BrianVS

Joined on Feb 27, 2020

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Total: 30, showing: 1 – 20
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On article Film Fridays: Requiem for all my broken 35mm cameras (97 comments in total)
In reply to:

sibuzaru: that's why the future of film depends on new cameras to be made, all those old gear might still feel plenty but they will break and 99% of the case is unrepairable

I learned on the Minolta Hi-Matic 9, which has a "Programmed" mode where it sets shutter speed and F-Stop. Rangefinder focusing, F1.7 lens. Built like a tank, mine still works. Easy enough for an 11 year old to use, over 50 years ago. Still works.

Doing a new auto-focus/auto-exposure camera with a decent lens will be expensive if in-production modules cannot be used. The non-recurring engineering and cost for limited production will be expensive. It's all do-able, but might be $1500 for a Leica Mini.

This would be nice for a Light Meter:
https://www.adafruit.com/product/1980?gclid=EAIaIQobChMI7LT3wvnt6gIVCpyzCh0vYg6zEAQYASABEgIi7_D_BwE

Built in ADC, interface to a microcontroller.

I can't find a suitable AF module.

BUT- entire Shutter/AF/Lens/Light meter modules-

https://www.surplusshed.com/pages/item/M3059.html

If you wanted a limited production, and had a good 3D solid printer- you could buy up some of these surplus modules and spin your own.
That would be cool.

Link | Posted on Jul 27, 2020 at 17:26 UTC
On article Film Fridays: Requiem for all my broken 35mm cameras (97 comments in total)
In reply to:

farmersteve: I keep telling people we need new film cameras to be manufactured but people keep saying there are millions of them out there. But, have you seen the prices some of these get these days? Time for someone to step up and start making new compact film cameras.

My Leica Mini is still going strong- but the Minolta AL-E and Canonet QL17l will outlast it. The latter two are about the same size as the Leica CL. Both work properly after a cleaning, flood-clean the shutter, new light seals, and soldering a broken wire on the battery compartment. Both cost me under $50. They would both sell for about $100 each, now that they are working.

https://cameraderie.org/threads/minolta-al-e-removing-top-cover-to-clean-the-viewfinder.50172/#post-370080

https://cameraderie.org/threads/but-really-which-film-rangefinder-should-i-try.48970/
I ended up selling the OP above a Ricoh 500G for $35, included shipping. The 500G needed the seals changed, top popped to clean the viewfinder. I got it in the box of broken cameras sent for doing some repair work. The Ricoh is very compact.

http://mattsclassiccameras.com/rangefinders-compacts/ricoh-500g/

We should get an article together for comparing size of various cameras.

Link | Posted on Jul 27, 2020 at 15:13 UTC
On article Film Fridays: Requiem for all my broken 35mm cameras (97 comments in total)
In reply to:

farmersteve: I keep telling people we need new film cameras to be manufactured but people keep saying there are millions of them out there. But, have you seen the prices some of these get these days? Time for someone to step up and start making new compact film cameras.

For Nikon Shooters:

https://richardhaw.com/2018/11/23/repair-nikon-fm2n/

Richard Haw has some of the best online tutorials for repairing Nikon cameras and lenses available. The specific link is for the Nikon FM2n. Check his Home Page for many projects done over the years. I've learned a lot from that web site, a real Go To place,

Link | Posted on Jul 26, 2020 at 21:48 UTC
On article Film Fridays: Requiem for all my broken 35mm cameras (97 comments in total)
In reply to:

farmersteve: I keep telling people we need new film cameras to be manufactured but people keep saying there are millions of them out there. But, have you seen the prices some of these get these days? Time for someone to step up and start making new compact film cameras.

https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/reflexcamera/reflex-bringing-back-the-analogue-slr-camera

The Reflex Camera Kickstarter project, camera due out 2 years ago. Read the updates for why the camera was delayed. Tells a lot about bringing a new camera to market.

Cosina brought out the Bessaflex in early 2000, Nikon brought out the S3-2000 and the SP-2005. The S3-2000 can be picked up LNIB for $1500 or so with the Millenium Nikkor 50/1.4, Nikon's best 50mm F1.4 lens ever.. Mine will work long after I am gone.

Link | Posted on Jul 26, 2020 at 20:33 UTC
On article Film Fridays: Requiem for all my broken 35mm cameras (97 comments in total)
In reply to:

farmersteve: I keep telling people we need new film cameras to be manufactured but people keep saying there are millions of them out there. But, have you seen the prices some of these get these days? Time for someone to step up and start making new compact film cameras.

