David Franklin

Lives in United States West Bloomfield,, MI, United States
Works as a Photographer, retoucher & sometime designer
Joined on May 23, 2002
About me:

Professional advertising, corporate & editorial photo image-maker for 30 years; digital photography, digital retouching and 3-D pioneer, all since 1996; exclusively using digital capture since early 2002.

Comments

Total: 20, showing: 1 – 20
In reply to:

David Franklin: Well, it looks like Adobe is in serious training to finally "jump the shark" in imaging software. As a great (for) Adobe customer since 1996, who has bought literally tens of thousands of dollars of Adobe products over the years, I am greatly concerned by this mystical BS and corporate suck-upping about the "one true Lightroom" to come. If that means that I will soon only have a "cloud" version of Lightroom to choose, as Adobe will concentrate on the cloud version to the detriment of the so-called Classic version, in order to increase profits from storage and decrease double development costs, I will totally quit Adobe. Period. They might not care, but I do.
I will not have years of my work held hostage to their storage regime, and all the security and up/download speed and capacity issues that would go along with it. I am near fed up with the truly awful sluggishness of the program already; this is probably going to be the straw that breaks the camel's back. Wake up Adobe!

That is nearly irrelevant. If what you mean is that Adobe will "let me" keep copies of my own raw files on my own hard drive, organized into collections or whatever would be Adobe's current organizing version's name, well, that is hardly a feature that would make any difference. I already have that option without paying them for anything. As the functions of the program will still only be available to adhere to the copies in the cloud, so that, in the future, should I want to amend an edit after I no longer have access to the cloud or the program supporting the cloud, I would have lost all the sometimes considerable work put forward up until that point, that arrangement is still unacceptable.

Link | Posted on Oct 18, 2017 at 15:26 UTC

Well, it looks like Adobe is in serious training to finally "jump the shark" in imaging software. As a great (for) Adobe customer since 1996, who has bought literally tens of thousands of dollars of Adobe products over the years, I am greatly concerned by this mystical BS and corporate suck-upping about the "one true Lightroom" to come. If that means that I will soon only have a "cloud" version of Lightroom to choose, as Adobe will concentrate on the cloud version to the detriment of the so-called Classic version, in order to increase profits from storage and decrease double development costs, I will totally quit Adobe. Period. They might not care, but I do.
I will not have years of my work held hostage to their storage regime, and all the security and up/download speed and capacity issues that would go along with it. I am near fed up with the truly awful sluggishness of the program already; this is probably going to be the straw that breaks the camel's back. Wake up Adobe!

Link | Posted on Oct 18, 2017 at 14:51 UTC as 268th comment | 2 replies

This subject is ridiculous, because of the theological certainty with which most hold fast to their own "team" (Mac or PC) choices. Despite that, I will still have my say. I have used Windows, Mac and Unix to do stills post, plus some video and 3-D work, for over 21 (yes 21!) years. I started on Mac, went to Unix, then Windows. I mostly use Windows. Still some Mac. No Unix anymore. Mac is still a wonderful OS, especially now that it's really a subset of Unix with a good GUI. Windows, from NT3 on down, has been great for my work. Windows 10 is mostly better than previous versions. I have none of the weird difficulties so many report. The key: install only your work programs on your PC. Then, do only your work on that PC. Keep up updates. Install minimum security programs. Clean (15 seconds) after after necessary internet use, don't open idiotic emails and do gaming and casual surfing on a machine you don't need to work 24/7. Windows will then work great indefinitely. End of discussion.

Link | Posted on Jul 18, 2017 at 17:00 UTC as 101st comment | 2 replies
In reply to:

David Franklin: It's hard to know where to start in reacting to this "photo essay." I've been a fairly active member of this forum for 15 years. At first, the content here was almost exclusively about gear and the technical aspects of digital imaging, with an occasional foray into examining some great photo work.

