher and director of information security for a billion dollar company for the better of 20 years. If you want to buy into a solid well rounded, reliable, stable, secure eco system, choose Apple. If you mainly need web based applications and are looking for a more affordable solution look at Google's Chrome offerings.

"Microsoft is slowly dying giant."

As a MS competitor, i wish you were right about MS, its products and strategies...
Unfortunately most of your statements are factually invalidated by the reality of MS today being part of the "Big 5": Amazon, Apple, FB, G, MS...

Granted, their mobile phone/Lumia has indeed crashed, badly. Yet everything else at MS is ramping up robustly (including their massive R&D) - much to my dismay.
BTW: their Win10 is now so good in performance and battery (After i disabled ca. 2 dozen spyware services that also the other Big 4 have..!) that i gave up on Linux and Macs for my personal machines.
One can even run native Ubuntu Linux today under win10 https://www.howtogeek.com/249966/how-to-install-and-use-the-linux-bash-shell-on-windows-10/

Link | Posted on Jul 18, 2017 at 04:27 UTC
In reply to:

Wally Brooks: How about 10-bit color depth, which requires the hardware, OS, monitor, and graphics card are all 10 bit compatible. None of which the Mac supports....

I use Macs at work-CEO mandate- and I use a PC for my photo editing too.

10b on Mac practically started as of 2016 - decades later than on PC. Ironically for the artsy roots of Apple/Mac, this quite belated OS upgrade was not to better serve the artistic / photog communities - neglected till Dec'15, but primarily due to the UHD HDR screens and TVs.

Link | Posted on Jul 18, 2017 at 03:58 UTC
In reply to:

keeponkeepingon: So canon's 10-18 equals 16mm on a full frame sensor (due to a 1.6 crop) while nikons 10-20 with a 1.5 crop will give you 15mm full frame equivalent.

Question: Is that 1mm at that focal length a big deal?

Thanks!

"So canon's 10-18 equals 16mm on a full frame sensor (due to a 1.6 crop) while nikons 10-20 with a 1.5 crop will give you 15mm full frame equivalent."

yes it is, for the 360 panoramas... in some instances the 1.5 vs. 1.6x factor may translate in 30% less shots for a 360 (vs. a Canon 1.6x).
Hence most 360 pros actually avoid the Canon 1.6 cameras.

Link | Posted on Jul 4, 2017 at 15:22 UTC
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