citizenlouie

Joined on Jan 25, 2012

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Total: 153, showing: 61 – 80
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On article Leica invites entries for its Oskar Barnack Award 2013 (34 comments in total)
In reply to:

onlooker: This blurb from the entry rules caught my attention:

"The images must also be stored with 72dpi in JPG format".

Good god, can Leica hire someone who actually has a clue? This is embarrassing.

This is a pretty standard rule in photo competitions. They only want 72dpi because that's the resolution of most LCD monitor. Anything higher will just be a waste of disk space. They'll receive thousands of entries, they only want to pre-filter the entries first. If they like your photo, they'll ask for something with higher resolution and possibly a print. Most entries even ask you to downsize your photos to less than 3 megapixel. At least Leica didn't ask you to down resolution your photos.

Link | Posted on Dec 10, 2012 at 19:04 UTC

Unfortunately, I see Aptina's sensor still has a weird color bias from this example shot. I hope Aptina is listening. When you're a sensor maker, you want to show that your sensor is capable of reproducing accurate, life-like color. The special color mix is for camera maker and photographer to decide. While this photo looks /interesting/, but if I were a camera manufacturer, i would not build my professional level cameras with this sensor. It'll be a major headache to tweak the color profile so it'll look natural. Most people still shoot normal photos, Instagram.

Link | Posted on Oct 9, 2012 at 18:56 UTC as 3rd comment
In reply to:

orendanger: am i the only one that wounders what camera that is in the picture?

@orendanger

Yes, there is. It is above the EVF. It's just obscured behind the accessory port cover, which is also hot shoe cover.

Link | Posted on Sep 30, 2012 at 16:55 UTC
In reply to:

Fotogeneticist: Until an EVF has the same refresh rate and dynamic range that matches my eye, it will never replace OVFs for me. What does an EVF give me except for battery drain and shadows you can't see into? And to the poster that said an EVF needs 2MP to out-resolve an OVF, if you out resolve what your eye can see anyways, what good would that do?

I can see more things in the dark with OVF than EVF. This varies of course from person to person, because OVF depends on your own eyes' unaided light sensitivity. EVF boosts the light level at the cost of color accuracy and noise level. I think current gen of EVF is good enough in term of resolution, but what's lacking is refresh rate and noise level under low light and lack of color accuracy under extreme bright light (which is quite often in California that you see light above EV16, which is cloudless sunlight, sometimes you might even encounter EV18 situation).

Link | Posted on Sep 30, 2012 at 16:53 UTC
On article Photokina 2012: Olympus Stand Report (48 comments in total)
In reply to:

David Burren: The most interesting news (for me) from Olympus is the new 15mm/8 lens. But no mention of it here? What gives?

As a fixed-aperture manual-(2-step)-focus lens it should even work on Pany bodies (although the lack of in-body stabilisation might be a drawback at f/8). At the suggested price it's almost a no-brainer: a slightly expensive lens cap that doubles as a super-cheap 30mm-e walkaround lens. It'll be interesting to hear more about it over time.

But not even a mention? Had me double-checking that I wasn't imagining it. :)

It's an interesting product, but don't expect it to be stellar in image quality. Notice it's not even a Zuiko lens, so Olympus doesn't think it's quality enough.

It's really a lomo lens to make E-PMx series pocketable and already ready for shoot. And when I feel like shooting with a Holga, this would be a digital alternative (i do expect it to be sharper than a Holga). But it's a fun lens. US$50 is a good price.

Link | Posted on Sep 19, 2012 at 19:49 UTC
On article Photokina 2012: Sony Stand Report (44 comments in total)
In reply to:

JRApprentice: I am just about to display my ignorance but what the heck.

You say 'just how hard it is to get so much camera into such a small body...' re the RX1. Funny that, from the exploded view it looks like a 35mm lens set in a body in front of of an image sensor with with a body back behind. The little Halina I had as a lad and loads of other rangefinder cameras in he sixties and seventies managed that and didn't claim any special achievement as a result. Is it the electronics which make this difficult or is there some other mystery of digital camera construction that I am unaware of?

Just asking.

John

Don't know the details, but heat is a major design constraint for modern DSLR, because of that LCD screen in the back. You need to space things out before the heat shut the entire camera down or simply make the final image too noisy (heat will introduce interference).

Link | Posted on Sep 19, 2012 at 17:13 UTC
On article Photokina 2012: Sony Stand Report (44 comments in total)

The picture of RX1 shows off its aperture blades very well. Is it 9-blade construction? I think that might follow Zeiss philosophy very well for perfect bokeh.

Link | Posted on Sep 19, 2012 at 17:08 UTC as 10th comment | 1 reply
On article Photokina 2012: Olympus Stand Report (48 comments in total)
In reply to:

buongustaio: any news about the sooo much craved body that would better handle top-pro 4/3 lenses?
17mm aside, this is all i'm asking from this stand :)

Thank you Richard for keeping us posted. :-)

Link | Posted on Sep 18, 2012 at 22:33 UTC
On article Photokina 2012: Olympus Stand Report (48 comments in total)
In reply to:

buongustaio: any news about the sooo much craved body that would better handle top-pro 4/3 lenses?
17mm aside, this is all i'm asking from this stand :)

Yes. And will there be a new 4/3 DSLR for that matter? (an E-5 or an E-620 successor?)