With the changes occurring in media in the last 10 years or so, I imagine that it was inevitable that politics would eventually begin to seep into this aspect of the culture, as it has in almost every other one. After all, almost the entire media, as with the Democrat party, academia, most of the very largest corporations, their tech billionaire fellows, and popular entertainment, are fully bathed in left wing ideology, some really believing it, others merely mouthing the platitudes they think will absolve them from guilt and judgment by others for having lived so well. (continued next post)

Finally, if you believe that the people pictured in this essay are representative in any way of the average Trump voter, then I've got a bridge in Brooklyn that I'd like to sell you at an amazingly low price. This photo essay, by a person imagining herself to be a cultural anthropologist like Margaret Meade in "Coming of Age in Samoa," with a camera, visiting the vast homeland of a tribe of ignorant yahoos, is sadly deluded by her own weird presuppositions and, obviously, made no real effort to understand the people she pretended to portray.

Link | Posted on Jun 4, 2017 at 17:02 UTC
In reply to:

David Franklin: It's hard to know where to start in reacting to this "photo essay." I've been a fairly active member of this forum for 15 years. At first, the content here was almost exclusively about gear and the technical aspects of digital imaging, with an occasional foray into examining some great photo work.

With the changes occurring in media in the last 10 years or so, I imagine that it was inevitable that politics would eventually begin to seep into this aspect of the culture, as it has in almost every other one. After all, almost the entire media, as with the Democrat party, academia, most of the very largest corporations, their tech billionaire fellows, and popular entertainment, are fully bathed in left wing ideology, some really believing it, others merely mouthing the platitudes they think will absolve them from guilt and judgment by others for having lived so well. (continued next post)

The pictures are all OK. They are, of course, highly derivative, and perhaps a conscious or unconscious paean to Diane Arbus. The obvious political slant and clearly ignorant definition of her subjects is obviously a sneering pile of condescension mixed with feelings of unearned superiority. When this person does a photo essay of upper West side Manhattan "sophisticates" and Silicon valley dowagers showing them underpaying their illegal Mexican and Guatemalan maids and gardeners, picturing them show up for "Resistance" rallies in their full-size Mercedes after just having had their spa treatments, flying to global warming conferences in their private jets, chauffeured from their 8,000 square foot homes located in gated communities or multimillion dollar hi-rise penthouses that are protected by armed guards, to their aromatherapy sessions, then and only then will I think that this essay is anything but a fantasy of one-sided, inaccurate and ignorant political bile. (continued next)

Link | Posted on Jun 4, 2017 at 17:01 UTC
In reply to:

David Franklin: It's hard to know where to start in reacting to this "photo essay." I've been a fairly active member of this forum for 15 years. At first, the content here was almost exclusively about gear and the technical aspects of digital imaging, with an occasional foray into examining some great photo work.

With the changes occurring in media in the last 10 years or so, I imagine that it was inevitable that politics would eventually begin to seep into this aspect of the culture, as it has in almost every other one. After all, almost the entire media, as with the Democrat party, academia, most of the very largest corporations, their tech billionaire fellows, and popular entertainment, are fully bathed in left wing ideology, some really believing it, others merely mouthing the platitudes they think will absolve them from guilt and judgment by others for having lived so well. (continued next post)

DPR, located in Seattle and London, and ultimately funded by Silicon Valley, could not be immune from the currents of the culture in which it floats. It has been apparent for some time, but, as a politically conservative person who somewhat reluctantly voted for President Trump, I think that publishing this essay, without perhaps a disclaimer of editorial neutrality with it, is finally beyond the pale for me. With this publication, DPR has, well and true, joined the "Resistance." I am not against anyone's right to say, photograph or express in any way or form their opinions, and to publish in any way the result of those views, whatever they may be. However, and this is an important point for those whose reflex reaction is to cry "censorship" or other such characterizations, that doesn't mean that I have to accept their viewpoints, or like them, or praise them, or wish to view them in an outlet that I had previously enjoyed without such political grandstanding. (continued next post)

Link | Posted on Jun 4, 2017 at 16:59 UTC

It's hard to know where to start in reacting to this "photo essay." I've been a fairly active member of this forum for 15 years. At first, the content here was almost exclusively about gear and the technical aspects of digital imaging, with an occasional foray into examining some great photo work.

