Entropius

Lives in United States Tucson, AZ, United States
Works as a Physics PhD Candidate
Joined on Jul 17, 2006

Comments

Total: 550, showing: 1 – 20
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In reply to:

photographytragic: I had my Nikon 35Ti break twice on long airplane flights. Was never on the floor, always in a lap bag.
It would purr before it died. Nikon did the first fix begrudgingly, but refused the second, said operator error!
Modern mirrorless with in-body stabilisation also have alarming sympathetic vibrations.
My Sony A7RIV's are a classic example.
Sure, Covid stopped long flights, but 2000km on corrugated roads have not broken them or even displaced the sensor slightly , even with that sensor-mount issue (that my early units would have)

Interesting.

I have a D500 and Z6 and I put them somewhat through hell. Both have been absolute workhorses -- except the Z6 broke when I dropped it onto a hard surface from 130cm, and the D500's screen died long ago. The Z6 got a new shutter and is good as new, and the D500 doesn't really need its screen.

Link | Posted on Sep 14, 2021 at 01:28 UTC
In reply to:

FujifilmXT3: It runs Windows not MacOS so no thank you

It runs whatever you install on it.

Mine runs Linux, for instance.

Link | Posted on Sep 11, 2021 at 12:59 UTC
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ralphthemagician: I have one of these and love it. It's just as amazing as every review says it is. But…

This thing is LOUD. Under full load it is incredibly loud… almost impressively so. Not one mention of this in the review.

Mine is not. You can hear the fans with the GPU and CPU at full frequency and load, of course, but mine is not loud.

Link | Posted on Sep 11, 2021 at 12:58 UTC
In reply to:

MinAZ: So okay if I am interested mainly in Adobe and related apps (Portrait editing apps, etc...), how does this compare with the G14 just reviewed a few days ago? I realize the G14 is a gaming laptop and this is an editing laptop, but I don't want to just assume this is the better option given that sometimes gaming rigs do well in other applications too.

The G14 and G15 (Asus models) are very professional looking. I use one as a professor in my classes. They aren't as rugged as Dell XPS's, but they are great machines and mine has been a workhorse for my job; they're hardly flimsy.

Link | Posted on Sep 8, 2021 at 22:39 UTC
In reply to:

Fixx: Now, can you install OSX to it?

Check out Darktable. The interface can be a little intimidating just because of how *many* different tools there are, but the results are quite good, and critically you don't have to use anywhere near all of the tools.

Valve has done fantastic things for Linux gaming. Proton is very good, but as you say it would be nice if there were a lot more things that are compatible with Vulkan natively. (I currently use some software I wrote that uses OpenGL 2 in my research; someday I will port it to Vulkan once I understand the system better...)

Link | Posted on Sep 5, 2021 at 15:24 UTC
In reply to:

User1234567890: I knew it was gonna be cheaper than Macbook.

@Raist3d, I'm curious why that is. I've noticed that on the code I care most about right now (which is multicore friendly but doesn't use AVX heavily), there isn't that much difference between 15W and 35W. It's possible that this "Cinema 4D" benchmark consists almost exclusively of power-hungry AVX operations, perhaps? I don't know. But most benchmarks I've seen, plus my own tests, indicate that the last 70% of power just buys you another 15-20% of speed.

Link | Posted on Sep 3, 2021 at 21:26 UTC
In reply to:

MinAZ: So okay if I am interested mainly in Adobe and related apps (Portrait editing apps, etc...), how does this compare with the G14 just reviewed a few days ago? I realize the G14 is a gaming laptop and this is an editing laptop, but I don't want to just assume this is the better option given that sometimes gaming rigs do well in other applications too.

Both of them will perform very very well, to the point where you should decide based on other factors.

Link | Posted on Sep 3, 2021 at 21:04 UTC
In reply to:

User1234567890: I knew it was gonna be cheaper than Macbook.

@unhappymeal

You can tune the power budget of Ryzens in detail. It turns out that the difference between Ryzen at 16W and Ryzen at 35W isn't that big.

This is easy to test, too, since there are 15W laptop Ryzens too. See https://www.anandtech.com/show/16446/amd-ryzen-9-5980hs-cezanne-review-ryzen-5000-mobile-tested/7 .

It looks like the difference between 35W and 15W is about 10% performance on a Zen 3. This matches what I've seen doing testing on my Zen 2 laptop.

Link | Posted on Sep 3, 2021 at 21:03 UTC
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SunsetMagnet: whatever, as long the os is Windows, no thanks.

You can install Linux on them since Windows sucks, y'know.

Link | Posted on Sep 3, 2021 at 21:00 UTC
In reply to:

zodiacfml: Not bad testing from DPR. I was wondering a few days ago whether the 16GB in the M1 products is good enough for me (never had an Apple product)...turns out that multiple browser tabs (even with sleep/discard extensions) will almost use the available memory.
The only problem with this test is the high cost of the 32GB model, way too high than the 16GB M1 variants.

The only time I reboot my linux system is when there's a security critical kernel update...

Link | Posted on Sep 3, 2021 at 15:20 UTC
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MinAZ: I am on the verge of springing for this, but can anyone verify that these claims are credible? A laptop for $2000 that can compete with even a 1 year old desktop seems out of the reach of technical probability. Needless to say if this is true, I am buying at least one (if not more) of these laptops for my work and personal use! For those of us that haven't benchmarked our desktops in a while, can this truly replace a desktop, and if not, what level of performance (I would take 90% of my desktop performance honestly, doesn't need to match).
Don't care it looks like a "gaming laptop" just means less likely to be stolen! And as for the display, yeah its fine not that critical anyway and you can always hook it up.