Best advice for someone wanting to buy a film camera in working condition: post a Want to Buy on a camera forum that has an active film forum. Have a return privilege. I have the FM and FG- both bought new, both work, neither needed the mirror box removed. I've seen batteries leak, causing damage- usually fixed by removing the bottom plate and soldering.

Most camera repairs are easy fixes, some cameras easier to work on than others. Rangefinder cameras are generally easier to work on than SLR's. YMMV, I write software for a living. How many programmers does it take to repair a Nikon F2, Nikon EM, Contax IIIa, Kiev 4, Fed 1, Zorki 3M, Konica T3, Konica C35, Canonet QL17 GIII, Retina Reflex-S, Retina IIIS, Retina IIa, Konica S2, ... 1.

Don't buy a broken camera if you have no interest in spending some time learning how to fix it. Nor do you need to buy a brand new camera because you are afraid that a 50 year old camera cannot possibly work.

Link | Posted on Jul 26, 2020 at 20:23 UTC
On article Film Fridays: Requiem for all my broken 35mm cameras (97 comments in total)
In reply to:

farmersteve: I keep telling people we need new film cameras to be manufactured but people keep saying there are millions of them out there. But, have you seen the prices some of these get these days? Time for someone to step up and start making new compact film cameras.

Then stick with a Nikon F, No foam to worry about around the mirror box, just replace the mirror bumper. I've had four Nikon F's given to me over the last few years. All working, needed the bumper replaced. I bought my first Nikon F in 1978, still have it- works great. Nikon F2a- bought new 1978. The other 60 or so Nikons, collected over the last 40+ years. All working. Going back to the Nikon M no-sync.

Typically the cameras need the light seals replaced around the camera back. Lots on online tutorials.

The Konica T3 that I picked up with a Konica 50/1.4 for $50, needed the top popped. Found a tutorial for it, never opened one before.

Most of these cameras are far easier to work on than some would have you believe. They were made to be serviceable, take about an hour for a technician to do. These days- a professional shop charges upwards of $200 to do a full CLA. A few good screwdrivers, needle-nosed pliers, a light oil for camera repair off Ebay: I have a lot of repaired cameras.

Link | Posted on Jul 26, 2020 at 18:24 UTC
On article Film Fridays: Requiem for all my broken 35mm cameras (97 comments in total)
In reply to:

farmersteve: I keep telling people we need new film cameras to be manufactured but people keep saying there are millions of them out there. But, have you seen the prices some of these get these days? Time for someone to step up and start making new compact film cameras.

That's about 5x what the FM10 used to sell for.

I picked up a user Black Nikon FM funder $50 with shipping, needed new light seals.

With millions of working cameras on the market, better quality and selling for 10% the price of a new FM10- how many people that want to "just try" film are going to put out $500 for a new body and lens?

My Daughter had to do a Web Project, needed pictures, etc-

http://camerageekgear.com/home.html

The FAKE camera shop. BUT- I used realistic prices for these cameras and lenses. If things go like they have been...

Link | Posted on Jul 26, 2020 at 12:45 UTC
On article Film Fridays: Requiem for all my broken 35mm cameras (97 comments in total)
In reply to:

sibuzaru: that's why the future of film depends on new cameras to be made, all those old gear might still feel plenty but they will break and 99% of the case is unrepairable

Youxin Ye started camera repair as a hobby, then part-time as a favor, now full-time. With shops like Essex Camera gone, Do-it-Yourself'rs get asked to repair photography equipment for others. I've worked on hundreds of Jupiter and Sonnar lenses for others, happy that I can now refer people to Skyllaney to do this professionally.

If you choose to repair the X700- photograph the disassembly and procedure for others to follow. If it's a common problem that is easy to fix, others may have some luck. After picking up a Black Nikon F2 for $25, and unjamming it in 10 minutes, documented the procedure. Some of this stuff is easy, but not intuitive.

Link | Posted on Jul 26, 2020 at 12:39 UTC
On article Film Fridays: Requiem for all my broken 35mm cameras (97 comments in total)
In reply to:

sibuzaru: that's why the future of film depends on new cameras to be made, all those old gear might still feel plenty but they will break and 99% of the case is unrepairable

The Shutter in the Yashica Electro Series is electronic, uses capacitors- which over time will need to be replaced. In general, cameras that use electronics are more difficult to repair. It can be done, but requires electronic repair. I have several dead electronic cameras, Minolta Electro-Shot, Yashica GT, Minolta HiMatic E, etc. The electronics boards in them died. With a mechanically controlled camera, cleaning out old lubricants and grime and relubing bring a camera back to life. If you have a source for Yashica electronics boards, or a technician that can do component-level repair on the board, the camera is repairable.
The lens on the Yashica is 1st rate.
When I bought my Minolta HiMatic 9 in 1969, did not think I'd be taking it apart in 2020 to clean. But it does not surprise me. My next door neighbor gave me a "broken" 8mm camera at about the same time I bought the Minolta. I fixed the 8mm movie camera, used it for several years. I was 11.