With the changes occurring in media in the last 10 years or so, I imagine that it was inevitable that politics would eventually begin to seep into this aspect of the culture, as it has in almost every other one. After all, almost the entire media, as with the Democrat party, academia, most of the very largest corporations, their tech billionaire fellows, and popular entertainment, are fully bathed in left wing ideology, some really believing it, others merely mouthing the platitudes they think will absolve them from guilt and judgment by others for having lived so well. (continued next post)

Link | Posted on Jun 4, 2017 at 16:58 UTC as 24th comment | 18 replies

I hope that the otherwise innocuous bullet point near the end of the list - fixing the "memory leak" - is really the important fix I hope it is. Using Lightroom on my very, very highly specified and powerful new PC has been tortuous, with the program bogging down to 1990-like computing speed, moving as through molasses with the display taking forever to refresh the images after making adjustments. Yes, I know, use the new fast graphics processor, or don't use it, never mind: nothing works short of turning the program off and back on again, a pathetic "cure." Here's hoping!

Link | Posted on Mar 9, 2017 at 00:46 UTC as 15th comment | 2 replies
On article Opinion: Why the Canon XC10 is a big deal (811 comments in total)

I don't yet know either if I would consider buying the XC10 or if it is a good value for its intended market. But, I do think that the majority of posters here are at least very premature in their judgments. As to the sensor size, any low/medium cost, self-contained 4k-capable device pretty much requires this smaller than APS-C size sensor to cut down on processing overhead and heat generation. As to the fixed lens, it is either desirable or not, depending on an individual's needs, but it certainly covers an ample range. As to the form factor, it seems to be superior for its intended dual role. As to the memory card options, the Cfast cards will, of course, quickly become cheaper. As to the competition, there is nothing precisely like it now, and every cheaper or like-priced alternative has its own trade-offs and shortcomings. Bottom line: Wait and see before you jump to declare this camera a "failure."

Regards, David

Link | Posted on Apr 8, 2015 at 17:42 UTC as 257th comment | 1 reply
On a photo in the Tamron SP 15-30mm f/2.8 Di VC USD Samples sample gallery (4 comments in total)

The produce stand shot shows some decentering and/or some interesting curvature of field, mostly probably the latter. In the far right corner, a sign is pretty sharply rendered while in the near right corner, the image is out of focus, despite the overall sharp focus being on the nearest rows of produce and the good sharpness of the near lower left corner.

Overall, it looks like a very good piece of glass, with performance that rivals more expensive lenses, but, it looks to have some significant flaws as well.

Regards,
David

Link | Posted on Feb 25, 2015 at 17:07 UTC as 2nd comment
On photo 03 Dan_2505_15mm_f2.8 in dpreview review samples's photo gallery (4 comments in total)

The produce stand shot shows some decentering and/or some interesting curvature of field, mostly probably the latter. In the far right corner, a sign is pretty sharply rendered while in the near right corner, the image is out of focus, despite the overall sharp focus being on the nearest rows of produce and the good sharpness of the near lower left corner.

Overall, it looks like a very good piece of glass, with performance that rivals more expensive lenses, but, it looks to have some significant flaws as well.

Regards,
David

Link | Posted on Feb 25, 2015 at 17:07 UTC as 2nd comment
On photo BETASAMPLE_ISO400_DSCF0471 in dpreview review samples's photo gallery (3 comments in total)
In reply to:

(unknown member): While I don't care for how the bar shot of the horn players looks (yellow and plastic like) this one is very good. I assume this was shot at iso 400 to use the DR extending option. I like it.