@MinAz

These claims are absolutely credible. The eight-core Ryzen 3 CPU in the G14 is exceptionally fast. Some tests (at https://www.anandtech.com/show/16446/amd-ryzen-9-5980hs-cezanne-review-ryzen-5000-mobile-tested/7 ) show that it's basically as fast as a six-core desktop Ryzen 3 (which uses more power).

You can get desktop CPU's that are faster than this; the desktop Ryzen 3's go up to sixteen cores. If you need *that* kind of power, then you still need a desktop. But a 16-core Ryzen 3 is a monster compared to what almost anyone uses.

So this laptop is competitive with all but the highest-end desktops.

It's the same on the GPU front. The GPU (mobile GTX 3060) isn't as fast as the highest-end desktop parts, but you can't even *buy* those these days. For most use? It is very fast.

I'm a computational physicist and am very demanding on my machines, and my previous-gen G14 has handled everything I've thrown at it easily. Highly recommend.

Link | Posted on Sep 3, 2021 at 15:19 UTC
In reply to:

Fixx: Now, can you install OSX to it?

@unhappymeal

It is fantastic to have built-in support for Linux tools. This is why I run Linux. :)

Link | Posted on Sep 3, 2021 at 15:10 UTC
In reply to:

ewelch: Sounds like a good option for PC users. But the M1's clearly superior battery life, Thunderbolt, and MacOS, means it's no M1 killer.

I know the display on the 2021 G14 is much better than the 2020 G14 that I have. It's one of the few weak points of this machine.

Link | Posted on Aug 31, 2021 at 05:18 UTC
In reply to:

AlejandroI: Great laptop until the fans hits in.... or after you unplug the laptop and performance goes to the ground... basically is a desktop that you can move around and with loud fans.

When you buy a computer, you buy some hardware. It comes with software; you are free to run other software on it.

This isn't overclocking or doing anything nuts. (I have never overclocked a computer.) There are no particular risks from allowing a processor like this to run at its full turbo frequency on battery. I didn't have to do anything special to do this, nor did I "override" anything. I'm sure that enabling turbo frequencies while on battery on Windows is simply a matter of changing power profile -- nothing bonkers.

Gamers do all kinds of weird stuff for another 2% performance, mostly just for bragging rights.

Link | Posted on Aug 30, 2021 at 23:09 UTC
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ZeroOne01: How is it a MacBook killer? Clickbaiting title, eh?

It's much prettier.

**looks at his G14 running KDE**

Link | Posted on Aug 30, 2021 at 19:22 UTC
In reply to:

AlejandroI: Great laptop until the fans hits in.... or after you unplug the laptop and performance goes to the ground... basically is a desktop that you can move around and with loud fans.

The point is that CPU performance throttling on battery is handled by software. If the software is not doing what you want it to do, it's not the machine's fault; it's the software.

There are utilities for Windows that let you change the CPU governor. Gamers are very familiar with these. If the default CPU frequency scaling is not to your liking, change it. But don't blame the machine.

Link | Posted on Aug 30, 2021 at 19:21 UTC
In reply to:

PaulSnowcat: Packing THIS power (CPU and 3060) in THIS small package may be a very good idea for marketing but is a very bad idea for real life. You cannot use this power on a constant basis. For example you cannot launch DXO for a large batch of files or you cannot play games on it.
Why? It will overheat heavily. It's case will be so hot that you will not able to touch it and eventually it will receive thermal damage. I've seen MANY damaged ultrabooks that were too powerful for an ultrabook concept.
I prefer ultrabooks that use JUST AMD Ryzen with no discreet GPU, they are MUCH more stable for long 100% system load sessions. Ryzens, unlike Intels, have quite good acceptable GPUs built in them...

The integrated graphics in the Ryzen mobile CPU's are just fine.

I've also used my G14 to play games, with sustained high load on both CPU and GPU. It doesn't melt.

Link | Posted on Aug 30, 2021 at 11:54 UTC
In reply to:

AlejandroI: Great laptop until the fans hits in.... or after you unplug the laptop and performance goes to the ground... basically is a desktop that you can move around and with loud fans.

What OS are you running those things on? I've done mine on both Ubuntu and Fedora.

The CPU doesn't care where it gets its power from, and the battery is happy to provide power at least up to the CPU short-burst power limit. There is no technical reason why the CPU can't run at full turbo on battery.

Software may limit it, of course. Those benchmarks may have been done on Windows where the CPU governor limits performance on battery. Who knows what Windows does?

But you can use whatever CPU governor you want, including ones that give you full performance on battery.

Link | Posted on Aug 30, 2021 at 11:51 UTC
In reply to:

AlejandroI: Great laptop until the fans hits in.... or after you unplug the laptop and performance goes to the ground... basically is a desktop that you can move around and with loud fans.

I have the previous generation G14.

I've done performance tuning of multithreaded computational physics code on it while running on battery (since I wanted to work outside for a while).

There is no performance hit on battery worth speaking of (on the cpu -- this code isn't gpu-friendly).

Link | Posted on Aug 30, 2021 at 05:37 UTC
In reply to:

BrentSchumer: Any review isn't useful unless you test whether or not a laptop throttles under sustained load.

I have the previous generation G14.

There is no thermal throttling worth worrying about. It's much better than Intels.

Link | Posted on Aug 30, 2021 at 05:33 UTC
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