Link | Posted on Sep 18, 2012 at 17:56 UTC
On article Photokina 2012: Olympus Stand Report (48 comments in total)
In reply to:

InTheMist: That's an impressive lens on the XZ-2. I just wish it had a viewfinder.

And no, I don't mean a 'stacker' viewfinder.

@Optimal Prime

Well, most lenses on DSLRs are nothing new. Some are decades old designs. Doesn't change the fact whether they're good or not.

Link | Posted on Sep 18, 2012 at 17:54 UTC
On article Photokina 2012: Pentax Ricoh Stand Report (42 comments in total)

Pentax K-30 looks very nice, and very compact for a camera with full features. No new Ricoh GXR cameras (or modules)?

Link | Posted on Sep 18, 2012 at 17:53 UTC as 11th comment | 2 replies
On article Photokina 2012: Olympus Stand Report (48 comments in total)

It's interesting the E-PL5 does not auto rotate its screen in self-portrait mode. Don't know if that's an early firmware bug or whatever. The sushi conveyor is fun.

XZ-2 is nicer than expected. Almost bought an XZ-1 just because I expected XZ-2 would be an evolutionary update rather than something new. The new type of hybrid lens dial is the killer feature here, something that matters more to a pro who wants a travel camera or simply an everywhere camera. It's interesting this more pro-oriented feature is on a camera with a smaller sensor than Sony RX-100 or even the FF RX-1.

Anybody else noticed lower end E-PM1's silver matches kit lenses's silver (and 45mm's silver) and higher end E-PL5's silver matches premium lenses's (12mm and 17mm's) silver? I expect 17mm's price to be US$100-200 less than 12mm because of an easier to design focal length, but the build quality, more often used focal length, and clutch MF look promising so that might command a premium.

Link | Posted on Sep 18, 2012 at 17:47 UTC as 10th comment
On article Photokina 2012: Leica Stand Report (15 comments in total)

Yes on the comment on M with viewfinder, but I bet some people who buys rangefinder style cameras don't get the idea of a rangefinder anyways, and that's actually a big share of the market.

Anyways, too many judgmental comments on the report. Not sure that's what a news report like this should be. I personally expect more from Paul Smith, but I wouldn't say that if I were just doing my job as a journalist, whose job is about integrity and objectivity.

They managed to put Andreas Gursky's work on display.... Wonder what type of photography they're promoting. Yes, conspicuous absence of S, which is a medium format camera, but Gursky might find that format too small.

Link | Posted on Sep 18, 2012 at 17:34 UTC as 8th comment
In reply to:

narddogg81: olympus should just become a third party lens manufacturer. i would buy their lenses, dont want to buy their cameras.

I also wish they would make lenses for third party. For example, I would love to use Zuiko lenses on Penta K-30.

However see how many contribution Olympus has made for modern DSLR concept.

LiveView for DSLR (comprehensive and sensible implementation, not just "we also have it". There are things like magnified MF check, WB preview, aspect ratio shooting, real time histogram, spirit level indicator, multiple exposure overlay, etc., some are implemented long before competitors caught up)
First effective sensor dust reduction technology
In-body image stabilization
Miniaturization (especially with current OM-D)
Weather proof as a "system" (entire list of 4/3 HG and SHG lenses are weather proof, to accompany E-x flagship line of camera body. Underwater housing for even the entry level E-620). When they released OM-D, they also released weather proof flash, lens adapter and grip, so the entire "system" is WR.

Link | Posted on Aug 17, 2012 at 21:42 UTC
In reply to:

3a: i may sound naive,
why does Olympus lenses (say 300 F2.8), which just have to cover half the image circle of a Full frame counterpart be this heavy (i guess 400gm more than nikon) and this costly (almost 1000+$ more) ?
i guess if Olympus had invested in making smaller and lower cost lenses (with similar quality), once they stopped making Film cameras, they would have been a more popular brand now.
i guess i made the right choice of moving from E-30 to D300s, even-though i was not dissatisfied with E-30.

Yes, 4/3 sensor is smaller than APS-C sensor. In fact, its squarer format means the image circle requirement is even less. However, with Super High Grade lenses (like 300mm f/2.8 you mentioned), Olympus takes the go-for-the-broke approach and delivers some of the near perfect lenses without considering much on the design constraints (e.g., size, cost to produce, material choices). They have the largest lens to sensor size ratio of any format for the sake of achieving absolutely best performance. For those who want something that competes well with other brands' offerings, HG is very good already. But SHG lenses are some of the near perfect lenses in every regard. SHG zoom lenses can beat most prime lenses easily.