The camera's sensor/software handles the extremely difficult herringbone pattern of the woman's shirt very well. I'm impressed! The high ISO shots are also really nice, and the grain is very pleasing to the eye. I also love the viewfinder concept and the "old-timey" physical camera controls. These are not just nostalgic fodder; anyone who has used a well designed film SLR understands that these physical buttons and dials are superior to menu-driven controls, for actual picture taking, about 85% of the time. If I could afford one of these right now, I'd buy it. This would be a "personal" camera for me - not on my professional budget. Too bad my mortgage, home credit card bills, and my son's university expenses are interfering with my camera lust. One more year to go before my son's graduate school starts - maybe a short interlude for me then.

Regards,
David

Link | Posted on Sep 24, 2014 at 16:23 UTC
On a photo in the Fujifilm X100T (beta) Real-world samples sample gallery (3 comments in total)
In reply to:

(unknown member): While I don't care for how the bar shot of the horn players looks (yellow and plastic like) this one is very good. I assume this was shot at iso 400 to use the DR extending option. I like it.

The camera's sensor/software handles the extremely difficult herringbone pattern of the woman's shirt very well. I'm impressed! The high ISO shots are also really nice, and the grain is very pleasing to the eye. I also love the viewfinder concept and the "old-timey" physical camera controls. These are not just nostalgic fodder; anyone who has used a well designed film SLR understands that these physical buttons and dials are superior to menu-driven controls, for actual picture taking, about 85% of the time. If I could afford one of these right now, I'd buy it. This would be a "personal" camera for me - not on my professional budget. Too bad my mortgage, home credit card bills, and my son's university expenses are interfering with my camera lust. One more year to go before my son's graduate school starts - maybe a short interlude for me then.

Regards,
David

Link | Posted on Sep 24, 2014 at 16:23 UTC
On article Hasselblad unveils pixel-shifting 200MP H5D-200c MS (231 comments in total)

Many years ago, around maybe year 2000 or so, I bought an Imacon 4-step shifting back for my 2x3 view camera. Had to return it, because the native software rendered the very detailed images with a strange subtle underlying checkerboard pattern.I'm quite sure they've cured this by now. Otherwise, beside some inelegent native software, it was a very nice package. Would be fun to just stare at 200 mp images at 100% on my monitor.

Regards,
David

Link | Posted on Aug 22, 2014 at 18:24 UTC as 55th comment | 3 replies
On article Adobe releases Lightroom 4.4 and Adobe Camera Raw 7.4 (50 comments in total)
In reply to:

gl2k: I downloaded and installed the 7.4 DNG converter. Everything went fine except ... CS6 still shows me Camera RAW 7.3
The new converter is properly installed since I can launch it.
Any ideas or did I get anything wrong ?

Just thought others may be helped by my experience today. I tried to follow the directions Adobe recommends -to update from the updater in the Photoshop menu itself, which I usually do anyway. I have Master Collection CS6 on WIN 7 64-bit. I hit the update command and it failed to carry out the update; it failed three times in a row, even after I restarted the computer and did all the other tricks I usually try - all to no avail. Finally, I called Adobe. After the usual time wasting process, they finally addressed the issue by telling me I had to reinstall Photoshop CS6. I did. Then the update for Camera Raw 7.4 finally worked. Great update process!

Link | Posted on Apr 3, 2013 at 20:28 UTC
On article Just posted: Hands-on preview of the Canon EOS 100D/SL1 (379 comments in total)
In reply to:

David Franklin: Well, most of these comments just prove that the internet is the true home of the great critical thinkers and corproate product analysts of the 21st Century. Not.

This camera is probably a very good idea. I hate to seem to "defend" a billion-dollar corporation, but so many comments here that this camera is not enough of an innovation for them is merely a reflection of their own narrow and relentles search for the "next thing" that conforms to their own narrative.