Link | Posted on Jul 25, 2020 at 16:32 UTC
On article Film Fridays: Requiem for all my broken 35mm cameras (97 comments in total)
In reply to:

BrianVS: If you want a reliable 35mm camera that will be working long after the youngest photographer of today lives to enjoy a ripe-old age, pick up a better made mechanical camera, even those with a built-in light meter. Most from the 1950s and 1960s are easy to work on, have online tutorials. Nikon, Canon, Contax and Leica have specialist to repair them. Kodak Retina cameras have online tutorials, and a specialist in New Zealand that rebuilds them. Parts are still available.

If the author needs some suggestions for a good film camera to buy- just ask. I've had people send me boxes of inoperative cameras -mostly fixed-lens RF cameras- in payment for doing some lens repair. Half of them just needed the shutters flood cleaned, top popped and finder cleaned, and new seals. No parts required. I gave many of them away to younger photographers wanting to shoot film.

https://cameraderie.org/threads/classic-rangefinder-cameras-are-high-fashion.38955/#post-264809

As an example- My "Capital Gang" of folding Kodak Retinas. All 3- Under $100, DIY repair required. The 1B was $25, needed the shutter to be flood-cleaned. The IIIC was $70, needed a new front element - which is where parts cameras come in handy. The IIB- repair a lens for a friend, get a camera as a unexpected gift.

Link | Posted on Jul 24, 2020 at 21:49 UTC
On article Film Fridays: Requiem for all my broken 35mm cameras (97 comments in total)

If you want a reliable 35mm camera that will be working long after the youngest photographer of today lives to enjoy a ripe-old age, pick up a better made mechanical camera, even those with a built-in light meter. Most from the 1950s and 1960s are easy to work on, have online tutorials. Nikon, Canon, Contax and Leica have specialist to repair them. Kodak Retina cameras have online tutorials, and a specialist in New Zealand that rebuilds them. Parts are still available.

If the author needs some suggestions for a good film camera to buy- just ask. I've had people send me boxes of inoperative cameras -mostly fixed-lens RF cameras- in payment for doing some lens repair. Half of them just needed the shutters flood cleaned, top popped and finder cleaned, and new seals. No parts required. I gave many of them away to younger photographers wanting to shoot film.

Link | Posted on Jul 24, 2020 at 21:32 UTC as 24th comment | 1 reply
On article Film Fridays: Requiem for all my broken 35mm cameras (97 comments in total)
In reply to:

sibuzaru: that's why the future of film depends on new cameras to be made, all those old gear might still feel plenty but they will break and 99% of the case is unrepairable

The Author's choice of film equipment is very bad, and in no way reflects cameras made for professionals and serious amateurs. Most of the cameras that failed were electronic P&S cameras, "Plastic Fantasticks" of the 80s and 90s. The Yashica Electro G series was an early electronic camera, prone to failure. The Leica Cl was physically damaged by the author.

Link | Posted on Jul 24, 2020 at 21:29 UTC
On article Film Fridays: Requiem for all my broken 35mm cameras (97 comments in total)

https://cameraderie.org/threads/minolta-himatic-9-flood-cleaning-shutter-and-cleaning-viewfinder-also-applies-to-the-7-7s-and-11.50150/

https://cameraderie.org/threads/minolta-al-e-removing-top-cover-to-clean-the-viewfinder.50172/

https://cameraderie.org/threads/unjamming-a-nikon-f2-a-likely-place-to-look.47979/

Forget the little posh platic junk from the 80s and 90s. Get something that was made to last. I've had my Minolta HiMatic 9 sice 1969. Easy to work on, easy to repair.

Skip the junk.

Link | Posted on Jul 24, 2020 at 18:49 UTC as 29th comment

Much less expensive than a Kodak NC2000.

I suspect that Sony gave a large discount to have their equipment used by AP. What's NG shooting with these days?