If you just want some "smaller and lower cost lenses" as you said, you can just buy the standard grade lenses from Olympus, or m4/3 lenses. They're very similar in grade with competitors. HG lenses will exceed your expectation already.

Link | Posted on Aug 17, 2012 at 20:59 UTC
In reply to:

citizenlouie: I don't know, the second tip was shoot color for visual accuracy and realism.... None of the photos shown are visually accurate and real by my definition.... Of course these 70's photos were shot on film so it cannot be as accurate as digital on this respect, but now we have digital, which we've spent hours on tuning color profile and monitor (and if you print your own photos, tune your printer), we can (try) to get to as close to 100% accurate color and tonality as possible. The result can be very /underwhelming/ for modern viewers, who are used to super saturated color and high contrast that totally devoid of any sense of realism. I've been doing things in vein of "what my eyes see is what my photos look like" and most people just find them boring, often remarks like "underexposed" or "doesn't pop" or even "no apparent subject." Well, it's nice to do photo realism (I deeply believe in it), but realism doesn't sell.

That's my philosophy also. I think that's Ansel Adams's philosophy, too.

Link | Posted on Aug 14, 2012 at 20:29 UTC
In reply to:

amicus70: Art lays in the eye of the viewer.

I think it's out of discussion, that some of the pictures are a good handwork: right exposure etc (like the one shown here on dpr).

But I miss something special about the photography, too. Especially the pictures of streets - if they where mine I would have deleted them, because I couldn't find a trigger in them. They are just pics from the street, to much things in them to look at. You don't know where the core of the picture is, what he want to tell us with it. A picture of a half eaten burger with fries? The pics look like snapshots, just taken without thinking.

I don't like them, but if you... why not?

Yeah, there are many styles, and we should not too focused on styles alone.

I have seen some other photos I like more than others, but if everyone agrees on one style, then why so many artists with different schools of thought?

Link | Posted on Aug 14, 2012 at 06:12 UTC
In reply to:

citizenlouie: I don't know, the second tip was shoot color for visual accuracy and realism.... None of the photos shown are visually accurate and real by my definition.... Of course these 70's photos were shot on film so it cannot be as accurate as digital on this respect, but now we have digital, which we've spent hours on tuning color profile and monitor (and if you print your own photos, tune your printer), we can (try) to get to as close to 100% accurate color and tonality as possible. The result can be very /underwhelming/ for modern viewers, who are used to super saturated color and high contrast that totally devoid of any sense of realism. I've been doing things in vein of "what my eyes see is what my photos look like" and most people just find them boring, often remarks like "underexposed" or "doesn't pop" or even "no apparent subject." Well, it's nice to do photo realism (I deeply believe in it), but realism doesn't sell.

To JackM. I know what you're saying. Though to me real is beautiful. It's a document of a point in time. If it's a gloomy day, the photo should reflect it. If it's a colorful day, then so should the photo. If the scene doesn't worth a photo, then don't take it. Beauty can come from something humble or something romantic. The key is to document the subject with proper technique, rather than to romanticize it. Any subject has a quality one can bring out. Whether that's a quality most people like is another issue.

Though I gave in a little bit, and now started to PP my work toward popular trend, but I do still mix a few real photos with "look at me" ones. The result so far has been pretty predictable. I do hope to send the message across that realism would be the time-tested beauty and won't go out of style as people's taste changes. Time stamp on the photo should be the scene itself, rather than the date you finished your PP.

Link | Posted on Aug 14, 2012 at 06:05 UTC

I don't know, the second tip was shoot color for visual accuracy and realism.... None of the photos shown are visually accurate and real by my definition.... Of course these 70's photos were shot on film so it cannot be as accurate as digital on this respect, but now we have digital, which we've spent hours on tuning color profile and monitor (and if you print your own photos, tune your printer), we can (try) to get to as close to 100% accurate color and tonality as possible. The result can be very /underwhelming/ for modern viewers, who are used to super saturated color and high contrast that totally devoid of any sense of realism. I've been doing things in vein of "what my eyes see is what my photos look like" and most people just find them boring, often remarks like "underexposed" or "doesn't pop" or even "no apparent subject." Well, it's nice to do photo realism (I deeply believe in it), but realism doesn't sell.

Link | Posted on Aug 14, 2012 at 02:08 UTC as 70th comment | 5 replies
On article Evolution of an image (123 comments in total)

Oh, to those of you who think you need better time management. You can do the "Day 1" scout work while you're waiting for the right time for your reshoot work. If you don't have time this year, do it in another year. Things like Yosemite's firefall only happens when the condition is right at the end of February, so lots of photographers gathered at the foot of the fall could be in for a major disappoint if nothing happens that year. A pro doesn't nag and get defeated. Just come back another year, what's the big deal? If you can't deal with disappointment and has no patience, it's hard to be a landscape photographer for long (and that's only the beginning. Nobody always applaud at your years of effort at the end also, so yeah, learn to deal with it).

Link | Posted on Aug 10, 2012 at 17:38 UTC as 26th comment
Total: 153, showing: 61 – 80
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