To me, smaller is better, with a 40mm pancake for vacations and weekend walk arounds. Takes my Canon lenses and HAS AN OPTICAL VIEWFINDER, so I don't have to view on an LCD, hold the cam awkwardly and put an extra layer between my eye and the world. I know about the add-on optical and shoe-mounted EVF's, and the more expensive cams with built-in EVF's. They make mirrorless cams more tolerable, but also, more expensive, and still don't compare to the viewing experience of even the puny optical viewfinders of the Rebel series.

Lawrtencew, I agree with you, not that the 40 is useless - and especially not since it's also great on full frame - but that I'd like just one other pancake in the 16mm to 24mm range as well, to yield a wide angle for the new APS cam. With that and the 40mm, it would make a great kit for traveling with minimum size and weight. The APS zooms are OK and would be useful, but would be just a hair awkward and counterproductive on this shrunken DSLR.

Link | Posted on Mar 22, 2013 at 15:41 UTC
On article Just posted: Hands-on preview of the Canon EOS 100D/SL1 (379 comments in total)

Well, most of these comments just prove that the internet is the true home of the great critical thinkers and corproate product analysts of the 21st Century. Not.

This camera is probably a very good idea. I hate to seem to "defend" a billion-dollar corporation, but so many comments here that this camera is not enough of an innovation for them is merely a reflection of their own narrow and relentles search for the "next thing" that conforms to their own narrative.

To me, smaller is better, with a 40mm pancake for vacations and weekend walk arounds. Takes my Canon lenses and HAS AN OPTICAL VIEWFINDER, so I don't have to view on an LCD, hold the cam awkwardly and put an extra layer between my eye and the world. I know about the add-on optical and shoe-mounted EVF's, and the more expensive cams with built-in EVF's. They make mirrorless cams more tolerable, but also, more expensive, and still don't compare to the viewing experience of even the puny optical viewfinders of the Rebel series.

Link | Posted on Mar 22, 2013 at 01:26 UTC as 45th comment | 12 replies
In reply to:

Mike604: Like the Bible says pride comes before a fall. Nokia/Microsoft together are a sinking ship. With Steve ballet @ the wheel, no wonder they are sinking. Nokia raised the bar, yes but did not blow anything away. A great camera in an outdated OS and low class hardware doesn't work, period. Adios Amigo.

Your reply was either strangely biased or just massively uninformed. I just bought a Nokia 920 in the U.S., after not owning one for about 15 years. It is pretty much sold-out everywhere in the world within weeks of becoming available.

Despite some of the iOS "imprinted" media being routinely skeptical of anything un-Apple, a huge plurality of those who try one, buy one, and of those that own them, almost everyone really loves the phone. This is already, and is likely to continue to be, a smashing success for Nokia. As a former iPhone and Android user, I think it is the best phone I've ever used. And, of course, the camera is quite good, good enough for me to many times abandon my Canon SX230 HS for snapshots. If it had a real optical zoom and a slightly bigger sensor, that would about do it. Good job Dinning! And, good luck with those Range Rovers and Jaguars. Tata, it'll be off to India with you; I guess it's warmer there than in Finland.

Link | Posted on Nov 27, 2012 at 00:55 UTC

I'm a little confused. I get that it sounds like, in certain circumstances where color fidelity matters, that these facts suggest saving Jpegs at "6" rather than "7" on Photoshop's compressdion slider. But, does that mean that color is more true at 6 than 8? How about 10 or 12? Is the color still better at 6? It doesn't sound reasonable, but I'd like to know from someone who has a greater understanding of this issue than I do. What about it? What compression numbers on the slider yield significantly more accurate color, as well as, of course, better results regarding the other methods of evaluation of compression results, such as detail retention and artifacts?

Link | Posted on Aug 30, 2011 at 02:47 UTC as 29th comment
Total: 20, showing: 1 – 20