Link | Posted on Jul 23, 2020 at 15:59 UTC as 183rd comment | 1 reply
In reply to:

BrianVS: 42mm 0.75mm Thread Pitch- T-Mount. Which does not stand for Tokina, but was introduced by Tamron. But it use to be very popular.

I have the Vivitar 600/8 Solid-Cat, Perkin-Elmer. Would be interesting to see how it compares with the 45 year old lens.

Mirror lenses are light, can get away with a monopod instead of a tripod to steady things up.

True about the weight on the Cat. I also use a 500/8 Reflex Nikkor.

Link | Posted on Jul 23, 2020 at 15:48 UTC

42mm 0.75mm Thread Pitch- T-Mount. Which does not stand for Tokina, but was introduced by Tamron. But it use to be very popular.

I have the Vivitar 600/8 Solid-Cat, Perkin-Elmer. Would be interesting to see how it compares with the 45 year old lens.

Mirror lenses are light, can get away with a monopod instead of a tripod to steady things up.

Link | Posted on Jul 21, 2020 at 23:54 UTC as 8th comment | 2 replies
In reply to:

BrianVS: A camera with the sensor the size of a Pocket Instamatic 110 negative, blown up to the size of a Nikon D850. How did that work out for them? They are selling the Division. Olympus should have focused on smaller/high performance cameras and introduce new cameras with significant performance gains. There have been 10 EPL series cameras in less than 10 years. Why buy one when new, just wait a year for the old ones being cleared out. The beautiful Olympus Pen F- dead end line. Concentrate on the monster truck size cameras, everybody know "Bigger and Heavier must mean Better". So 1950s.

Looking over the current Olympus line- they went from leading edge technology when I bought my EP2 in 2010 with 1.44MDot (800x600 resolution) Electronic Viewfinder to offering an EVF that is five years behind the competition. The new Panasonic Full-Frame camera has a 5.76MDot ( ~1600x1200) resolution. The "high-end" cameras from Olympus have 2.36MDot, (~768x1024) Finders. The 3.68MDot (~1000x1280) finders were out 4 years ago. 20MPixel sensors are a practical limit, more resolution would require a lens with better than 100lp/mm to be meaningful.

Olympus should have at least improved the viewfinder. Panasonic will put new development into the L-Mount, Olympus is selling the Division to a company that will not be allowed to use the Olympus and Zuiko name. If what is available now meets people's needs, and you can get it at a good price- go for it. Do not look for much in the way of improvements, that effort is going into full-frame cameras.

Link | Posted on Jul 20, 2020 at 16:17 UTC
In reply to:

BrianVS: A camera with the sensor the size of a Pocket Instamatic 110 negative, blown up to the size of a Nikon D850. How did that work out for them? They are selling the Division. Olympus should have focused on smaller/high performance cameras and introduce new cameras with significant performance gains. There have been 10 EPL series cameras in less than 10 years. Why buy one when new, just wait a year for the old ones being cleared out. The beautiful Olympus Pen F- dead end line. Concentrate on the monster truck size cameras, everybody know "Bigger and Heavier must mean Better". So 1950s.

Whatever. If the company had a successful line of cameras, the Division would not be sold off. They screwed up royally, and their answer is to imitate the full-frame cameras with one that has a sensor designed to be compact.

If they wanted pros to buy Olympus, they should have gone full-frame, instead of just a camera that would be mistaken for a full-frame camera. The OM line replaced the Pen line 50 years ago, and pros started using Olympus.

Link | Posted on Jul 16, 2020 at 12:34 UTC

A camera with the sensor the size of a Pocket Instamatic 110 negative, blown up to the size of a Nikon D850. How did that work out for them? They are selling the Division. Olympus should have focused on smaller/high performance cameras and introduce new cameras with significant performance gains. There have been 10 EPL series cameras in less than 10 years. Why buy one when new, just wait a year for the old ones being cleared out. The beautiful Olympus Pen F- dead end line. Concentrate on the monster truck size cameras, everybody know "Bigger and Heavier must mean Better". So 1950s.

Link | Posted on Jul 15, 2020 at 23:55 UTC as 80th comment | 5 replies

The cross-stitch banding in the image of the table is awful. It looks more like what you expect from a video frame grab than a modern sensor. This is might be due to the use of a global shutter, or else there is some noise-source in the electronics that is causing problems. The company needs to get this under control for this to be a serious offering. Hopefully the images shown are from a pre-production prototype. The company needs to remark about the poor image quality shown here.

Link | Posted on Jul 12, 2020 at 15:26 UTC as 11th comment
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